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Full text of "Alabama College Bulletin: Catalog 1947-1948"

ALABAMA COLLEGE 

The State College for Women 

BULLETIN 

THE 1948-1949 SESSION 
M o n t e vallo, Alabama 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 

The State College for Women 

Bulletin 



Catalog Number 
19474948 




BULLETIN PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE COLLEGE 

Entered at the Post Office, Montevallo, Alabama, 
as Second Class Matter. 

Vol. XL, No. 4 APRIL, 1948 Total No. 166 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/alabamacollegebun166alab 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Part One 

Page 

The College Calendar 5 

The Board of Trustees 6 

Officers of Administration 7 

The Faculty 8 

Other Officers 15 

Laboratory School Faculty 16 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 17 

Part Two 

Historical Statement 18 

The Location 19 

Buildings and Grounds 19 

Laboratories 24 

Government and Student Welfare 27 

Special Services 29 

Organizations 32 

Publications 43 

Scholarships and Employment , 44 

Cost of Attendance 52 

Requirements for admission 55 

Registration 57 

Academic Regulations 58 

Requirements for Degrees 62 

Curricula 65 

Part Three 

Departmental Announcements 87 

Summer School Announcements, 1948 177 

Part Four 

Register of Students, 1947-1948 178 

Enrollment Summary, 1947-1948.... 189 

Enrollment by Counties 190 

Degrees Conferred, 1947 191 



1948 



1949 



JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


S M T WT F S 


S M T WT F S 


S M T WT F S 


S M T WT F S 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


I 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10: 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S M T WT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

IS 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 19 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T WT F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T WT F S 


S M T WT F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 19 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


S M T WT F S 


S M T WT F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T WT F S 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 2Z 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M T WT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 19 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
.8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M T WT F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 51 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



PART ONE 



THE COLLEGE CALENDAR 



1948 

"September 11 

September 11 

September 13 

September 14 

September 16 

September 16 

October 12 
October 30 
November 11 
November 25 
November 26 
December 11 

December 17 

1949 
January 2 
January 3 
January 28 
January 31 
February 3 

March 19 
March 31 
April 2 

April 8 
April 17 
April 18 
June 1 
May 31 -June 3 

June 3-6 
June 7 



Saturday. Dormitories open, lunch served. 

Saturday. Meeting of the Staff, 7:30 P.M. 

Monday. Registration of Freshmen, 8:00 A.M. 

Tuesday. Registration of Upper-classmen, 8:00 A.M. 

Thursday. Classes begin, 8:00 A.M. 

Thursday. Last day for registration without paying 
late registration fee. 

Tuesday. Founders Day. 

Saturday. Condition Examinations. 

Thursday. End of first nine weeks. 

Thursday. Thanksgiving. 

Friday. Regular classes will be held. 

Saturday. Friday afternoon classes will be held dur- 
ing the morning. 

Friday. Christmas vacation begins, 12:00 Noon. 

Sunday. Dormitories open, lunch served. 

Monday. Classes begin, 8:00 A.M. 

Friday. Examinations for first semester end. 

Monday. Second semester begins. 

Thursday. Last day for registration without paying 
late registration fee. 

Saturday. Condition Examinations. 

Thursday. End of first nine weeks. 

Saturday. Friday afternoon classes will be held dur- 
ing the morning. 

Friday. Spring vacation begins, 12:00 Noon. 

Sunday. Dormitories open, lunch served. 

Monday. Classes begin, 8:00 A.M. 

Wednesday. Senior Examinations end. 

Tuesday through Friday. Final examinations for 
lower-classmen. 

Friday through Monday. Commencement Exercises. 

Tuesday. Dormitories close, 12:00 Noon. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

His Excellenq^, James E. Folsom, Governor of Alabama, 
President, ex officio 

Austin R. Meadows, State Superintendent of Education, ex officio 

TERMS TO EXPIRE IN 1951 

Mrs. a. Y. Malone, Third District Dothao 

Nelson Fuller, Sixth District Centerville 

James C. Lee, Ninth District Birmingham 

Mrs. Edwina D. Mitchell, State-at-Large Montgomery 

TERMS TO EXPIRE IN 1955 

Samuel M. Johnston, First District Mobile 

Bruce Beveridge, Fourth District Selma 

M. L. Robertson, Seventh District Cullman 

TERMS TO EXPIRE IN 1959 

Mrs. James Fitts Hill, Second District Montgomery 

Mrs. a. G. Finlay, Fifth District Guntersville 

Horace T. Armstrong, Eighth District Scottsboro 

Hugh W. Cardon, State-at-Large Centre 

THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mrs. a. G. Finlay, Chairman Guntersville 

Hugh W. Cardon Centre 

Nelson Fuller Centerville 

Mrs. James Fitts Hill Montgomery 

Austin R. Meadows Montgomery 

Mrs. Edwina D. Mitchell Montgomery- 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 

The State College for Women 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

John Tyler Caldwell, B.S., A.M., M.A., Ph.D., President. 

Arthur Fort Harman, B.S., LL.D., President Emeritus. 

T. H. Napier, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., L.H.D., Dean 

Raymond D. Fowler, Business Manager and Treasurer. 

Winifred Castleman Black, A.B., Dean of Residence. 

Rochelle Rodd Cachet, A.B., M.A., Director, Vocational Advisory 
Service. 

Virginia Hendrick, Registrar. 

Anna Irvin, Ph.B., Food Supervisor. 

**Eloise Lee, A.B., M.A., Alumnae Secretary. 

Julia McEachin Lee, A.B., M.A., Director, Public Service. 

Mattie Lee, Bursar. 

M. L. Orr, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Summer School. 

WiLLENA Peck, M.D., LL.D., Physician. 

Abi Russell, A.B., M.S., Librarian. 

Minnie L. Steckel, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Student Counselor. 

*LouiSE LovELADY WiLSON, A.B., Alumnae Secretary. 



^Resigned January 1, 1948. 
**Assumed duties March 1, 1948. 



THE FACULTY 

Caldwell, John Tyler, President. 

B.S., Mississippi State College; A.M., Duke University; M.A., Co- 
lumbia University ; Ph.D., Princeton University. 

AcKERLEY, Lois A., Director, School of Home Economics. 

A.B., University of Iowa; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Iowa. 

Allen, Martha, Associate Professor of Art. 

A.B., Alabama College ; M.A., Columbia University. 

Anderson, A. C, Professor of Secondary Education. 
A.B., Howard College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Bailey, Paul C, Instructor in Biology. 

B.S., State Teachers College, Jacksonville, Alabama; M.A., Vanderbilt 
University. 

Balch, Martha Mahaffey, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
A.B., Alabama College. 

Barksdale, Lilian, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., Peabody College; M.A., University of Alabama. 

Barnes, Virginia W., Assistant Professor of Art. 
A.B., Alabama College; M.A., Columbia University. 

BiCKHAM, Ethel, Associate Professor of Home Economics. 
B.S., M.S., Ohio State University. 

Black, Winifred Castleman, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
A.B., Alabama College. 

Blackiston, Helen, Associate Professor of Biology. 
B.S,, M.A., Columbia University. 

Braswell, Mamie, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
B.S., University cf Alabama; M.A., Peabody College. 

Brooke, Myrtle, Professor Emeritus of Sociology. 

A.B., University of Nashville; M.A., Columbia University; LL.D., Ala- 
bama College. 

Brownfield, Lelah, Professor of Secretarial Science. 
A.B., University of Illinois ; M.A., New York University. 

Chamberlin, Elizabeth Blair, Associate Professor of Music. 

Graduate, Centenary College; Graduate, Cincinnati Conservatory; Four 
summers' study abroad. 



FACULTY 9 

CoMPTON, Mary E., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

■ Diploma, Ward- Belmont; A.B., University of Texas; M.A., North- 
western University. 

CoTNEY, Evelyn, Assistant Supervisor and Itinerant Teacher Trainer. 
B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

CowDEN, Willie Mae, Instructor in Sociology. 
B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institi:te. 

Davis, Marian, Instructor in Art. 
A.B., University of Arkansas; M.A., George Peabody College. 

Davis, Maxine Couch, Instructor in Music. 
B.M., Alabama College; M.M., Eastman School of Music. 

Dawson, Mattie Sue, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., University of Alabama. 

Deason, Mildred, Instructor in Health and Physical Education. 
B.S., Alabama College. 

Decker, Mary G., Associate Professor of Physical Science. 
B.S., University of Richmond; M.S., University of Chicago. 

DeMent, Susie, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., Alabama College. 

Dennis, Leah, Professor of English. 

A.B., M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Stanford University. 

Douglas, George A., Professor of Sociology. 

A.B., University of Michigan; Ph.M., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 
The Johns Hopkins University. 

Dunn, Minnie, Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.S., University of Alabama ; M.A., Columbia University. 

Eastman, Anne L., Associate Professor of History. 
A.B., Wells College; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Eddy, Josephine F., Associate Professor of Ho?ne Economics. 
B.S., M.A., Columbia University. 

Elgin, Ella Mae, Instructor in Secretarial Science. 

B.Ed., Illinois State Normal University; M.A., Northwestern Univer- 
sity. 

Evans, Arthur, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., North Texas State Teachers College. 

Farmer, Hallie, Professor of History. 
A.B., Indiana State Normal; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 



10 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Farrah, Katherine, Associate Professor of Music. 

A.B., University of Alabama ; Artists Diploma in Voice, and Certificate 
of Public School Music, University of Michigan; Study in Paris. 

Finger, Bernice, Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education. 
B.A., Huntingdon College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Fisher, Theron Cooper, Director of Boys' Physical Education, Lab- 
oratory School. 
A.B., Birmingham-Southern College. 

Flynn, Murray C, Instructor in Economics. 
A.B., University of Kansas. 

Foreman, Eleanor, Instructor in Health and Physical Education. 
A.A., Stephens College ; B.S., University of Alabama. 

FoRSYTHE, Sidney A., Instructor in Sociology. 

A.B., University of Kentucky; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary. 

GoLSON, Eva, Associate Professor of English. 
A.B., Huntingdon College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Gould, Ellen-Haven, Professor of Speech. 

A.B., Coe College; B.O., Northwestern University; M.A., University 
of California. 

Griffith, Lucille, Instructor in History. 
A.B., Belhaven College ; M.A., Tulane University. 

Hadley, Laura B., Associate Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College; M.S., University of Minnesota. 

Harris, Ethel, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., Alabama College; M.A., Peabody College. 

Hood, E. P., Assistant Professor of Physical Science. 

B.S., M.S., University of Alabama; LL.B., Birmingham Law School. 

Hudson, Carline, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Hurt, Seymour Harrison, Principal, Laboratory School. 
A.B., M.A., Mercer University, 

Jackson, Rosa Lea, Professor of Mathematics. 
A.B., Western College; M.A., Ph.D., L^niversity of Chicago. 

*Jeter, Lena N., Instructor in English. 
B.S., Alabama College. 



♦Employed part-time. 



FACULTY 1 1 

Kennedy, Dawn S., Professor of Art. 
B.S., M.A., Columbia University. 

Kennerly, Mary Ford, Instructor m Physical Science. 
A.B., Agnes Scott College. 

Kennerly, W. J., Professor of Physical Science. 
B.S., Clemson College; M.S., Emory University. 

Larkin, Mary, Assistant Supervisor and Itinerant Teacher Trainer. 
B.S., Alabama College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

LeBaron, H. D., Director, School of Music. 

A.B., Harvard University; M.A., Cornell University; Graduate, New- 
England Conservatory; Associate, American Guild of Organists. 

Lundquist, Cordell\, Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education. 
B.S., Winona State Teachers College; M.A., State University of Iowa. 

McCall, Margaret, Professor of Health and Physical Education. 

A.A., Christian College; B.S., M.A., University of Missouri; D.Ed., 
New York University. 

McCauley, Georgene, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., Texas Technological College; M.Ed., Texas University. 

McCoy, Mary M., Professor of Religious Education. 

Graduate, Huntsville College; L.H.D., Birmingham-Southern College. 

McGee, Bertie M., Associate Professor of Secretarial Science. 
A.B., B.S., North Georgia College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina. 

Marshall, Ethel, Instructor in History. 
A.B., Birmingham-Southern College; M.A., University of Alabama. 

Meroney, Eloise, Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., University of Alabama; M.A., Columbia University. 

Moore, Ouida, Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., Louisiana Polytechnic Institute; M.A., M.S., Columbia Univer- 
sity. 

Morales, Emilia, Instructor in Foreign Languages. 

Graduate, Colegio de Nuestra Senora de la Presentacion ; Graduate, 
The Superior Normal School, Bogota, Colombia; A.B., Alabama Col- 
lege. 

Napier, Lucile Denton, Instructor in History. 
A.B., Western State Teachers College; M.A., University of Kentucky. 

Napier, T. H., Professor of Psychology. 

Graduate, West Kentucky State Normal School; B.S., Southern Nor- 
mal College; M.A., Ph.D., Peabody College; L.H.D., Birmingham- 
Southern College. 



12 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Newell, Leacy, Assistant Supervisor and Itinerant Teacher Trainer, 
B.S., Alabama College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Niven, Jeanette, Instructor in Sociology. 
A.B., Alabama College. 

Nybeck, Glennie, Assistant Supervisor and Itineratit Teacher Trainer. 
B.S., Alabama College; M.S., Iowa State College. 

Old, Myrtle, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., Tennessee State Teachers College. 

Ordway, Claire, Assistant Professor of Music. 

Mus.B., Oberlin Conservatory; Mus.M., Syracuse University. 

Orr, M. L., Professor of Education. 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., Ph.D., Peabody College. 

Parrish, Helen, Instructor in Speech. 
A.B., Alabama College. 

Peter, Lorraine, Associate Professor of History. 
A.B., Ripon College ; M.A., Columbia University. 

Peterson, Charlotte W., Assistant Principal, Laboratory School. 
Diploma, Alabama College. 

Philpot, Frank N., Associate Professor of Secondary Education. 
B.S., Athens College ; M.A., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Pierson, Lorraine, Professor of Foreign Languages. 

A.B., M.A., Transylvania College; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois; Diploma, University of Dijon, France. 

Puryear, Sarah, Assistant Professor of English. 
A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Peabody Ccllege. 

Reinke, Edgar C, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. 
A.B., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Rice, Lela Wade, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., M.A., Peabody College. 

Robinson, Ruby Lea, Assistant Supervisor and Itinerant Teacher 
Trainer. 
B.S., Alabama Ccllege. 

Rogers, Bettie, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., University of Alabama ; M.A., Peabody College. 

Russell, Abi, Librarian. 

A.B., University of Georgia; M.S., Columbia University; Diploma, 
Emory University Library School. 



FACULTY 13 

Saylor, Edythe, Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education. 

A.B., Universit}^ of Iowa; M.A., University of Wisconsin. 

Sharp, C. G., Professor of Biology. 

B.S., M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Smenner, Olivia, Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 
B.S., M.A., Columbia University. 

Sparks, Nona, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 

Diploma, Florence Normal School; B.S., M.A., George Peabody Col- 
lege. 

Starr, Gladys Virginia, Instructor in Home Economics. 

B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State College. 

Steckel, Minnie L., Professor of Psychology. 
A.B., University of Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Stockton, Elizabeth, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. 
B.S., M.A., University of Missouri. 

Stovall, Ruth, Associate Supervisor and Itinerant Teacher Trainer. 
B.S., Alabama College; M.S., Cornell University. 

Strom, Ina, Assista?2t Professor of Music. 
Mus.B., Northvv^estern University. 

Trumbauer, Walter H., Professor of Dramatic Literature and Di- 
rector of College Theatre. 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Trumbauer, Willilee, Assistant to Director of College Theatre. 

A.B., Alabama College; M.A., Vanderbilt University. 
Vaughan, a. W., Professor of English. 

B.S., Central College; M.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., Peabody Col- 
lege. 

ViCKERY, Katherine, Professor of Psychology. 
A.B., North Georgia College; M.A., Ph.D., Peabody College. 

Walker, Vinnie Lee, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 
B.S., Athens College; M.A., Peabody College. 

* Wall ACE, Margaret, Instructor in English. 
Alabama College. 

Ward, Lillian K., Instructor in English. 
A.B., Alabama College. 



^Employed part-time. 



14 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Weary, Bettie, III, Instructor in Psychology. 
A.B., Barnard College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Wells, Rosa Lee, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 

B.S., Central Missouri State Teachers College; M.A., Peabody College. 

Whatley, Mary H., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
B.S., University of Alabama. 

Wilson, Maryland, Assistant Professor of Speech and Director of 
Radio Service. 
A.B., Winthrop College; M.A., University of Michigan. 

Winer, Honor Mary, Associate Professor of Music. 

Graduate, Western State Normal, Michigan ; Diploma, Franco Man- 
nucci Conservatory, Milan, Italy; Three years' study in Italy; Private 
v^ork, voice and theory, Chicago ; Cosmopolitan School of Music, Chic- 
ago; Columbia Conservatory, Chicago. 

Young, Victor, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 

B.S., College of Wooster ; B.M., Wooster Conservatory of Music ; 

M.M., University of Michigan. 

ZiOLKOWSKi, MiECiSLAW, Professor of Music. 

Master Class in Piano, Stern Conservatory, Berlin ; with Paderewski 
in Switzerland. 



15 

OTHER OFFICERS AND STAFF MEMBERS 

Cooper, O. B., Engineer. 

Dendy, Emma Stribling, Assistant Librarian. 

Duncan, Mrs. Louise Bingham, House Director, Tutwiler Hall. 

*Edwards, Mrs. Georgia Kendrick, Assistant in the Library. 

Edwards, Lucile, Assistant Librarian. 

Elliott, Mrs. Bessie R., Secretary to the Business Manager. 

Gardner, Mrs. Frances Reid, Senior Secretary, Vocational Division, 

School of Home Economics. 
Gee, Mrs. Clinton L., Assistant House Director, Main Hall. 
Grady, Rebecca, Secretary to the Dean. 

Hardy, Mrs. Audrey Gothard, Secretary to the Student Counselor. 
Harman, M. D., Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings. 
Irvin, Edna, Assistant Food Supervisor. 
Johnson, I. P., Manager of Dairy and Farm. 
Kemp, Annie, House Director, Hanson Hall. 
Leeper, Georgie, Manager of Supply Store. 
Mahaffey, C. H., Manager of Laundry. 
Manderson, Gertrude, Bookkeeper. 
Marshall, Mrs. Vivlan H., House Director, Ramsay Hall. 
McNeill, Mrs. Mary McLeod, House Director, Main Hall. 
NoRDAN, Mrs. Theda Wyatt, Secretary to the President. 
Tillman, Ollie, Nurse. 
* Turner, May, Assistant in the Library. 

Warnke, Mrs. Minnie Blanchard, Assistant in the Supply Store. 
Wills, Mrs. E. H., Hostess, Reynolds Hall. 
Wilson, Gulmer, Secretary, Vocational Division, School of Home 

Economics. 
Woods, Mrs. Laura Lyman, Hostess, Reynolds Hdl. 



*Temporary appointment. 



16 

FACULTY OF THE LABORATORY SCHOOL 

M. L. Orr, Ph.D., Director 
S. H. Hurt, M.A., Principal 

HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Balch, Martha Mahaffey, A.B., Supervisor of Modern Languages. 

Barksdale, Lilian, M.A., Supervisor of History. 

Dawson, Mattie Sue, B.S., Supervisor of Home Economics. 

DeMent, Susie, B.S., Supervisor of Secretarial Science. 

Evans, Arthur C, B.S., Supervisor of Arts and Crafts. 

Fisher, Theron, B.A., Director of Boys' Physical Education. 

Frederick, Ruth, B.S., Teacher in the Junior High School. 

Harris, Ethel, M.A.^ Supervisor of Social Studies. 

Hudson, Carline, M.S., Supervisor of Science. 

McCauley, Georgene, M.Ed., Supervisor of Girls' Physical Education. 

McKenzie, Thelma, A.B., Teacher of Mathematics. 

Morgan, Helen, A.B., Teacher of History. 

Old, Myrtle, B.S., Supervisor of Home Economics. 

RiGGS, Anacile, B.S., Teacher in the Junior High School. 

Spann, Virginia, A.B., Teacher in the Junior High School. 

Walker, Vinnie Lee, M.A., Supervisor of English. 

Young, Victor, M.M., Supervisor of Music. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Peterson, Charlotte W., Assistant Principal. 

*Anderson, Maggie T., A.B., Teacher of Third and Fourth Grades. 

Eddings, Mrs. O. G., Teacher of Second Grade. 

Fancher, Annie Lou, A.B,, Teacher of Fifth and Sixth Grades. 

Holcomb, Gladys D., A.B., Teacher of Third Grade. 

Lawley, Lydia Bridges, A.B., Teacher of Kindergarten. 

Phillips, Sarah ]., A.B., Teacher of Fifth Grade. 

Rice, Lela Wade, M.A., Supervisor of First Grade. 

Rogers, Bettie, M.A., Supervisor of Sixth Grade. 

Sparks, Nona, M.A., Supervisor of Fourth Grade. 

Wells, Rosa Lee, M.A., Supervisor of Second Grade. 



*Employed part-time. 



17 

FACULTY COMMITTEES 

College Staff Council, T. H. Napier, Chairman; Dawn S. Ken- 
nedy, Eloise Meroney, Lorraine Peter, Edgar C. Reinke. 

Admission. Minnie L. Steckel, Chairman; A. C. Anderson, Eva Gol- 
son. 

Alumnae. Eloise Meroney, Chairman; Martha Allen, Virginia W. 
Barnes, Winifred Castleman Black, Katherine Vickery, Lillian K. 
Ward, Louise Lovelady Wilson. 

Concert and Lectures. Katherine Farrah, Chairman; Bernice 
Finger, Ellen-Haven Gould, Frank N. Philpot, Edythe Saylor. 

Graduate Study. Katherine Vickery, Chairman; Leah A. Dennis, 
Anne L. Eastman, Bertie McGee, C G. Sharp. 

Library. Abi Russell, Chairman; Anne L. Eastman, Rosa Lea Jack- 
son, Edythe Saylor, W. H. Trumbauer. 

Public Ceremonies. W. J. Kennerly, Chairman; Martha Allen, 
Winifred Castlem^an Black, Josephine F. Eddy, Katherine Farrah. 

Radio. Maryland Wilson, Chairman; Laura Hadley, H. D. LeBaron, 
Julia M. Lee, Helen Parrish, Sarah Puryear. 

Reorganization of Instruction. M. L. Orr, Chairman; (A) Cur- 
riculum Research, Lois A. Ackerley, Hallie Farmer, Lorraine Pier- 
son, C. G. Sharp; (B) Division Chairmen, A. C. Anderson, 
George A. Douglas, Dav/n So Kennedy, W. J. Kennerly, A. W. 
Vaughan. 

Student Assistance. Minnie L. Steckel, Chairman; Lois A. Acker- 
ley, Mary E. Compton. 

Student Government Advisory. Winifred Castleman Black, Chair- 
man; Hallie Farmer, Lois A. Ackerley, Eva Golson, Margaret 
McCali, Frank N. Philpot. 



18 

PART TWO 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

Alabama College was established as the Alabama Girls Industrial 
School through a bill introduced in the State Senate in 1892 by Sol D. 
Bloch, of Camden. Steered through the House by John McQueen, of 
Birmingham, the bill was passed the following year. On January 1, 
1896, Montevallo was selected as the site of the College because of the 
town's location near the geographical center of the state, its healthful 
surroundings, and a substantial gift of cash and property by its citizens. 

The School opened its doors on October 12, 1896, with Captain 
Henry Clay Reynolds, of Montevallo, as president, a faculty of six, 
and a student enrollment of one hundred forty-five. The only physical 
equipment was Reynolds Hall, erected in 1851. Reynolds is today one 
of the stateliest buildings on the Montevallo campus. It serves as the 
College Union Building. 

In 1911 the name of the institution was changed to Alabama Girls 
Technical Institute, and in 1919 to Alabama Technical Institute and 
College for Women. On September 9, 1923, the present name was 
adopted. 

Management of the College from the beginning has been vested in 
a Board of Trustees composed of the Governor, who is its president, 
the State Superintendent of Education, and eleven members appointed 
by the Governor, one from each of the nine Congressional Districts 
and two from the State-at-Large. 

During the fifty-two years since its opening, the College has had 
six presidents. The first. Captain Henry Clay Reynolds, had been a 
lieutenant in the Confederate States Army, and at the time of his elec- 
tion was a merchant and planter. In 1899 he was succeeded by Dr. 
Francis Marion Peterson, Professor of Ancient Languages at Southern 
University, Greensboro (now Birmingham-Southern). The third presi- 
dent, Dr. Thomas Waverly Palmer, before coming to Montevallo in 
1907 had been Dean, and Professor of Mathematics at the University 
of Alabama. In 1926 Dr. O. C. Carmichael, Dean of the College since 
1922, became the fourth president. The fifth president to be chosen in 
1935 was Dr. Arthur Fort Harman and he was succeeded by Dr. John 
Tyler Caldwell, who assumed his duties on September 1, 1947. 

By wholesome growth, Alabama College has developed from its 
beginning as a girls' school with a curriculum covering high school 
subjects, special work in commercial courses, normal training, music. 



THE LOCATION 19 

and domestic arts, to a standard liberal arts college, granting the Bache- 
lor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor 
of Science degrees. 

Alabama College in 1925 was admitted to membership in the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and in 1928 
to the Association of American Colleges. In 1931 it was approved by 
the American Association of University Women, and in the same year 
the school of Music was accredited by the National Association of 
Schools of Music. The College was placed on the approved list of the 
Association of American Universities and was granted membership in 
the American Council on Education and the Southern University Con- 
ference in 1935. It is also a member of the Association of Alabama 
Colleges and the National Association of Business Teacher Training 
Institutions. 

THE LOCATION 

Located in Montevallo, a picturesque village near the exact center 
of the state, Alabama College is accessible by railroads and improved 
highways. Students may come directly to the Montevallo station on the 
Southern Railroad line extending from Rome, Georgia, to Meridian, 
Mississippi; or by taxi from Calera seven miles away on the main line 
of the Louisville and Nashville; or to Wilton, two miles distant on the 
Southern line between Birmingham and Mobile. 

To the east, Montevallo is connected by seven miles of paved road 
with Calera on the Montgomery-Birmingham Highway No. 31. Paved 
Highway No. 25 leads to Centerville, connecting with highways serving 
the western part of the State. The Alabama Coaches Company runs 
regular bus lines between Montevallo, Birmingham, Gadsden, Tusca- 
loosa, Sylacauga, and intervening points. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The College grounds consist of one hundred six acres. These in- 
clude the land on which the laboratory schools are located, which was 
given to the College by the Town of Montevallo. All main streets and 
walks have been paved. The addition of shrubbery, flowers and year- 
round green lawns has made of the campus one of the beauty spots 
of Alabama. 

An out-door theatre is situated in the natural cup just below and 
to the south of the President's residence. The Sports Field on the lower 
campus provides space for an archery range, four badminton courts, 
four volleyball courts, two softball diamonds, two soccer fields, one 
hockey field, a battery of twelve tennis courts and facilities for golf. 
The outdoor swimming pool is located adjacent to the Sports Field. 



20; ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Thomas Waverly Palmer Hall, which bears the name of the 
third president of the College, was opened in 1930. It contains admin- 
istration offices, an auditorium seating approximately sixteen hundred,: 
excellent stage facilities, and one of the great institutional pipe organs 
of the South. 

Comer Hall, named for Braxton Bragg Comer, Governor of 
Alabama 1907-1911, was completed and dedicated in 1940. This is a 
classroom and faculty office building. It houses the broadcasting studios 
of the College. 

Bloch Hall is named in honor of Sol D. Bloch, of Camden, 
Alabama, who was author of the bill establishing the College and who 

served continuously on the Board of Trustees from its organization 
until 1919. The building, which was opened in 1915, contains class- 
rooms, departmental offices and laboratories. 

Reynolds Hall was erected in 1851, the lot having been donated 
by Edmund King. It is named for Captain H. C. Reynolds, the first 
president of the College. In front of this building men from the vicinity 
were mustered into service for the War Between the States, a regiment 
receiving here the flag made by the women of Montevallo. It was first 
the home of the Montevallo Male Institute and was converted by the 
Cumiberland Presbyterians into a school for women. From 1896 until 
1939, it was used as an academic building by Alabama College. 

In 1939, Reynolds Hall was remodeled and converted into a Col- 
lege Union Building, a center for the organization and social activities 
of the students, faculty and alumnae of the College, it contains on the 
first floor the offices of the Student Government Association, Alum- 
nae Secretary^ and Vocational Advisory Service, a reception hall, men's 
lounge, loafing porch, tea room, post office and supply store, banquet 
room, two small dining rooms and a kitchen. On the second floor are 
located Reynolds Theatre, the Y. W. C. A. office, student publications 
offices, Religious Minorities Room, several committee rooms and two 
large m.eeting rooms. 

A large part of the equipment for this building was furnished by 

the Alabama College Alumnae Association. 

Calkins Hall, completed in 1917, is named in memory of the 
late Charles Pvendell Calkins, director of music from 1913 to 1920. It 
contains the office of the director of the School of Music, classrooms, 
studios, practice rooms, and a recital hall. 

Bibb Graves Hall, completed in 1938, is the center of activity 
for the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. The 
building is located on the lower campus adjacent to the Sports Field. 
It contains a large gymnasium, dance studio, classroom designed for 



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Thomas Waverly Palmer Hall, opened in 1930, bears the name of 
the third president of the College. 






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The Tower, historic landmark at Alabama College. 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 21 

correctives and first aid, lounges and faculty offices. Space is provided 
in the gymnasium for three badminton courts, two volley ball courts, 
one basket ball court, ping pong, shuffleboard and other activities of 
a recreational nature. 

Peterson Hall, the College Infirmary, erected in 1913, is named 
in honor of the second president of the College, Dr. Francis Marion 
Peterson. 

King House, erected in 1823, was the "Mansion House" of Ed- 
mund King, the first owner of land on which the College is built. Now 
used for offices of the Student Counselor and members of the Psychol- 
ogy Department, King House is said to be the first brick house and 
the first house with glass windows in this part of the State. 

The Storrs Residence has been remodeled and moved from the 
southeast corner of the campus to a central location, where it is used 
by the Home Economics Department of the laboratory school. 

The Sociology Building, a frame structure located just within 
the East Gate, has been enlarged and improved to provide offices for 
members of the Sociology Department. 

The President's Residence, of colonial architecture, was erected 
in 1926 on the highest point on the northern end of the campus. 

The Edward Houston Wills Memorl\l Library, named in 
honor of the late Edward Houston Wills, who served the College from 
1909 to 1946 as teacher, registrar, and business manager, was erected 
in 1922-1923 and enlarged in 1939. It is centrally located and har- 
monizes architecturally with other buildings on the campus. The recent 
addition includes offices, a periodical reading room, a stack room for 
bound magazines, and an outdoor reading roof. The building now ac- 
commodates 225 readers, and the book capacity, when necessary stacks 
liave been installed, will be approximately 95,000 volumes. 

The book collection now numbers 55,091 volumes, and the num- 
ber of books added each year averages about 2,000. The books are 
chosen primarily for the use of students and faculty in the courses of- 
fered, though provision is made for recreational and cultural reading. 
The facilities of the library are available also to alumnae and to study 
clubs using the programs prepared by the College. Although the sup- 
plying of books to people throughout the state is limited to clubs, cor- 
respondence students, and alumnae, the resources of the library are at 
the disposal of all who come for reference assistance, or who write for 
information. The library is classified by the Dewey Decimal System 
and is catalogued by author, title, and subject matter. Students have 
access to all books and a special effort is made to teach them the 
methods of using the library. 



J 22 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

I 

I The Library receives currently 399 magazines and 16 newspapers, 

I The periodicals of value for reference purposes are bound, and, as 

I funds permit, files are being completed. Subscriptions to periodical 

I indexes include Art Index, Education Index, Readers' Guide, Industrial 

Arts Index, International Index, The New York Times Index, and 

Public Affairs Information Service. 

i With the exception of a few special collections, books are usually 

f charged for two weeks to students, faculty members, and officers. Vol- 

; umes containing material limited to one subject may be drawn for a 

semester by an instructor who needs the material for class work. Dur- 
ing the week the library is open in the regular session from 8 A.M. to 
I 9:30 P.M., except during lunch and dinner hours and Saturday nights. 

It is open on Sundays from 12:30 P.M. to 1:00 P.M. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

I Main Dormitory comprises three distinct units, connected by 

i cross halls. The three wings are named for distinguished teachers who 

I served the institution for many years. The east wing is known as Mary 

Goode Stallworth Hall, the central wing as Annie Kennedy Hall, the 
west wing as Elizabeth Haley Hall. The dormitory contains parlors, re- 
ception halls, dining halls and rooms for approximately four hundred 
I twenty students. 

Ramsay Hall is named for Mrs. Janet Erskine Ramsay, the 
mother of Mr. Erskine Ramsay, of Birmingham. Mr. Ramsay gave 
$100,000 toward the erection of the building. It was occupied first in 
1925 and accommodates approximately one hundred twenty students. 

Hanson Hall is named for the late Mrs. Weenona Hanson, 
whose husband, the late Mr. Victor Hanson, contributed substantially 
toward its erection in 1929. It accommodates approximately one hun- 
dred ninety students. 

TuTWiLER Hall, named for Julia Strudwick Tutwiler, who was 
the first elected president of Alabama College though she resigned be- 
fore the opening day, was completed and dedicated m 1940. This hall 
provides one hundred two students with a modern and unusually at- 
tractive campus residence. Tutwiler Hall also houses a large recreation 
room in the basement. 

LABORATORY SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

The Junior and Senior High Schools were transferred in 1929 
from Reynolds Hall on the College campus to a new laboratory school 
building, erected through the cooperation of the County Board of Edu- 
cation, the State Board of Education, and the College. It contains of- 
fices, combined auditoriimi and gymnasuim, and classrooms, housing 
all high school work except that in home economics. 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 23 

The Elementary Laboratory School building, constructed by 
the Town of Montevallo and used for a number of years as a practice 
school, was deeded to the College in 1928. It contains classrooms, of- 
fices, a cafeteria, and a small auditorium. 

The Mary Alice Boyd building, located between the High 
School and the original Elementary School building, was constructed 
in 1939. This building has been named in honor of Mary Alice Boyd, 
a beloved former principal of the school. It is used for the lower ele- 
mentary grades. 

OTHER FACILITIES 

Radio Station WAPI, Birmingham, (1070 kilocycles), is jointly 
owned by Alabama College, the University of Alabama, and Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute. Over this and several other stations, Alabama 
College, now in its twentieth year on the air, broadcasts four weekly 
programs originating in the campus studio in Comer Hall or in Palmer 
Auditorium. Alabama Music Time, a regular course in public school 
music, is heard on Wednesday and Thursday afternoons; while Ala- 
bama Feature Page, broadcast on Friday afternoons, deals with Ala- 
bama people, places, and events in the news. Tuesday evening and 
special broadcasts combine the talents of officers, faailty, students, and 
guests for programs of outstanding entertainment and educational value. 
Through the Radio Workshop students acquire training and experience 
in directing and acting, as well as in writing and monitoring programs. 

The Supply Store is maintained in Reynolds Hall for the con- 
venience of students. It is connected with the College post office, where 
mail is delivered twice daily. 

The Power House supplies heat to all campus buildings. 

The Laundry, adjacent to the Power House, serves students, 
staff and departments of the College. 

The Camp House, which was completed and used for the first 
time in the Spring of 1929, is located on a wooded hillside about a 
mile from the campus. The Camp House was erected and furnished 
through the funds of the Recreation Association and is maintained by 
this organization for the use of all students in college. A large living 
room, fire place, kitchen, dining room, and sleeping porch offer over- 
night facilities for students and faculty members. The Camp House is 
the week-end retreat of student groups who want a short, inexpensive 
outing. The meadow below camp is a popular place for large picnic 
parties. 

A Camp Counselor, elected by the Recreation Association, su- 
pervises the use and maintenance of the Camp House. 



24 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

The Dairy Farm contains approximately two hundred acres, 
eighty-five of which are under cultivation. The herd consists of over 
one hundred registered and grade Jersey and Holstein cattle. 

The Water Supply of the College is declared by health authori- 
ties to be excellent. Spring water is purified by a filtration plant com- 
pleted in 1936. The supply serves for fire protection as well as for the 
needs of all campus buildings. Within the buildings are chemical fire 
extinguishers and fire hose, and outside there are plugs to which fire 
hose may be attached. Fire hose carts, each containing five hundred 
feet of hose, are conveniently located so that several streams of water 
can be concentrated at any point. Two fire drills are held each month. 

LABORATORIES 

biology 

Laboratories of the Department of Biology occupy six rooms in 
Bloch Hall. Three of these rooms are equipped with special facilities 
and supplies for courses in general biology, zoology, botany, histology, 
and physiology, such as compound microscopes, dissecting lenses, 
mounted slides, microtomes, paraffin oven, field glasses for the study 
of birds, charts, models, skeletons, plant and animal specimens, balop- 
ticon, and moving picture machine. A fourth room has been designed 
especially for laboratory courses in general and pathogenic bacteriology. 
It contains sterilizers, incubators, autoclaves, hot air oven, Wasserman 
bath, steel lockers, and oil immersion microscopes. The remaining two 
rooms are used as lecture rooms. A green house for the use of the de- 
partment adjoins the laboratories. 

home economics 

The Home Economics Department occupies the first floor of Bloch 
Hall. There are two clothing laboratories at the north end of the build- 
ing. The equipment of these laboratories includes various types of sew- 
ing machines and a Scott tensile strength testing machine. 

The food laboratories are located in the south end of the building. 
One is arranged on the unit kitchen plan with different types of equip- 
ment in each kitchen. The other laboratory is arranged in an ell with 
kitchen-dinette combination room occupying the corner. The labora- 
tories are connected with a pantry, serving pantry, and dining room. 

A combination home furnishing laboratory and reading room is 
located in the center of the building. Here are found all the periodicals 
pertaining to home economics. 

The household equipment laboratory is found in the basement of 
Bloch Hall. Here are facilities for testing various household electrical 
equipment as well as the equipment for repairing and refinishing 
furniture. 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 25 

llie Nursery School is housed in a two-story frame dwelling. It 
has two play rooms, dining room, kitchen, bathroom, two sleeping 
rooms, reception hall, and a reading room for parents. The back yard 
is large and provides ample play space for sand piles, jungle gym, slide, 
swings, tree house, and garden activities. 

The College has two Home Management Houses. The one in 
Montevallo is an eight-room cottage-type house, with room for six girls 
and a director. The house in Columbiana is a two-story colonial, pro- 
viding residence for eight girls and a director. Both houses serve as 
laboratories for senior students in home management. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

The Laboratories of the Physical Science Department are located 
on the third floor of Bloch Hail and occupy seven rooms in this build- 
ing. Each laboratory is equipped with standard furniture, consisting of 
Alberlene stone-top desks. The two hundred and twenty-eight student 
lockers supplied by these desks are ample for all the work offered in 
this department. The Chemistry laboratories are equipped with water 
baths, hot air ovens, hoods, and other standard laboratory equipment. 

The Physics laboratory is equipped with six regulation physics 
tables accommodating four students each. Sufficient physics equipment 
is available for offering the courses in general and household Physical 
Science. 

SPEECH 

The Speech Laboratory is located on the first floor of Comer Hall. 
A modern, acoustically treated studio and adjoining control room house 
the various auditory aids available. Recordings are made on a high 
fidelity Presto Recording machine. Other equipment includes dual 
speed RCA turntables and speaker, and the new Western Electric 
Mirrophone. 

In addition to the auditory aids, the Speech Laboratory is also 
equipped with many visual aids such as models of the speech mechan- 
ism and films of the vocal apparatus. 

THEATRE 

The theatre laboratories provide exceptional opportunities for stu- 
dent training in all phases of dramatic art. Students learn the use of 
technical equipment and the media of artistic production in two wellr 
equipped theatres. 

Palmer Theatre, where the plays are presented, is generally 
acknowledged to be one of the best equipped and acoustically perfect 
theatres in the entire South. Its capacity is 1600. The stage, 33'x67', 



26 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

with a gridiron of some 40' makes for flexibility and quick changes. A 
large Major switchboard takes care of the lighting. In the basement 
are a large make-up laboratory, a wardrobe, and dressing rooms. 

Reynolds Theatre, located in the Student Union Building, provides 
excellent facilities for rehearsal and laboratory purposes. It has a stage 
of 24'xl7'xl7' and a seating capacity of 300. A Capital portable switch- 
board, with border and foot strips, together with fresnels, floods, and 
baby spots, and other miscellaneous lighting equipment make it pos- 
sible to secure practice in the fundamentals of lighting. 

For training in the scenic aspects of the theatre, there is a Work- 
shop for the making and painting of scenery. One half of this 60'x50' 
shop is used for this practical work. The other half is used to house 
scenery. 

A wardrobe of some three thousand items, consisting mainly of 
Greek, Elizabethan, Chinese, Japanese, 18th Century garments, is 
housed in Palmer basement and in Reynolds. 



27 
GOVERNMENT AND STUDENT WELFARE 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Young women attending the College are accorded every privilege 
consistent with their welfare and opportunities, but the College, deeply 
conscious of its obligations to their parents and guardians as well as 
to the State, makes every effort to keep constantly in the minds of stu- 
dents the importance of maintaining high moral and social standards. 

The Student Government Association, subject to approval by the 
College authorities, adopts such regulations as are needed for non- 
academic affairs on the campus, and all students are expected to co- 
operate with the Executive Board and Student Senate in their observance. 

Students are not allowed to remain in Montevallo after Commence- 
ment or after the beginning of holidays unless written requests are re- 
ceived by the Dean of Residence from their parents or guardians. A 
student wishing to visit a local home must secure, in addition to this 
permission, an invitation from the head of the family at whose home 
she is to visit. 

No student, whether rooming in a dormitory or in a private home, 
is allowed to have an automobile for her use during the session. 

Students may entertain guests in the dormitories for as many as 
three consecutive days by registering their names in the office of their 
residence hall. Meal tickets for the guests should be purchased from 
the House Director. 

HEALTH 

Peterson Hall, the campus infirmary with thirty-six beds, is main- 
tained exclusively for the care of students in all medical cases. It is 
deemed best to send surgical cases off the campus. A full-time physi- 
cian and two nurses have charge of this department and live in the in- 
firmary. 

During the first weeks of each session the members of the Medi- 
cal Department in conjunction with the members of the Health and 
Physical Education Department give students a health examination. On 
the result of this examination depends the type of activity which the 
student may elect, varying from limited activity to activities of a more 
strenuous nature. 

Members of the faculty are instructed to report to the resident 
physician any students who need advice concerning their health. All 
students unable to attend classes are required to report to the infirm- 
ary. This insures prompt care for those who need it and safeguards 
other students. 



28 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Although the College is non-sectarian, its students find on the 
campus and in the town of Montevallo excellent religious influences. 
In addition to the College Young Women's Christian Association, 
there are a number of organized church groups in Montevallo where 
students may find congenial Christian fellowship, and opportunities 
for training in religious leadership. Five churches — Baptist, The Church 
of Christ, Episcopal, Methodist, and Presbyterian — welcome students 
to join in their religious life. Students belonging to the less numerous 
sects hold services in a special Religious Minorities Room in the Col- 
lege Union Building, Reynolds Hall. Mass is held here for Catholic 
students by a Priest who makes regular visits to the campus. It is also 
available to students of the Jewish faith, and others who do not have 
a church with which they may affiliate in Montevallo. Students of the 
College are encouraged to attend the church of their choice. 

COLLEGE NIGHT 

The highlight of the student year is College Night. This is the 
greatest all-student tradition at Alabama College. 

College Night is the culmination of four weeks' creative activity 
by the Purples and Golds, the two sides into which the student body is 
divided. Student leaders and assistant leaders meeting the required 
qualifications are elected by popular vote of the student body. Alter- 
nately, they choose sides, select their writers, costumers, staging crews, 
composers and employ all the talents of their particular group. 

Each side writes, composes, directs and stages the dramatizations 
and songs. An atmosphere of intense rivalry and closest secrecy pre- 
vails over the campus from the time sides are chosen until the decision 
of the judges is heard. 

This event, which began as a modest observance of Washington's 
Birthday by the four classes, has grown until it now attracts to the 
campus over three thousand visitors annually. It falls on Friday and 
Saturday nights in February nearest Washington's Birthday. 



29 
SPECIAL SERVICES 
CONCERTS, LECTURES, AND PLAYS 

Each year distinguished speakers, lecturers, and artists appear be- 
fore the students and faculty in Palmer Auditorium. Many of these 
programs are presentations of the Concert and Lecture Course; others 
are arranged for the weekly convocations, and for special occasions of 
the College and of Montevallo civic organizations. These attractions 
are in addition to the plays, concerts, and lectures by theatre groups, 
music and dance groups, and individuals within the College. 

DANCY LECTURES 

The Dancy Lectures are made possible through a bequest of 
$12,500 by Miss Unity Dandridge Dancy, of Morgan County, Ala- 
bama, honoring her mother. In her will Miss Dancy stated that her 
gift was to "endow the Departments of English, Literature and Ex- 
pression" at Alabama College. 

This statement of purpose by Miss Dancy has been interpreted to 
mean that the Dancy Fund shall be used to extend or supplement the 
services of the English and Speech Departments of the College. The 
income from the endowment will be used to support a series of lectures 
devoted to an examination of some aspect of Southern culture today 
and in its historical perspective. Every second year a scholar-critic of 
recognized authority will be invited to present, in a series of lectures 
delivered at the College, the results of original research and fresh criti- 
cism on some phase of Southern life and letters. 

The first series of Dancy Lectures was given at Alabama College 
in April 1939, by Dr. Douglas Southall Freeman, distinguished editor, 
biographer, and research scholar. Dr. Freeman, whose four-volume life 
of R. E. Lee was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1934, spoke on "The 
South to Posterity: a Review of Southern Historical Literature." 

These lectures were incorporated in a book by this name which 
Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, published. 

The second series of Dancy Lectures was delivered in 1941 by 
Lewis Mumford who spoke on "Southern Architecture." These lectures 
are now available in a book entitled "The South in Architecture," pub- 
lished by Harcourt, Brace, New York. 

On account of war conditions the third series of Dancy Lectures 
scheduled for April, 1943, was postponed. 

The 1945 series was delivered in April by Dr. Francis P. Gaines, 
President of Washington and Lee University. His subject was "A Study 



30 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

in Idealism." The lectures were published by the University of Alabama 
Press, December, 1946. 

The 1947 series was delivered by Dr. Mitford M. Mathews, lec- 
turer, author, editor, in charge of the Dictionary Office of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago Press. His subject was "The Sources of Certain 
Southernisms." The lectures are being published by the University of 
Alabama Press. 

EXTENSION SERVICE 

Among the services of the College conducted through the Educa- 
tion Department is the Extension Service, directed by Dr. M. L. Orr, 
head of the Department of Education. At various centers over the state, 
extension courses are offered to teachers, club women, and others when 
requested by groups of sufficient size. Under certain conditions these 
courses carry college credit. 

Upon request, the President of the College or the Director of 
Extension will arrange for members of the regular faculty to render 
service as lecturers or musicians in various parts of the state. 

CLUB SERVICE 

Alabama College, as the State College for Women, accepts its full 
share of responsibility for providing educational and cultural oppor- 
tunities for Alabama. Through Club Service, directed by Julia McEachin 
Lee, Alabama College carries its program to the women of the state. 
This service offers to any and all clubs of the state program outlines 
covering a year's work in some fifty or sixty fields. If any club or in- 
dividuaj. club member wishes to prepare a special program or series of 
programs the trained staff of Club Service at Alabama College stands 
ready to look up materials and submit bibliographies and suggested 
readings for such programs. All programs are serviced with reference 
material from Alabama College Library. This service is given without 
any charge other than postage on the material sent out. The various 
programs and services of Club Service are described in a special bulle- 
tin which will be sent upon request. 

HOME STUDY SERVICE 

For the benefit of those who cannot study on the campus, Alabama 
College through Home Study offers certain regular college credit 
courses by correspondence. These courses cover the same material and 
carry the same credit as if done in residence. A special bulletin describ- 
ing correspondence courses is available on request. Mr. Frank N. Phil- 
pot is director of this service. 

PLACEMENT BUREAU 

The Placement Bureau, directed by Professor A. C. Anderson, 
serves students and former students of Alabama College without 



SPECIAL SERVICES 31 

charge. The Placement Bureau is interested both in supplying teachers 
to the schools of the state and in placing graduates in non-teaching 
positions. Confidential information about each prospective employee is 
carefully collected by the Placement Bureau and made avadabie to 
employers only. 

DRAMA SERVICE 

Drama Service is prepared to offer personal assistance in the se- 
lection of a play, in the preparation of an original script, or in techni- 
cal production problems. Housed on the third floor of Comer Hall, 
Drama Service provides thousands of plays, both published and in 
manuscript, radio material, children's plays^ operettas, pageants, books 
on scenic and costume designs and other technical books. The director 
is prepared also to give personal counsel on production, including di- 
recting, casting, rehearsals, and technical details. The facilities of Dra- 
ma Service are available to any group in the state, free, except for 
postage charges. 

VOCATIONAL ADVISORY SERVICE 

The Vocational Advisory Service was established in 1940 as a part 
of the extension service offered by the College. In 1944 its full ser- 
vices were also made available to students-in-residence at Alabama Col- 
lege. In general, the function of the Vocational Advisory Service is to 
arouse interest in, and seek solutions for, the vocational problems of 
Alabama women. Its services are available to individual women, to 
high schools, and to women's organizations which are planning or 
conducting active programs of vocational guidance. An extensive ref- 
erence library of vocational literature is maintained. Research is con- 
ducted on special problems related to the vocational adjustments of 
Alabama women. The Vocational Advisory Service cooperates with all 
agencies active in the field of vocational guidance and training. No 
direct placement work is done, but assistance is rendered to those de- 
siring employment through suggestions of contacts and techniques of 
seeking employment. 

SPEECH CLINIC SERVICE 

The Department of Speech maintains a clinic for the students of 
the College with speech disorders, such as stuttering, lisping, cleft 
palate problems, voice problems, foreign accent, articulatory inaccura- 
cies, etc. Voice recordings are made and individual corrective programs 
set up. Instructors in all departments ase urged to advise students with 
defective speech to avail themselves of the services of the clinic. 

The clinic is also available to any person in the state with defec- 
tive speech. An appointment may be made for diagnosis by writing 
the Head of the Speech Department. 



32 

ORGANIZATIONS 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF ALABAMA COLLEGE 

The Alumnae Association of Alabama College, organized in 1902, 
promotes the welfare of the College and the alumnae by increasing the 
interest of members in the College and in each other. 

Active membership is open to any former student of the College 
on annual contribution ($2.00 minimum) to the Alumnae Fund. This 
amount covers membership in the organization plus a year's subscrip- 
tion to the College newspaper, The Alahamian. 

The work of the Association is conducted through the Executive 
Board, composed of four officers and the standing committees, and the 
Faculty-Alumnae Committee which serves in an advisory capacity to 
the Alumnae Secretary. 

The Association officers for the 1946-48 term are: President, Mrs. 
Alton B. Parker (Ruth Scott, '31), 1031-26th Street, South, Birming- 
ham 5; Vice-President, Mrs. T. Howard Jones (Frances Douglas, 
*39), 1401 South Perry Street, Montgomery; Secretary, Mrs. E. H. Wil- 
son (Louise Lovelady, '45), Montevallo; Treasurer, Miss Ethel Harris, 
'30, Montevallo; Chairman of the Scholarship Committee, Miss Fran- 
ces Fuller, '31, 22071/2 Highland Avenue, Birmingham; Chairman of 
Alumnae Fund Committee, Mrs. John I. Waites (Pattie Upchurch, '39), 
1218 Cleveland Road, Montgomery. 

The following are Alumnae Chapter Presidents and Key-Alumnae 
of Alumnae Groups: 

Abbeville, Henry County, Mrs. Arthur Tiller (Hilda A. Dixon, '39). 
Mrs. Ralph Killebrew. 

Alexander City, Tallapoosa County, Mrs. J. Lemuel Coley (Celia Light- 
foot, '44). 

Aliceville, Pickens County, Mrs. Simon Jones (Allene McFarland, 
Ex-'20). 

America, Walker County, Mrs. J. T. Foreman (Ruth Gnffin, Ex-'20). 

Anniston, Mrs. Franklin Williamson, Redding Apts. 

Andalusia, Covington County, Mrs. John D. Searcy (Louise Cotney, 

Athens, Limestone County, Mrs. John Nelson (Martina Nelson, '42). 
Atmore, Escambia County, Mrs. George Heard (Mary Curtis, '43). 
Auburn, Lee County, Mrs. Paul M. Norton (Kathleen DeShazo, *17). 



ORGANIZATIONS 33 

Autaugaville, Autauga County, Mrs. R. Gordon Shanks (Margaret Al- 
len, '42). 

Bay Minette, Baldwin County, Mrs. P. M. Mason (Emma Alison, '34). 

Bessemer, Jefferson County, Mrs. Theron A. McCrimmon (Mildred 
Moore, '40). 

Birmingham, Jefferson County, Mrs. Fred E. Vann (Mary Diamond, 
'40), 2731 Highland Avenue. Miss Teresa Thomas, '34, 419 S. 80th 
Street. 

Clanton, Chilton County, Mrs. A. B. Foshee (Mary Lou Tiffin, '33). 

Collinsville, DeKalb County, Mrs. Gordon Black (Blanche McElroy, 
'38). Mrs. Grady Porter (Mary I. Kerr, '34). 

Crossville, DeKalb County, Miss Velma Jordan, '40. 

Cullman, Cullman County, Miss Bessie Mae Young, '31. Miss Ruth 
Weaver, '39. 

Deatsville, Elmore County, Mrs. E. C. Merritt (Mary Main, '28). 

Decatur, Morgan County, Miss Mary Louise Garrett, '37. Miss Con- 
stance Peerson, 'AA. 

Demopolis, Marengo County, Mrs. Hoyt A. Talley (Dionetta Kroell, 
•27). 

Dothan, Houston County, Miss Jane Flurry, '43. 

Eldridge, Fayette County, Miss Marie Hollingsworth, '45. 

Eufaula, Barbour County, Mrs. Merle Lunsford Taylor, '47. Mrs. E. W. 
Vance (Mary McCool, '41). 

Eutaiv, Greene County, Mrs. W. L. Martin, Jr. (Vivian Ferrell, '12). 
Mrs. Bain Hamilton (Rachel Brodnax, '31). 

Florence, Lauderdale County, Mrs. C. W. Trotter (Jane Wadsworth, 
Ex-'36), 4231/2 North Pine Street. 

Fort Payne, DeKalb County, Mrs. N. T. Gilbreath (Sara Weatherly, 
'32). 

Frisco City, Monroe County, Mrs. J. N. Youngblood (Elsie Galloway, 
'34). 

Fyffe, DeKalb County, Mrs. M. H. Moses (Azalia Painter, '33). 

Gadsden, Etowah County, Miss Anne Rinehart, '44, Rainbow Drive. 

Greensboro, Hale County, Miss Frances A. Selden, '25. Mrs. John 
Lowery. 



34 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Greenville, Butler County, Mrs. F. M. Zeigler (Edith Nettles, '31). 

Guntersville, Marshall County, Alice Bradford, '35, 739 Blount Street. 

HancevHle, Cullman County, Mrs. Albert Burkhart (Elizabeth W. 
Shepard, '24). 

HuntsvHle, Madison County, Mrs. J. S. Gowan (Miriam Dunn, '36), 
511 McClung Street. Mrs. John Lary (Aline Blair, '35), 514 Bonita 
Circle. 

Hurtsboro, Russell County, Miss Eugenia Ferrell, Ex-'40, Seale. 

Jackson, Clarke County, Mrs. J. F. McVay (Azile Norris, '31). 

Jasper, Walker County, Miss Jeannette McPhail, '38. 

Jemison, Chilton County, Miss Paralee Henson, '41. 

LaPayette, Chambers County, Mrs. Britt Higgins (Addie Pearl Lee, 
'22). Miss Ruth Schuessler, '38. 

Marion, Perry County, Mrs. W. E. Lake (Emma Avant, '13). Miss 
Jean Lake, '46. 

Mobile, Mobile County, Mrs. B. W. Hilburn (Juanita Howell, '36), 
1453 MacArthur St. 

Monroeville, Monroe County, Mrs. L W. Agee (Dorothy Dunn, '40). 

Montgomery, Montgomery County, Miss Thelma Jones, '44, 318 Ad- 
ams Street. Miss Ann Boyd, '44, 624 Mildred Street. 

Moundville, Hale County, Mrs. Carroll E. Chancey (Ruby Jo Patton, 
•36). 

Oneonta, Blount County, Mrs. B. M. Baines (Mattie B. Stone, '22). 

Opelika, Lee County, Mrs. F. A. Vernon (Julia B. McDonald, '01). 
Mrs. Judson Salter (Lucy Holcombe, '30), 415 3rd Avenue. 

Opp, Covington County, Mrs. Claude G. Wright (Myrtle Plant, '28). 
Mrs. V. L. St. John (Virginia Dare Thomas, '27). 

Ozark, Dale County, Mrs. Charles Lisenby (Miriam Carroll, '36). 

Pine Apple, Wilcox County, Mrs. M. F. Jackson, Jr. (Georgia Wil- 
liamson, '18). 

Prattville, Autauga County, Mrs. Leonard Wadsworth (Aileen Jones, 
'32). Miss Georgia Hill, '34. 

Roanoke, Randolph County, Mrs. DeWitt T. Ware (Marchie Frances 
Sewell, '15). Miss Mary Neal James, '38. 



ORGANIZATIONS 35 

Russell vHle, Franklin County, Mrs. Jack N. Floyd (Mary Hood, '33). 

Selma, Dallas County, Mrs. Roswell Falkenberry (Eleanor Rennie, '30), 
522 Broad St. 

Sylacauga, Talladega County, Mrs. Essie Pinnell Creel, '41, Box 300. 

Dallas see, Elmore County, Miss Lorene Andrews, '46, Box 25, East 
Tallassee. 

Trussville, Jefferson County, Mrs. John Paul Watts (Emy Kirkley, '36), 
3 Pine Street. 

W infield, Marion County, Miss Irdine Shirey, '23. 

OUT OF STATE KEY ALUMNAE 

Tucson, Arizona, Miss Opal Gibson, '39, 340 E. 22nd Street. 

Washington, D. C, Mrs. Paul Keen (Sarah Howell, '33), Glenn Dale, 

Maryland. 

Miami, Florida, Mrs. L. M. Voltz (Jeanne Appleton, '42), 4600 S. E. 
5th Street. 

Baltimore, Maryland, Miss Beulah Putnam, '26, 346 E. University 
Parkway. 

Chattanooga, Tennessee, Miss Nancy Adele Simmons, '47, 3415 Mont- 
view Drive. 

Knoxville, Tennessee, Miss Sarah Cartwright, '43, Sterchi Apt. 22. 
NATIONAL HONORARY SOCIETIES 

Alpha Lambda Delta 

Alpha Lambda Delta is a national honorary fraternity for fresh- 
men women. The purpose of Alpha Lambda Delta is to foster intelli- 
gent living and to promote interest in scholarship among freshmen 
women at Alabama College. 

Only freshmen who have made a grade point average of 2.5 for 
their first semester or their first two semesters in college are eligible 
for membership. 

Beta Beta Beta 

Beta Iota Chapter of Beta Beta Beta, national honorary biological 
fraternity, was installed at the College in March, 1940. Its purpose 
is to promote scholarship and to stimulate interest in scientific research. 



36 alabama college 

Delta Phi Alpha 

Mu Chapter of Delta Phi Alpha, national honorary fraternity 
which recognizes excellence in German, was established at the College 
in 1931. 

Its purposes are to promote high scholarship; to stimulate the 
study of the German language, literature, and civilization; to improve 
understanding of the German-speaking people; to foster an apprecia- 
tion of German culture. 

Kappa Delta Pi 

Beta Lambda Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, national honorary edu- 
cation society, was installed at the College in 1929. In fostering fellow- 
ship, scholarship, and achievement in education work, it seeks to 
encourage among its member a higher degree of social service. 

Kappa Mu Epsilon 

Alabama Gamma Chapter of Kappa Mu Epsilon, national honor- 
ary mathematics fraternity, was installed at Alabama College in April, 
1937. Its purpose is to recognize and foster scholarship in mathematics, 
and to bring together groups of students in this and other colleges 
who are interested in the subject. 

Kappa Pi 

Kappa Pi is a national honorary fraternity in art. Its purpose is 
to develop an appreciation and understanding of art for everyone and 
to support the work of the creative artist. 

Students eligible are juniors and seniors who have maintained 
an average of B in art and maintained a scholastic average of at least 
C outside of art. 

^ Lambda Sigma Pi 

Lambda Sigma Pi, a senior women's honorary society, recognizes 
each year the seniors who have shown outstanding leadership, service, 
and personality on the campus. 

This society was organized on Alabama College campus in 1940. 
Its purpose is to serve the College in every possible way. 

Mu Delta Alpha 

Mu Delta Alpha, an honorary fraternity in Spanish, was organized 
at the College in 1943. It seeks to create a better understanding of 
Spanish and Spanish speaking countries. 



organizations 37 

National Collegiate Players 

The thirtieth chapter of National Collegiate Players, honorary 
dramatic fraternity, was installed at the College in 1936. Its purpose 
is the affiliation of college groups for improvement by individual, 
group, or national effort in any phase of dramatic technique or dramatic 
literature. 

Omicron Nu 

Omicron Nu is the national honorary society for Home Econo- 
mics. It recognizes scholarship, leadership and research in this field. 
Alpha Gamma Chapter was installed at the College in 1931. Member- 
ship is awarded to senior and second semester junior majors in Home 
Economics, in the upper one-fifth of their classes, who have a grade 
point average of not less than 2.00, and who show promise of leader- 
ship in the field of Home Economics. 

Pi Delta Epsilon 

Pi Delta Epsilon is a national honorary fraternity in journalism. 
Membership may be obtained by showing outstanding work for at 
least one year on one of the three student publications. Pi Delta 
Epsilon, formerly Alpha Chi Alpha, was established on the campus 
during the summer of 1944, through a merger with the larger fra- 
ternity. 

Pi Delta Phi 

Lambda Chapter of Pi Delta Phi, national honorary French fra- 
ternity, was installed at the College in 1936. It seeks to stimulate 
scholarship in French. Its membership is open to students who have 
completed a minimum of eight semester hours in advanced French 
courses, and who have also maintained an average of B in general 
scholarship. 

Pi Kappa Delta 

Alabama Beta Chapter of Pi Kappa Delta, national honorary 
forensic society, was installed at the College in 1934. Its purpose is 
to promote intercollegiate debate, oratory, and public speaking. Mem- 
bership is awarded for successful participation in debating, oratory, 
public discussion, and other public speaking activities. 

Sigma Alpha Sigma 

Gamma Chapter of Sigma Alpha Sigma, national honorary secre- 
tarial science fraternity, was installed at the college in 1941. Its purpose 
is to foster closer relationship between the secretary and the profes- 
sional world, and to encourage and recognize high scholarship. 



38 alabama college 

Zeta Phi Eta 

Rho Chapter of Zeta Phi Eta, national honorary professional 
speech arts fraternity, was installed at the College in 1934. It seeks 
to build professional philosophy and to stimulate worthy speech and 
dramatic enterprises. 

OTHER STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Alabama Players 

Alabama Players, an honorary dramatic organization, selects its 
members on the basis of activity in dramatic productions. 

The three steps to membership are designated as circles. The 
first circle requires eight points to be made in two fields of activity 
relative to dramatic production. The second circle may be acquired 
through achievement of fourteen points in three fields of activity. The 
highest circle, or full membership, may be secured by achievement 
of twenty points in four fields of activity. 

Art Club 

The Art Club is composed of students with a major in art, and 
a group of associate members particularly interested in this field. 

The Association For Childhood Education 

The Association for Childhood Education has the belief that a 
democratic way of living offers the best opportunity for human de- 
velopment that the world knows at present. Membership in the A. 
C. E. offers an avenue through which the faculty and students can 
practice democratic living consistently and completely by recognizing 
and accepting responsibilities; by facing life in a straightforward, 
courageous way; by abiding by decisions which have been developed 
through group action; by making personal sacrifices for the welfare 
of the community; and by defending all children regardless of color, 
race, or creed. 

Biology Club 

The Biology Club is open to all students in this field and to 
other students especially interested in this subject. Its purpose is to 
open new vistas into the world of nature and to give a deeper apprecia- 
tion of the great scientists. 

Calkins Music Study Club 

The Calkins Music Study Club is designed to promote the social 
enjoyment of its members and to aid in the stimulation of general 



ORGANIZATIONS 3S> 

music appreciation on the campus. An associate group is open by 
invitation to any student. 

College Theatre 

The College Theatre, established in 1929, seeks to provide a 
theatre for the college and the community, a means of self-expression 
for the students, and training for students in various phases of dramatic 
art. 

It is the policy of the Theatre to produce both the great dramatic 
classics, and new works, particularly those of Southern writers. 

Among the more important plays that the Theatre has produced 
are the following: Beggar on Horseback, Antigone, The Importance 
of Being Earnest, The Assumption of Hannele, Much Ado About 
Nothing, The Imaginary Invalid, Bonds of Interest, The Chalk Circle, 
The Knight of the Burning Pestle, The Women Have Their Way, 
Iphigenia in Tauris, Well of the Saints, The Barber of Seville, The 
Faithful, Hobson's Choice, The Fan, Dear Brutus, High Tor, The 
Bourgeois Gentleman, R. U. R., The Beautiful People, Tomorrow The 
World, The Ivory Door. 

In addition, the Theatre has produced, or has been instrumental 
in having produced, twenty-seven plays by Southern authors. 

Dance Group 

The Dance Group is an honorary group made up of students 
particularly interested in Modern Dance. 

Membership in the Dance Group is gained through try-outs based 
on rhythmic ability, ability to execute dance movements, and ability to 
improvise and compose dance sequences. To be eligible to try-out for 
the group, students must have had at least one semester of Modern 
Dance, or its equivalent. 

Dietetics Club 

The Dietetics Club, organized in March, 1937, is open to any 
student interested in dietetics. A study program is combined with a 
social one, and includes a project of community service, selected and 
carried out by club members. 

French Club 

Le Cercle Francais was organized in 1928. Its purpose is to 
broaden appreciation of French culture. Membership is open to all 
students interested in the language. The Club is affiliated as a Cercle 
Universitaire with the Federation de L'alliance aux Etats-Unis et au 
Canada. 



40 alabama college 

Glee Club 

The Glee Club stimulates interest in ensemble singing and offers 
opportunity for study of choral music of all periods and schools. 
Membership in the Glee Club proper is based primarily on the record 
of faithfulness to the work of the Associate Club, which is open to 
all students without examination. Concerts are given locally and on 
tours each year. 

IvoL Spafford Club 

The home economics club was one of the first college clubs in 
the state to affiliate itself with the American Home Economics Asso- 
ciation. It seeks to promote a social spirit, to stimulate interest in the 
field, and to develop leadership and a professional attitude among its 
members. In the spring of 1942 it took the name of the Ivol Spafford 
Club in honor of the former Supervisor of Home Economics Educa- 
tion for the State of Alabama. 

Intercolleglvte Speaking Contests 

Within recent years the Alabama College debaters, extempore 
speakers, and orators have won a National Championship, a Provincial 
Championship, a championship of the South, and a championship in 
impromptu speaking. 

They have travelled nearly 40,000 miles in twenty-seven states; 
participated in tournaments in Houston, Texas; Atlanta, Georgia; Du- 
rant, Oklahoma; and Georgetown, Kentucky. Any regularly enrolled 
student is eligible to try out for oratory, extempore speaking, or debate. 
Membership in Pi Kappa Delta is awarded for successful participation 
in these activities. 

International Relations Club 

The International Relations Club, organized under the auspices 
of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, is open to all 
students interested in discussion of world affairs. It meets on the first 
and third Wednesday of each month. 

Music Council 

The object of the Music Council is to promote cooperation among 
campus musical organizations and the cause of good music on the cam- 
pus. 

Orchestra 

Membership in the orchestra is open to all students in the College. 
A limited number of instruments owned by the College arc available 
for those students not owning their own instruments. 



ORGANIZATIONS 4l 



Physical Education Club 



The Physical Education Club is composed of students with a 
major in this field. In its efforts to stimulate interest and develop 
professional and social spirit among its members, the Club cooperates 
with the Physical Education Department. 

Presidents' Council 

The Presidents' Council is a coordinating body composed of the 
presidents of all student organizations on the campus. It reviews ap- 
plications for new student organizations, evaluating their constitution 
and by-laws and if acceptable, approves them for organizations. It 
formulates and promotes the point system for non-curricular activities 
and arranges the yearly calendar and weekly schedule for student 
activities. 

Publications Board 

The Publications Board is composed of representatives of the 
four College classes, elected by the student body. Its purpose is to 
determine all general policies pertaining to each of the student publi- 
cations; elect staff members for these publications; approve contracts 
entered into by these publications; and administer their finances. 

Recreation Association 

The Recreation Association of Alabama College is closely identified 
with the Department of Health and Physical Education. The Associa- 
tion offers an opportunity for each student to participate in the fol- 
lowing intramural tournaments in the order listed: tenniquoit, volley 
ball, soccer, basketball, softbali, tennis, swimming, and archery. A 
year-round recreation program consisting of seasonal, individual and 
team sports, hikes, dances, and parties is sponsored by the organization. 
Its purposes are to promote the health, recreation, and friendship of 
students; to create a joyous interest in play; and to stimulate the highest 
type of college spirit. 

The College Camp, available for use of all students and faculty 
members, was planned by the Association, and its executive board has 
responsibility for the maintenance of the Camp House. 

Retail Club 

The Retail Club was organized to give the retail students social 
poise and a professional attitude. The Club meets monthly for pro- 
grams prepared by the members. Speakers from the field of retailing 
are invited each year to speak to the students. 

Each fall the Club sponsors a contest to select the ten best-dressed 
girls on the campus, stressing good grooming and suitable and be- 



42 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

coming costumes. The contest is closed with a dance sponsored and 
managed by the Club members. 

Secretarml Club 

The Secretarial Club was organized in 1942 to foster fellowship 
in the department and to promote business efficiency and interest in 
secretarial work. Membership is open to all students in this depart- 
ment. 

Sociology Club 

The purposes of the Sociology Club are to arouse and foster an 
interest in the art of helping people, to familiarize the members with 
the scope and nature of social work, and to widen the social contacts 
of students interested in sociology. 

Speech Chorus 

Membership in the Speech Chorus is gained through tryouts based 
first on speaking voice quality and possibilities, and second, on inter- 
pretative ability derived from a background of experience in literature. 
Programs are given locally and on tour. 

Student Government Assocl\tion 

Confident that when students assume the responsibility for their 
own conduct as members of a democratic college community higher 
standards of citizenship and character will be maintained, the President 
and faculty of Alabama College delegate to the Student Government 
Association the responsibility to maintain the best conditions for 
scholarly work and wholesome and gracious living. This responsibility 
is vested in the Student Executive Board and the Student Senate; 
each body composed of representatives of the four College classes 
elected by the student body. 

Young Women's Christl\n Assocl\tion 

The Young Women's Christian Association endeavors to create 
a spirit of friendliness and fellowship throughout the student body. It 
is the unifying religious force on the campus and through the Re- 
ligious Council, which it sponsors, it tries to coordinate the work of 
other religious bodies on the campus and to meet any religious needs 
which are not met by other religious organizations. Through its Sun- 
day afternoon vesper services, its daily devotional services, and Re- 
ligious Emphasis Week it tries to develop a religious spirit on the campus. 

As a service organization the Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion sponsors Sis-Major assistance to new students on the campus, the 
College Tea Room, and a scholarship fund to which is given seventy- 
five per cent of the tea room profits. 



PUBLICATIONS 43 

The Association is affiliated with the National Young Women's 
Christian Association and is a member of the Southern Region. It is 
also affiliated with the National Intercollegiate Christian Council and 
the World Student Christian Federation. 

PUBLICATIONS 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Alabamian, the College newspaper, was first published in 
1923 and is issued twice monthly during the regular session. Copies 
are delivered to all students and sent to their homes, the cost being 
covered by the student activities fee. The subscription rate for others 
is $1 per year. 

Montage, the yearbook of the College, was first published in 
1907. Each student receives a copy, the cost of which is covered by 
the special fee of $2.50 payable at the opening of the session. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

The Bulletin: The College issues quarterly the Bulletin, a 
publication containing matter of general and specific interest to the 
citizens of the State, prospective students, and the College as a whole. 

The News Letters: The monthly News Letter carries announce- 
ments of specific services of the College, and information of general 
educational interest. 

The Weekly Bulletin: This weekly publication serves as a 
calendar of campus activities, and is circulated among students and 
faculty only. 

The Student Handbook: The handbook is published each year 
by the Student Government Association. It contains the traditions and 
regulations of the College and is given to all students. 

The Student-Faculty Directory: The Directory, published at 
the beginning of each school year, lists students and faculty. Students' 
names are followed by a numeral indicating their class, their home 
address, their Montevallo address, and their religious preference. Of- 
fice, home address, and telephone numbers of the faculty are shown. 



44 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT, SCHOLARSHIPS, 
AND LOANS 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

Approximately two hundred students earn part of their college 
expenses through some form of student employment on the campus by 
work in the dormitories, dining halls, college offices, and departments. 

To qualify for continued employment a student must maintain a 
scholarship average of not less than "C". She must also meet the re- 
quirements of good college citizenship. A student accepting part-time 
employment must meet the qualifications and adhere to the assigned 
duties exactly as in the case of full-time employees. 

The College, through the Office of the Student Counselor, under- 
takes general supervision of the remunerative work done by students. 
Students interested in student employment should secure the necessary 
application blank and file their applications in the Office of the Student 
Counselor not later than May first. 

GIFT SCHOLARSHIPS 

The scholarship policy of Alabama College is based on the recogni- 
tion of the scholarly achievements of its students and on the interest 
of the College in opening the way to excellent students, many of whom 
are not otherwise able to meet their entire college expenses. 

Scholarships are available to students of all classes. They are 
awarded on the basis of academic achievement and standing in the 
college community. Financial need is considered in awarding many of 
the scholarships. 

The Committee on Scholarships studies the academic records, the 
recommendations, and other pertinent information in an effort to 
allocate the scholarships in line with this policy. The Committee may 
require applicants for scholarships to take achievement tests or other 
examinations. 

Applications for scholarships should be directed to the Student 
Counselor, who is Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and 
Loans. 

Alabama College Alumnae Assocl\tion Gift Scholarship. 

The Alumnae Association in May, 1943, created four gift scholar- 
ships of $50.00 each to be awarded to incoming members of the fresh- 
man class on the basis of leadership, scholastic ability, and general 
well-rounded personality. The recipients are selected by the Alumnae 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND EMPLOYMENT 45 

Association Scholarship Committee upon recommendation of the Col- 
lege Scholarship Committee. 

American Legion Auxiliary Scholarship. 

The Alabama Department of the American Legion Auxiliary 
established at Alabama College in 1940 one scholarship of $100.00 
per year for daughters of World War veterans. An applicant must 
submit proof of her father's honorable discharge from the Army, 
transcript of her scholastic record in high school or college, health 
certificate, testimonials concerning character, worthiness and need of 
assistance. The Scholarship offered by the Alabama Department is 
restricted to young women who are residents of the State. 

Application should be made to the State President of the Ameri- 
can Legion Auxiliary, or to the State Chairman of the Scholarship 
Committee. 

Detailed information will be supplied upon request by the Student 
Counselor, Alabama College. 

Georgia Emma Douglass Scholarship. 

This scholarship was founded in the year 1946 through the gift 
of $750.00 to the College by Miss Lila Fundaburk, a former student 
of the College. The first amount was matched by a gift of $750.00 
from Ralph B. Douglass, of Norfolk, Virginia. The principal of the 
scholarship fund aggregates $1,500.00. The interest on this sum as it 
accumulates in amounts of not less than $75.00 will be available to a 
student entering or enrolled in any class of Alabama College. The 
awards from time to time will be made by the President of the College 
or by his duly delegated representative. It is hoped by the donors of 
this fund that the promotion of educational opportunities for women 
will stimulate a keener sensitivity toward the responsibilities attendant 
upon good citizenship in the community, nation, and world. 

Kellogg Foundation Scholarship. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek, Michigan, in 1943 
granted the specific amount of $2,000.00 to Alabama College to be 
used for scholarships for students in medical technology. Gifts from 
this fund are available to the students after they have completed at 
least 119 semester hours of college work, and have been accepted by 
a certified and approved hospital for clinical training. 

LiNLY Heflin Scholarships. 

The Linly Heflin Unit, of Birmingham, Alabama, a civic and 
philanthropic organization sponsoring education for young women, 
offers annually several gift scholarships at Alabama College. These 



46 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

scholarships are available to students in the State with superior scholas- 
tic and exemplary citi2enship records. 

Detailed information will be supplied upon request by the Stu- 
dent Counselor, Alabama College. 

LovEMAN, Joseph and Loeb Scholarship. 

Since the year 1939-1940 Loveman, Joseph and Loeb, of Birming- 
ham, has provided a cash scholarship of $100.00 for a sophomore 
who during her freshman year has completed satisfactory requirements 
in the clothing, textile and art subjects in the School of Home 
Economics. A similar scholarship for the year 1948-1949 will be 
provided for a sophomore who shall have met the necessary require- 
ments as a freshman during the year 1947-1948. 

Lucy Harper Hall Scholarship. 

In 1927 the late Mrs. J. B. Hall donated $2,500.00 to establish 
the Lucy Harper Hall Scholarship, the income from the sum to be 
used at Alabama College annually as two gift scholarships. 

Lucy Monk Scholarship. 

The Lucy Monk Scholarship was named in honor of the first 
woman to be placed on the Presbyterian Synod's Committee in Ala- 
bama. Mrs. Monk was named a member of the Executive Committee 
of the Presbyterian Home for Children, Talladega, on account of her 
active interest in that institution. This scholarship, given from the 
Blessing Box Fund of Alabama Synodical, is always awarded to a 
student from the Presbyterian Home for Children. 

M. V. Joseph Scholarship. 

This scholarship was founded in 1935 through the gift of 
$2,500.00 to the College by Mrs. Rosalie Joseph Leventritt, of Chicago, 
Illinois, in memory of her father, the late M. V. Joseph, a former 
member of the Board of Trustees. The interest on this sum is available 
for scholarships to students throughout the College course. Recipients 
must maintain satisfactory scholastic standing and exemplary citizenship 
records. Only graduates of Birmingham high schools are eligible. They 
should apply to the College. Appointments are made on the recom- 
mendation of the Superintendent of Birmingham Schools. 

Pepsi-Cola Scholarships for High School Seniors. 

The Pepsi-Cola Scholarship Board awards each year over one 
hundred Four-Year College Scholarships to seniors in high schools 
throughout the United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Each 
scholarship pays full tuition and required fees for four years, plus 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND EMPLOYMENT 47 

an allowance of $25.00 a month during the school year, and a travel 
allowance. Scholarships are allotted on a state basis. Winners select 
their own colleges. Information regarding these scholarships may be 
obtained from high school principals or directly from the Pepsi-Cola 
Scholarship Board, 532 Emerson Street, Palo Alto, California. 

RizPAH Dudley Memorial Scholarship. 

Miss Rizpah Dudley, for twenty years a supervisor in the training 
schools of the College and from the time of her retirement, June 1, 
1944, until her death. Supervisor Emeritus of the Training Schools, 
left in her will a bequest to the College of $2,000.00 to be used in 
perpetuity as a scholarship fund, the proceeds from the investment 
to be used from time to time as gift scholarships to worthy students. 

United Daughters of Confederacy Scholarships. 

The Alabama Division of the United Daughters of the Confed- 
eracy established at the College, through a fund of $5,000.00, four 
scholarships known as the Virginia Clopton scholarship, the Sallie 
Jones scholarship, the Minnie S. Mitchell scholarship, and the Lizzie 
Crenshaw scholarship. The income from this fund is available annually. 

Applicants must be residents of Alabama and descendants of Con- 
federate soldiers. Endorsements by the Alabama Division of United 
Daughters of the Confederacy scholarship committee and enrollment 
in a technical course are also required. Application should be made to 
Mrs. L. M. Bashinsky, Troy, Alabama. 

ALABAMA COLLEGE SOLICITS SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 

Public-spirited citizens and philanthropic organizations interested 
in the higher education of young women are invited to communicate 
with the College officials regarding endowing scholarships. Donors of 
the scholarships are given the full cooperation of the College in the 
management of the funds and in the selection of the recipients. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

The College has funds from which a student may borrow to help 
meet her college expenses. The loan funds are revolving funds so that 
the amount available at any one time depends upon the repayments of 
outstanding loans. Loans usually are made only to Juniors and Seniors, 
but occasionally to other students after their first year in College. 
Loans are subject to interest and repayment as specified by the donors. 

Applications for loans should be directed to the Student Counse- 
lor, who is Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and Loans. 



48 alabama college 

Alta Patterson Memorial Loan Fund. 

This loan was established during the 1928-1929 session by the 
faculty, and the friends and family of Miss Alta Patterson, who was 
a member of the home economics faculty until her death in 1928. The 
loan is available to the amount of $250.00 a year to seniors, juniors, 
and sophomores. Preference is given to upperclassmen. 

American Association of University Women Loan Fund. 

The Montevallo Branch of the American Association of Univer- 
sity Women has a fund of $125.00 for loan purposes. It is available 
to students who have better than "C" scholastic averages, and who are 
not in chronically poor health. Interest at three per cent is paid on the 
loans, beginning two years after graduation or withdrawal of the ap- 
pointees. Applications are received by the President of the College and 
are passed upon by the Executive Board of the Association. 

Carrie McClure Knox Memorl\l Loan Fund. 

This loan of $50.00, available to students from Anniston, Ala- 
bama, and vicinity, was established in 1935 by the Wednesday Study 
Club of that city as a tribute to its founder, the late Mrs. John B. 
Knox. 

Charles Rendell Calkins Loan Fund. 

The senior class of 1922 established this loan fund of $150.00 in 
memory of the late Charles Rendell Calkins, who was for seven years 
director of music at the College. It is available to seniors in the School 
of Music. 

College Night Loan Fund. 

This loan fund was established by the Student Government Asso- 
ciation during the years 1935-1945, inclusive, from the proceeds of 
College Night, an annual campus feature in which the entire student 
body participates. The loan is available to juniors and seniors who have 
shown exemplary citizenship and satisfactory scholastic records. 

Daughters of the American Revolution Loan Funds. 

David Lindsay Chapter, the local branch of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, has established a loan fund of $50.00. The Ala- 
bama Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, has also estab- 
lished a fund under the custodianship of the local chapter. 

The loans are available to seniors and juniors who have scholastic 
averages above "C" and good records in health and citizenship. They 
must be residents of Alabama. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND EMPLOYMENT 49 

Interest of two per cent is paid on the loans, beginning one year 
after graduation or withdrawal of the appointees. Applications are 
made to the President of the College and are passed upon by the Schol- 
arship Committee of the chapter. 

Federation of Women's Clubs Loan Funds. 

The Alabama Federation of Women's Clubs, at its third annual 
meeting in 1897 at Anniston, Alabama, began its active work for the 
College by contributing to a loan fund. 

In 1898 the Federation established the Kate Morizette Loan Fund, 
and in 1909 the Conra McConaughy Loan Fund. In 1911 the Federa- 
tion received a gift of $100.00 from Miss Francilla Romah Haley, of 
Jasper, to establish the Elizabeth Haley Moore Loan Fund. In 1916 
she increased this fund to $225.00. Other loan funds have been estab- 
lished as memorials to Kate Hagan, Marie Pearce, and Minnie Holman 
Phillips. 

All of these loans are not available annually but the Federation 
has made loans totaling several hundred dollars per year. Loan value 
to one recipient is limited to $200.00 per year. Recipients must be Ala- 
bama residents of high character and creditable scholarship. They must 
be qualified for the junior or senior college class. 

Alabama club women maintain several other loan funds which are 
subject to similar regulations. They are given by club districts, coun- 
ties, or individual clubs. 

Kellogg Foundation Loan Fund. 

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek, Michigan, in 1943 
granted Alabama College $2,000.00 to be used as loans for students 
majoring in Medical Technology. Students must have completed the 
first two years of college work with a satisfactory scholastic record, 
and must have exemplary citizenship records, to be eligible for a loan 
from this fund. 

Lettie Daffin Perdue Loan Fund. 

This loan fund, providing $50.00 annually for four years for an 
appointee, was established in 1943 by the Woman's Auxiliary of the 
Alabama State Medical Association in memory of the late Mrs. James 
Devote Perdue, of Mobile, who as Lettie Daffin graduated with honors 
from the College. She was at one time associate librarian at the College 
and in 1932 was elected president of the Woman's Auxiliary of the 
State Medical Association. 

As a tribute to Mrs. Perdue's unselfish service, the President of 
the College is authorized to make this loan to students of the State, 
and preferably to daughters of physicians. 



50 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

LiNLY Heflin Unit Loan Fund. 

The Linly Heflin Unit, of Birmingham, Alabama, a civic and 
philanthropic organization sponsoring education for young women, 
has certain funds which it makes available for educational loans to stu- 
dents at Alabama College. The loans are available to students in the 
State with superior scholastic and exemplary citizenship records. 

Detailed information will be supplied upon request by the Stu- 
dent Counselor, Alabama College. 

Mary Alice Mizell Loan Fund. 

This loan fund of $100.00, open to seniors, was established in 
1924 by the late Mary Alice Boyd, of the Department of Education at 
the College. In 1925 she increased the fund to $150.00. 

Mary Goode Stallworth Alumnae Loan Fund. 

The State Alumnae Association maintains a loan fund with which 
it assists members of the junior and senior classes. It is named in mem- 
ory of Miss Mary Goode Stallworth, a member of the faculty in the 
early history of the institution. 

Methodist Church Loan Fund. 

This fund is administered by the Board of Education of the 
Methodist Church and is available to a limited number of students 
who have been members of this denomination continuously for at least 
one year immediately preceding the application. Students who apply for 
this loan must be recommended by the official members of their home 
church, and must meet certain qualifications as to scholarship, charac- 
ter, and promise of usefulness. 

Detailed information will be supplied upon request by the Student 
Counselor, Alabama College. 

Montgomery Business and Professional Women's Club 
Loan Fund. 

The Business and Professional Women's Club, of Montgomery, 
Alabama, beginning with the year 1940-1941, provided $400.00 to be 
used as a revolving loan fund at Alabama College, preference to be 
given to Montgomery County girls of the junior and senior classes. 
The maximum for any holder is $100.00 a year. 

Music Council Loan Fund. 

In 1932 the Music Council at the College established a loan fund 
of $150.00 for students with a major in music. 

Myrtle Brooke Loan Fund. 

The first group of students in social work at Alabama College 
established a loan fund of $250.00 in the field of social work. It is an 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND EMPLOYMENT 51 

expression of appreciation of the contribution to the development of 
scientific social work in Alabama by the late Miss Myrtle Brooke through 
her service in establishing social work at the College. The fund thus 
pays tribute to the pioneer spirit of a teacher who is still loved and 
admired, and commemorates the first training course for social work- 
ers in the State. 

Opportunity Loan Fund. 

Mrs. Maud Preuitt Fennel, of Leighton, through Mr. C. M. Maul- 
din as trustee of the fund, granted $1,000 for the establishment of the 
Opportunity Loan Fund for the assistance of juniors and seniors. The 
maximum for any holder is $200.00 a year. 

•Special Loan Fund. 

The Sunday School Class of Mrs. T. H. Napier in Montevallo 
over a period of five years raised the funds to establish this loan fund 
of $100.00, offered first in the 1930-1931 session and open to seniors. 

Young Women's Christian Association Loan Fund. 

The Young Women's Christian Association operates a tea room 
at the College, providing employment for five or more students each 
session, and uses three-fourths of the profits of the tea room for in- 
creasing its loan fund. Small amounts may be borrowed from this fund 
by students, and repaid after their graduation or withdrawal. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

Pepsi-Cola Graduate Fellowship for College Seniors 

Pepsi-Cola Graduate Fellowships are awarded to outstanding Col- 
lege seniors in the United States. Each fellowship pays full tuition and 
$750.00 a year for three years. They may be used in any field of study 
at any accredited graduate school in the United States. Twenty-six 
three-year graduate fellowships, allotted on a regional basis, are award- 
ed each year. Detailed information may be obtained from the Dean of 
the College or directly from the Pepsi-Cola Scholarship Board, 532 
Emerson Street, Palo Alto, California. 

Alabama College Alumnae Loan Fund. 

The Alumnae Association maintains a loan fund to be used by 
graduates of the College who may desire financial assistance while 
pursuing their graduate studies. Not more than $300.00 may be bor- 
rowed by a student at any given time. The awards are made by the 
Alumnae Scholarship Committee. 

Graduate Study. 

The College encourages interested seniors and graduates to study 
for advanced degrees and actively assists them in securing scholarships 
-and fellowships offered by Universities and Foundations. 



52 



COST OF ATTENDANCE 



Session Semester 

Room, board, and laundry $292.50 $146.25 

♦College fee 120.00* 60.00* 

**Montage fee 2.50** 2.50** 

Total $415.00 $208.75 

Payments 

All charges are payable in advance in two installments on the first 
day of each semester as follows: 

September 13. Room, board, laundry, College fee, 

Montage fee $208.75 

January 31. Room, board, laundry, College fee 206.25 

Total for Session $415.00 

In addition to the above charges payable by all boarding students, 
fees for private music lessons and for private speech lessons are pay- 
able at the beginning of the semester. 

Each student will need to purchase books and other necessary sup- 
plies, which may be had at the College Supply Store. 

The rates above are for students who reside in Alabama and who 
attend for the entire semester. Special arrangements must be made with 
the Business Manager for any variation in this procedure of payment. 

Local Students 

Students residing in private homes do not pay room, board, and 
laundry. They pay all other fees at the beginning of the semester. 

Out-of-State Students 

Students from other states are charged an additional fee of $50.00 
each per session, payable in installments of $25.00 at the beginning 
of each semester. 

Late Registration 

No reduction in room, board, and laundry will be made for a 
student who enters the College within three weeks after the beginning 



*From this College fee, $4.50 per session is allocated to expense of Con- 
certs and Lectures and $7.50 per session to Student Activities. The 
College makes no separate charge for laboratory fees. 
**To be paid only once during the session. Students entering in Septem- 
ber will pay this fee the first semester and those entering in January 
will pay it the second semester. This charge is made in order that each 
student may have a copy of the College yearbook, Montage. 



COST OF ATTENDANCE 



53 



of the semester. Students may enter after the expiration of three weeks 
of the semester by special permission of the Dean, only, and for a lim- 
ited amount of work. They will be charged all fees for the semester 
and $1.25 per day for room, board, and laundry from entrance to the 
close of the semester. 

Musk Fees 

The following fees, with the exception of those headed Special 
Fees, are inclusive of all charges for music tuition, use of practice in- 
struments and theoretical studies. The regular fees are based on two 
half -hour lessons a week with the required practice. 

Courses Leading to Bachelor of Music Degree 

Session Semester 
All curricula $100.00 $ 50.00 

A special fee of $5.00 a semester is charged in Wind and String 
Pedagogy to cover the cost of maintenance on musical instruments. 

Fees for music are not refunded after a student begins lessons in 
piano, voice, violin, or organ. In case of continued illness of the stu- 
dent, the lessons missed are made up. 

Music Courses for Majors in Other Departments 

Session Semester 

Applied music, 2 lessons (private) $100.00 $ 50.00 

Applied music, 1 lesson (private) 56.00 28.00 

Applied music, 1 lesson (private without practice) 50.00 25.00 

Applied music, (class) 24.00 12.00 

Single lessons are $2.00 each. 

Speech Fees 

Session Semester 

Two individual lessons per week and practice $ 60.00 $ 30.00 

One individual lesson per week and practice 36.00 18.00 

Speech (Interpretation) 10.00 5.00 

Corrective Speech (if not registered student) 10.00 5.00 

Graduation Fee 

A graduation fee of $7.50 is charged all candidates for gradua- 
tion, and is payable in the last semester. 

Regulation Gymnasium Suit 

At the beginning of her first year each student is required to pur- 
chase a regulation gymnasium suit at the College Supply Store at an 
approximate cost of $4.00. 



54 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Withdrawal 

A student who resigns during any semester or summer term will 
submit her resignation in person or in writing to the Dean of Resi- 
dence, gvf'mg the reason therefor. In the absence of a formal resigna- 
tion in conformity with the foregoing requirement, no refund of any 
kind will be approved by the President of the College. 

Refund 

A student who withdraws before the completion of a semester is 
charged $1.25 per day for room, board, and laundry from the opening 
of the semester until the notice of her withdrawal is filed with the 
Dean of Residence. This sum is deducted from the total payment for 
room, board, and laundry, and the remainder is refunded. No refund 
of room, board, and laundry is made to the student who has been in 
residence for 108 days or more. 

If a student finds it necessary to withdraw at any time up to the 
end of the first two weeks, ninety per cent of the College Fee will be; 
refunded, but no refund of the fee will be made after that date. 

Changes in Charges 

The charges listed herein may be changed on the order of the 
Board of Trustees, either by way of increase or decrease, to be effec- 
tive at the beginning of any semester or summer session, provided, 
however, that students in residence shall be notified at least thirty days 
in advance of any such changes. 



55 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

I. Graduates of an Accredited High School. 

A graduate of an accredited high school may be admitted without 
examination by presenting a certificate of graduation showing credit 
for a minimum of fifteen acceptable units from a four-year school, or 
a minimum of eleven acceptable units from a three-year secondary 
school which required for admission the completion of a three-year 
junior high school program. 

The units offered for admission must include three units in Eng- 
lish, and not more than four of the fifteen from a four-year school, 
nor more than three of the eleven from the three-year school should 
be in vocational subjects. 

II. Students Who Are Not Graduates of an Accredited 
Secondary School. 

Graduates of non-accredited secondary schools and students who 
have attended accredited schools for a minimum of three years with- 
out graduation and present a certificate showing credit for fifteen ac- 
ceptable units may be admitted by examination. 

Entrance examinations for the 1948-1949 session will be given on 
Saturday morning, September 11, 1948. Application for the examina- 
tion must be filed in the office of the Dean of the College ten days 
before the opening of the session and the examination must be taken 
before the student completes registration. 

III. Special Students. 

Applicants twenty years of age or over who desire to pursue special 
courses may be admitted without formal examination, but must give 
evidence of adequate preparation to the Instruction Committee and to 
the heads of departments in which courses are sought. 

Special students cannot become candidates for degrees or apply 
for teachers' certificates until admission requirements have been met 
in full. 

In order for a special student to room in a dormitory she must 
take at least fourteen hours of work, six or more of which must be in 
non-vocational subjects, and must conform to all regulations governing 
other students. 

IV. Advanced Standing. 

A student may be admitted to advanced standing by presenting 
credits from an approved institution of college or university rank. 



56 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

V. General Suggestions. 

At least two units in the same foreign language must be presented 
when language is offered to fulfill a part of the entrance requirements. 

Students who plan to take college mathematics should secure credit 
in a secondary school for one and one-half units of algebra and for one 
unit in plane geometry. Those who want to specialize in the natural 
sciences while in college will have a need for the algebra and geometry 
also. 

Credit will not be given for less than one-half unit in any subject. 

The subjects and the number of units in each that will be accepted 
are as follows: 

English 3 to 4 units 

Foreign Languages 2 to 4 units 

History y2 to 4 units 

Other Social Sciences 1/2 to 3 units 

Algebra 1 to 2 units 

Geometry, Plane 1 unit 

Geometry, Solid 1/2 ^^^^ 

Trigonometry 1/2 unit 

General Science 1/2 to 1 unit 

Biological Science 1/2 ^^ 3 units 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Physics 1 unit 

Physical Geography 1/2 to 1 unit 

Physiology and Hygiene 1/2 to 1 unit 

Bible and Religious Education 1/2 to 1 unit 

Speech 1/2 to 1 unit 

A student should not present more than four units from the following: 

Home Economics 1 to 4 units 

Physical Education 1/2 ^^ ^ ^^^^ 

Music 1/2 to 2 units 

Art 1/2 to 1 unit 

Business Arithmetic 1/2 ^^ ^ ^^^^ 

Business English V? to 1 unit 

Commercial Geography 1/2 ^^ ^ ^^^^ 

Shorthand 1 unit 

Bookkeeping 1 unit 

Typewriting 1 unit 

Diversified Occupations 4 units 



57 

REGISTRATION 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Freshmen will begin registering at 8:00 A.M. Monday, September 
13. 

Upper-Classmen will begin registering at 8:00 A.M. Tuesday, 
September 14. Registration will be completed on Wednesday, Septem- 
ber 15, when the Registration Committee will adjourn. 

Students must complete their enrollment at the Bursar's Office by 
September 16 for the first semester, and by February 3, for the second 
semester, or pay the late registration fee of $2.00. 

FRESHMAN ORIENTATION 

In order to assist freshmen in adjusting to the college environ- 
ment, an orientation program is arranged. On registration day, Sep- 
tember 13, members of the freshman class will be given a program to 
be followed in having their schedules arranged. The plan will include 
library lectures, special lectures by members of the administration, 
health examinations and general ability and diagnostic tests. The Stu- 
dent Government Association will give instruction in student regula- 
tions and student tradition, and various campus groups will arrange 
social gatherings to give opportunity for freshmen to get acquainted. 

ADMISSION AND ROOM RESERVATION 

Those desiring to enter the College should write to the Dean of 
the College, or to the Registrar for an Application for Admission, 
which should be filled out and returned to the Bursar's Office. The 
Registrar of the College will then send the applicant a Cumulative 
Record and Transfer Blank to be filled in by her high school principal. 
The principal will return this certificate directly to the Registrar of 
Alabama College. 

With the application the sum of $2.50 should be enclosed for 
the reservation of a room. Upon registration, this amount will be cred- 
ited to the student's account. Should the applicant be unable to attend, 
the $2.50 will be refunded only if the College is notified before Au- 
gust 15. For the reservation to be held the student must report at the 
opening of the session or send by telegram or letter a satisfactory reason 
for reporting late. The remittance of $2.50 to cover room reservation 
should be made by check or money order. Cash should never be sent. 

After reserving a room an applicant who is unable to attend is not 
permitted to transfer her reservation to another. Rooms are assigned 
in order of application and usually with one or two roommates, the 
College authorities reserving the right to change rooms or roommates 
at any time. New students accepted for admission will be instructed 
by the Dean of Residence as to room supplies which they should bring. 



58 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

SEMESTER SYSTEM 

The semester system, based on the division of the academic year 
into two semesters of eighteen weeks each and a summer school of 
eleven weeks, is used. A student may enter at the beginning of any 
semester, and resident study during any two semesters or three summer 
schools is the equivalent of one academic year. 

UNIT OF CREDIT 

The unit of credit is the semester hour, each representing one hour 
of recitation with two hours of preparation a week for a period of 
eighteen weeks. As a rule, two hours of laboratory work count as one 
hour of class. 

SCHEDULE OF WORK 

The regular amount of work for a student is seventeen hours a se- 
mester including one hour of physical education. No student will be 
allowed to take more than eighteen hours of work unless she has an 
average of B for the previous semester, the consent of the College 
physician, the head of the department in which she has a major, and 
the Dean. 

CONDITION EXAMINATIONS 

Condition examinations for the first semester will be given October 
30, 1948. Applications for these examinations must be in the office of 
the Dean before October 23, 1948. Condition examinations for the sec- 
ond semester will be given March 19, 1949. Applications for these ex- 
aminations must be in the office of the Dean before March 12, 1949. 

RECORDS AND GRADES 

Final grades for each semester are recorded and preserved. Reports 
are submitted in duplicate, to students and to their parents or guard- 
ians at mid-semester and at the close of the semester. These grades 
represent the teachers' estimate of recitation, laboratory work, written 
work and final examinations. The grades are indicated as follows: 
A — Excellent; B — Good; C — Average; D — ^Passing; E — Condition; 
F — Failure; I — Incomplete. 

The passing grade regularly is D, but juniors and seniors electing 
freshman and sophomore subjects must make C. 

A course on which a grade of F is received must be repeated in 
class. In order to receive credit for a course in which a grade of E or 
I is received, the E must be removed by taking the condition examina- 
tion and the I by completing the work during the next semester the 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 59 

Student is in attendance. In case the incomplete is in physical educa- 
tion and the instructor requires class attendance, it must be removed 
during the next semester the student is in attendance and the work is 
offered. 

Students who are absent more than one-sixth of the total number 
of classes during the semester are not allowed to take final examina- 
tions, except by special permission of the Dean, but are required to re- 
peat the work. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Graduates and other former students who have met their finan- 
cial obligations to the College may secure transcripts of their records 
from the Registrar. Each will be furnished one complete transcript 
free, a charge of $1.00 being made for additional copies. 

COURSE NUMBERS 

The system of course numbers is as follows: 

When the numbers of a course are separated by a hyphen, the work 
of both semesters must be completed before credit will be granted for 
the course. When the numbers are separated by a comma, credit will 
be granted for each semester's work. 

Freshman courses extending through both semesters are numbered 
101-2, 111-2, 121-2, 131-2, and 141-2. One-semester courses are num- 
bered 151, 152; 161, 162; 171, 172; 181, 182; and 191, 192. One- 
semester courses repeated during the year are numbered 100, 110, 120, 
130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 180, and 190. 

Sophomore, junior and senior courses extending through the year 
are numbered 201 to 242, 301 to 342, and 401 to 442, respectively. 
One-semester courses are numbered 251 to 292, 351 to 392, and 451 
to 492, respectively. Those courses repeated during the year are number- 
ed in multiples of ten as follows: sophomore courses from 200 to 290, 
junior courses from 300 to 390; senior courses from 400 to 490. 

The first number represents the class and the last number the se- 
mester, with the exception that courses numbered in multiples of ten 
may be offered either the first or second semester. 

The decimal point indicates that credit in Education is given for 
courses in other departments. The number after the decimal point 
designates the accredited department as follows: 

.1 Art .6 Music 

.2 English .7 Physical Education 

3. Foreign Language .8 Science 

.4 History .9 Speech 

.5 Mathematics .10 Secretarial Science 



60 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

Credits and grade points are earned and recorded on the follow- 
ing basis: 

A — Excellent 3 grade points per hour 

B — Good 2 grade points per hour 

C — Average 1 grade point per hour 

D — Passing grade points 

E — Condition grade points 

F — Failure grade points 

I — Incomplete grade points 

Grade points for credits transferred from other institutions are 
granted on the basis of the first semester's work at Alabama College. 

HONORS 

A student who completes the work for a degree with as many as 
2.5 grade points for each hour is graduated with highest honors and 
this is cited with the degree. 

A student who completes the work for a degree with as many as 
2.0 grade points for each hour is graduated with honors and this is 
cited with the degree. 

PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

A student whose general average is below D at the end of the 
first semester may be required to withdraw or may be placed on pro- 
bation. 

If a student has taken thirty-four semester hours of work, regard- 
less of whether she has passed it, and her record is twenty-five below 
the standard number of grade points, or one grade point for each hour, 
she is subject to enforced withdrawal at the end of the second or any 
subsequent semester. 

In line with its policy to enroll students who seek diligently to 
maintain high standards of scholarship and conduct, the College re- 
serves the right to request the withdrawal of any student whose general 
work, conduct and attitude show that she is not conforming to the 
standards and ideals of the institution. In such cases formal and speci- 
fic charges are not necessary. 

ELIGIBILITY TO REPRESENT COLLEGE 

A student must have passed all of her courses during the semester 
immediately preceding and must have a satisfactory conduct record in 
order to be eligible to represent any organization of the College in pub- 
lic performances off the campus. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 61 

CLASSIFICATION 

Fifteen units of high school credit must be presented by an appli- 
cant in order to qualify for the freshman class. 

Twenty-seven semester hours of college credit and twenty-seven 
grade points are required to rank as a sophomore. 

Sixty-two semester hours of college credit and sixty-two grade 
points are required to rank as a junior. 

Ninety-four semester hours of college credit and ninety-four grade 
points are required to rank as a senior. 

ABSENCES 

Permission to be absent from the College will be granted only on 
written request from parents or guardians. Absences are not recognized 
as relieving the students of responsibility for work missed, but in 
cases of enforced absences, such as on account of personal illness, the 
privilege of making up the work missed is granted. Students who are 
absent voluntarily receive deductions in class grades by their instructors. 

CHANGES IN COURSES 

All changes in course of study must be approved by the Dean and 
are not allowed after the third week from the beginning of a semester. 
Exceptions may be made on recommendations of the College Physician 
or the head of the department in which the student is majoring. Any 
student who attends a class which is not listed on the Registrar's card 
and without the permission of the Dean will receive no credit for such 
work, and a student who drops a course without the permission of the 
Dean will receive an F on the course at the end of the semester. 



d2: 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

For requirements for specific degrees see page 63. 

1. An applicant for a degree must have credit for 128 semester 
hours of work in keeping with the requirements of the curriculum she 
is pursuing, plus eight semester hours of physical education and 136 
grade points. Two years of English are required in all curricula. 

2. On recommendation of the College Physician and with the ap- 
proval of the Dean, students may substitute credits earned in other 
courses to meet deficiencies in physical education. 

3. A candidate for the Bachelor of Arts degree must make an av- 
erage of C in her major and minor departments, and a candidate for 
the Bachelor of Science or the Bachelor of Music degree must make 
an average of C in her major department and in any other departments 
in which a formal minor is required. 

4. A student who fails to earn the requisite number of grade points 
by the time she completes the courses specified for the degree may 
take sufficient additional work to earn the required number of grade 
points, but such courses must be approved by the Dean. 

5. In the case of a student who has transferred credits from an- 
other institution, the average of her work during the first semester at 
Alabama College is taken as the average of the work transferred, and 
this average plus the average earned at Alabama College is the basis 
on which grade points are counted and honors awarded. 

6. The rsponsibility for meeting the requirements for a degree 
rests with the student. 

7. A formal application for a degree must be filed in the regis- 
trar's office before the beginning of the last semester and preferably 
one year in advance of the date on which the degree is to be conferred. 

8. The major and the minor should be chosen by the end of the 
sophomore year. 

9. Conditions must be removed at the regularly scheduled condi- 
tion examinations during the first semester the student is in attendance 
after the condition has been made, and incompletes must be removed 
by the end of that semester. 

10. The work of both semesters of a course in which a hyphen 
separates the course numbers must be completed before credit will be 
granted for that course. 

11. Each student is required to take before graduation a general 
ability test such as that administered to all entering freshmen. 

12. No degree will be conferred upon any student nor other evi- 
dence of graduation provided until all financial obligations to the col- 
lege have been paid, including the diploma fee. 



65^ 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS, 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE, AND BACHELOR 

OF MUSIC DEGREES 

I. General Requirements. 

1. Completion of 128 hours, plus eight hours of physical educa- 
tion, with 136 grade points. 

2. On transferring from another institution at least one regular 
session of nine months must be spent in residence and credit 
must be secured for at least thirty hours in advanced courses 
approved by the Dean and the head of the major department. 

3. Completion of the last six hours of the major and minor sub- 
jects at the College. 

4. Meeting the requirements for major and minor subjects as fol- 
lows: 

(a) A major in an academic subject consists of from twenty- 
four to thirty hours, and in technical subjects from twenty- 
four to forty hours. 

(b) A formal minor is composed of a minimum of eighteen 
hours. 

(c) Courses for the major and the formal minor must be se- 
lected with the advice of the professor in the major sub- 
ject and with the approval of the Dean. 

(d) In order to secure teachers' certificates on graduation, 
major and minor subjects approved by the State Depart- 
ment of Education for certification must be selected. In 
the curriculum requiring only one year of science, biology 
is recommended. 

II. Special Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree. 

1. The major and minor subjects must be chosen from the Divi- 
sions of Languages and Literature, Social Sciences, certain cur- 
ricula in the Division of Fine and Practical Arts, and in mathe- 
matics. 

2. Completion of twelve hours of English, twelve hours of mathe- 
matics and science, * twelve hours of foreign language, and not 
more than twenty hours of technical work. 



^Students who enter with two units in a foreign language may meet this 
requirement by taking only six additional hours of the language. 



64 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

III. Specl\l Requirements for Bachelor of Science Degree. 

1. The major subject must be chosen from the Division of Science 
and Mathematics or from certain curricula in the division of 
Fine and Practical Arts. 

2. Completion of ^twenty-four hours in the Division of Science 
and Mathematics, twelve hours of English, twelve hours of so- 
cial studies and ^twelve hours of foreign language. 

IV. Specl\l Requirements for Bachelor of Music Degree. 

(See School of Music, page 143) 
V. Acceleration. 

1. Students may have an opportunity to earn the Bachelor's de- 
gree in three years by attending three regular sessions and three 
summer schools. 

2. A student who wants to follow this program and be graduated 
in the spring should enter college at the opening of a summer 
school. Students entering in September and attending three 
regular sessions and three full summer schools should expect 
to be graduated at the end of a summer school. 



t Students taking secretarial science may be excused from part of this 

requirement. 
^Students taking the teacher training course in home economics may be 

excused from the foreign language requirement. 



65 

CURRICULA 

The regular faculty committee on the re-organization and improve- 
ment of instruction has been in existence at Alabama College for six- 
teen years. It studies the curricula of the College and recommends 
changes in keeping with the demands of the changing times. It gives 
considerable thought to both concentration and distribution. It also 
recommends courses and curricula needed in a special crisis. The de- 
partments of the College have been grouped into the following di- 
visions as a basis for further study: 

I. Fine and Practical Arts, including art, home economics, 

music, physical education and secretarial science. 
II. Language and Literature, including English, foreign 
language and speech. 

III. Science and Mathematics, including biology, physical 
science, and mathematics. 

IV. Social Science, including education; history, political science, 
and geography; psychology and philosophy; religious educa- 
tion; and sociology and economics. 

GENERAL PRINCIPLES UNDERLYING CHANGES 

The changes in courses and in curricula are made in the light of 
certain fundamental principles which seem to be operating in present 
day education. One principle is the belief that the first two years of 
college work should be devoted largely, but not exclusively, to general 
or liberal education and that the last two years should be devoted mainly 
to the fields of concentration. This general or liberal education should 
acquaint the student with each of four or five broad fields, should aid 
in the acquisition of certain effective mental tools, should assist in 
adaptations to contemporary problems that are faced; and the work 
in its entirety should be directed toward establishing certain groups of 
attitudes and providing certain experiences rather than toward the mere 
acquisition of facts. 

As a result of the situation arising out of the war, new courses and 
curricula were introduced for the purpose of preparing young women 
to serve the country better in that period of stress and change. Post- 
war conditions demand that many of these new courses and curricula 
be continued at least for the present and that possibly other courses 
and curricula be added. Up to the present the College has followed 
the principle that it is possible for regular students to acquire a gen- 
eral or liberal education and at the same time to get certain courses 
which will better prepare them for the present conditions and the 
immediate future. Alabama College stands ready at all times to serve 
the Government and the State, and will to the best of its ability use 
its facilities in promoting any type of specialized training for which 
there is sufficient demand. 



66 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
UBERAL ARTS 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



English 101 3 

Foreign Language 101 3 

History 101 _ 5 

Mathematics or Science 101 3 

Elective 1 

Speech 141. 1 

Physical Education 100....- 1 



17 



English 102 3 

Foreign Language 102 3 

History 102 5 

Mathematics or Science 102... 3 

Elective 1 

Speech 142 1 

Physical Education 110 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



English 201 3 

Foreign Language 201 5 

Psychology 201 3 

Science 3 

Sociology 201 3 

Elective 1 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



English 202 3 

Foreign Language 202 3 

Psychology 202 3 

Science 3 

Sociology 202 3 

Elective 1 

Physical Education 202 1 



17 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Major Subject 3 

Minor Subject 3 

Electives 10 

Physical Education 301 1 



17 



Second Semester 

Major Subject 3 

Minor Subject 3 

Electives 10 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 



SENIOR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Major Subject 3 

Philosophy 440 3 

Electives : 10 

Physical Education 401 1 



17 



Major Subject 3 

Philosophy 450 3 

Electives 10 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



Candidates for the Liberal Arts degree should elect a major field 
from the following: English, foreign language, history and political 
science, mathematics, psychology, sociology and economics, and speech. 
The head of the major department will serve as adviser to the stu- 
dent in selecting a minor field and such other related courses as will 
be needed in building a satisfactory program. Courses in applied mu- 
sic, composition or theory, may be elected, but these courses shall 
not constitute a major. 



CURRICULA 



67 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
ART 



First Semester 

Art 111 

Art 200 

English 101 

History 101 

Mathematics or Science 101.. 
Speech 141 

Physical Education 100 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester 

... 3 Art 112 3 

.. 1 Art 210 1 

.. 3 English 102 3 

.. 5 History 102 5 

..3 Mathematics or Science 102... 3 

.. 1 Speech 142 1 

._ 1 Physical Education 110 1 

17 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Art 201 2 

English 201.-... 3 

Foreign Language 101 3 

Psychology 211 2 

Science 3 

Sociology 201 3 

Physical Education 201 1 



Art 202 2 

English 202 _ 3 

Foreign Language 102 3 

Psychology 212 2 

Science ..-. .. 3 

Sociology 202 3 

Physical Education 202. 1 



17 
JUNIOR 



17 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Art 321 or 361 2 

Art Elective - 2 



Education 310. 

Education 350 

Foreign Language 201.. 
Electives 

Physical Education 301. 



Art 322 or 362 2 

Art Elective 2 

Education 320 3 

Education 350.1 3 

Foreign Language 202 3 

Electives _ 3 

Physical Education 302... 1 



17 
SENIOR 



17 



First Semester 

Art Electives 4 

Education 450 4 

Education 480 6 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 401 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Art 420 -. 1 

Art Electives 5 

Electives 10 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



This curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major 
in Art. A student not preparing to teach may substitute for the courses 
in Education. Courses will be arranged to meet the individual needs of 
students wishing a major in such other fields as commercial art, cos- 
tume design, interior design, painting and sculpture. 

For Bachelor of Fine Arts, see Page 79- 



68 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
MUSIC 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 
English 101 3 

Harmony and Ear Training 101 _ 3 
History 101 5 

Science or Mathematics 101 3 

Applied Music 111 '2 

Physical Education 100 1 



17 



Second Semester 

English 102 

Harmony and Ear Training 102 

History 102 

Science or Mathematics 102 

Applied Music 112 

Physical Education 110 



3 
3 
5 
3 
2 
. 1 

17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 
English 201 

Foreign Language 101. 



3 

3 

Psychology 211 2 

Science 3 

Sociology 201 3 

Applied Music 221 1 

Sight Singing and Ear 

Training 211 1 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



Second Semester 



English 202.. ..._.. 3 

Foreign Language 102 3 

Psychology 212 2 

Science 3 

Sociology 202 3 

Applied Music 222 1 

Sight Singing and Ear 

Training 212 1 

Physical Education 202 1 



17 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Foreign Language 201 3 

History of Music 301 3 

Education 310 3 

Education 350.6 3 

Analysis 251 2 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 301 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Foreign Language 202 3 

History of Music 302 3 

Education 320 3 

Education 350 3 

Analysis 252 2 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 



SENIOR 



First Semester 

Music _ 2 

Minor Subject 3 

Education 450 4 

Education 480 6 

Elective 1 

Physical Education 401 _ 1 



Second Semester 

Music 2 

Minor Subject _ 3 

Electives —11 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



17 



With music as a major, the student may qualify for certification in 
piano, secondary school music or choral music, provided the required 
degree of advancement has been reached. 



CURRICULA 



69 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
PSYCHOLOGY 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

English 101 3 

History 101 5 

French 101 or German 101 3 

Biology 101 3 

Speech 141 1 

Elective 1 

Physical Education 100 1 



17 



Second Semester 

English 102 3 

History 102 5 

French 102 or German 102 3 

Biology 102 3 

Speech 142 1 

Elective 1 

Physical Education 110 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 

English 201 3 

French 201 or German 201 3 

Psychology 201 3 

Mathematics 101 - 3 

Sociology 231 3 

Elective 1 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



Second Semester 

English 202 3 

French 202 or German 202 3 

Psychology 202 3 

Mathematics 102 3 

Sociology 232 3 

Elective 1 

Physical Education 202 1 



17 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Psychology 301 2 

Directed Electives 

(Psychology) 2 

Minor Subject 3 

Electives 9 

Physical Education 301 1 



17 



Second Semester 

Psychology 302 2 

Directed Electives 

(Psychology) 3 

Minor Subject 3 

Economics 350 3 

Electives 5 

Physical Education 302.. 1 



17 



First Semester 

Psychology 

Philosophy 440 

Electives 

Physical Education 401. 



SENIOR 



.. 5 
.- 3 



Second Semester 

Psychologv - 4 

Philosophy 450 - 3 

Electives 9 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



17 



70 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
RETAIL ECONOMICS 



First Semester 

English 101 

History 101 

Foreign Language 101... 
Home Economics 101... 
Speech 141 

Physical Education 100.. 



FRESHMAN 



English 
History 



Second Semester 

102 

102 



Foreign Language 102 3 



Home Economics 
Speech 142 

Physical Education 



102. 



110. 



4 
. 1 
. 1 

17 



First Semester 

*Art 111 

Biology 101 or 201 

English 201 

Foreign Language 201. 



SOPHOMORE 



2 

3 

3 

3 

Psychology 211 2 

Sociology 201 3 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



Second Semester 
*Art 112 2 

Biology 102 or 202 3 



English 202. 

Foreign Language 202 

Psychology 212 

Sociology 202 

Physical Education 202. 



3 
, 3 
. 2 
. 3 
. 1 

17 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Economics 301 3 

Physical Science or 

Mathematics 101 3 

tHome Economics 300 2 

Home Economics 250 or 320 4 

Home Economics 360 1 

Home Economics 450 2 

Elective ..- 1 

Physical Education 301 1 



17 



SENIOR 
First Semester 

Home Economics 431 2 

Home Economics 451 5 

Home Economics 460 2 

Home Economics 461 5 

Art 311 3 



Second Semester 

Economics 302 3 

Physical Science or 

Mathematics 102 3 

Psychology 340 2 

Home Economics 362 3 

Electives 5 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 



17 



Second Semester 

Home Economics 462 2 

Electives 14 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



The student should minor in English and speech, the social sciences, 
foreign languages, or art. The restrictions on technical courses must 
be observed in selecting electives. 



*If the student minors in art, Art 111-112 must be taken for 3 hours each. 
^Students may substitute Home Economics 270 for 300. 



CURRICULA 



71 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK 



First Semester 

English 101 

History 101 

Foreign Language 101 

Mathematics or Science 101. 

Speech 141 

Sociology 101 

Physical Education 100. 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester 

.. 3 English 102 

.. 5 History 102 

.. 3 Foreign Language 102 

..3 Mathematics or Science 102. _, 

._ 1 SiDeech 142 

.. 1 Sociology 102. 

.. 1 Physical Education 110.. 

17 



First Semester 

Sociology 231 

English 201 

Foreign Language 201 

Psychology 201 

Science 

Elective 



SOPHOMORE 



3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

1 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



Second Semester 

Sociology 232 

English 202 

Foreign Language 202 

Psychology 202 

Science 

Elective 

Physical Education 202. _ 



3 
. 3 
. 3 
. 3 
. 3 
. 1 
. 1 

17 



First Semester 

Social Work 351 _. 

Social Work 361 

Economics 301 

*Home Economics 300_-. 
Electives 



JUNIOR 



Physical Education 301 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Social Work 352 3 

Social Work 362 2 

Economics 302 _ 3 

*Home Economics 430 2 

Electives 6 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 



SENIOR 



First Semester 

Social Work 421 3 

Social Work 461 2 

Social Work 470 2 

Political Science 351 3 

Electives 6 

Physical Education 401 1 

17 



Second Semester 

Social Work 422 3 

Social Work 462 2 

Social Work 470 2 

Directed Electives 3 

Electives 6 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



To be certified for School Attendance work students must complete 
a minimum of ten hours in education, which should include Education 

472. 



^Required of those who wish to be certified in Attendance work. 



72 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

SPEECH AND DRAMATICS 



First Semester FRESHMAN 



Second Semester 



English 101 

History 101 

Mathematics or Science 101 

Speech 110 - 

Speech 121 or 131 

Elective 

Physical Education 100 



, 3 English 102 3 

, 5 History 102 5 

, 3 Mathematics or Science 102... 3 

. 3 Speech 120 3 

. 1 Speech 122 or 132 1 

, 1 Elective 1 

1 Physical Education 110. 1 

17 17 



First Semester SOPHOMORE 



Second Semester 



English 201 3 

Sociology 201 3 

Foreign Language 101 3 

Psychology 201 3 

Speech 230 2 

Speech 221 or 231 1 

Directed Elective 1 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



English 202 3 

Sociology 202 3 

Foreign Language 102 3 

Psychology 202 3 

Speech 212 3 

Speech 222 or 232 1 

Physical Education 202 1 



17 



First Semester JUNIOR 

Speech 371 2 

Speech 351 2 

Foreign Language 201 3 

Science 3 

Education 310 3 

Education 350 3 

Physical Education 301 1 



Second Semester 



Speech 372 2 

Speech o80 2 

Foreign Language 202 3 

Science 3 

Education 320 3 

Education 350.9 3 

Physical Education 302 1 



First Semester 



17 
SENIOR 



17 



Second Semester 



Speech 421 or 431 1 

Speech 470.. 2 

Education 450 4 

Education 480 6 

Electives 3 

Physical Education 401 1 



Speech 422, or 432 1 

Directed Speech 3 

Electives 12 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 17 

Speech majors are required to take a minimiim of two years in in- 
dividual instruction. 

The minor in this curriculum must be taken in some field other than 
English. In Physical Education, dancing should be taken in the Sopho- 
more and Junior years. This curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree, and to the Secondary Professional Class B certificate. 

If interested in Recreation as a minor, see curriculum set up for 
this field. 



CURRICULA 



73 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
BIOLOGY 



First Semester 



FRESHMAN 



Second Semester 



Biology 111 3 

English 101 3 

History 111 3 

Foreign Language 101 3 

Physical Science 121 4 

Physical Education 100 1 



Biology 112 3 

English 102 3 

History 112 3 

Foreign Language 102 3 

Physical Science 122 4 

Physical Education 110 1 



17 



17 



First Semester 



SOPHOMORE 



Second Semester 



Biology 221 3 

English 201 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 

Physical Science 201 or 

Elective 4 

Sociology 201 3 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



Biology 222 3 

English 202 3 

Foreign Language 202 3 

Physical Science 202 or 

Elective 4 

Sociology 202 3 

Physical Education 202 1 



17 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Biology 311 4 

Physical Science 301 or 321. 

Education 310 

Psychology 211 

Electives 

Physical Education 301 



Second Semester 



16 



Biology 312 or 350 and 

Elective _ 4 

Physical Science 302 or 322 3 

Education 320 3 

Psychology 212 _ 2 

Biology 212 5 

Physical Education 302 1 



18 



First Semester 



SENIOR 



Second Semester 



Biology 430 2 

Economics 301 or Elective 3 

Education 350 3 

Education 350.8 3 

Electives 5 

Physical Education 401 1 



17 



Biology 440 3 

Economics 302 or Elective 3 

Education 450 4 

Education 480 6 

Phvsical Education 402 1 



17 



This curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Science degree and to the 
Secondary Professional Class B certificate. Students not wishing to 
qualify for teachers' certificates may substitute other electives for 
education. A minor of eighteen hours may be taken in physical science, 
English, history, mathematics or foreign languages. 



74 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
BIOLOGY 

FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICAL TECHNICIANS 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

Biology 111 3 

English 101 3 

History 111 or 

Mathematics 101 3 

Foreign Language 101 3 

Physical Science 121 4 

Physical Education 100 1 



'17 



Second Semester 

Biology 112 

English 102 

History 112 or 
Mathematics 102 



Foreign Language 102 3 

Physical Science 122 4 

Physical Education 110 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



Biology 221 3 

EngHsh 201 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 

Physical Science 201 or 

Elective 4 

Sociology 201 3 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Biology 222 3 

English 202 3 

Foreign Language 202 _ 3 

Physical Science 202 or 

Elective 4 

Sociology 202 3 

Physical Education 202 1 



17 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Biology 311 4 

Physical Science 321 3 

Physical Science 301 3 

Psychology 211 2 

Electives 3 

Physical Education 301 1 



16 



Second Semester 

Biology 312 4 

Physical Science 322 3 

Physical Science 302 3 

Psychology 212 _ 2 

Biology 212 5 

Physical Education 302 1 



18 



SENIOR 
First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 410 4 Electives 17 

Biology 420 3 ^ or* 

Biology 450 3 May substitute twelve months 

Physical Education 401 1 laboratory work in an accredit- 

Electives 6 ed hospital under a clinical 

pathologist for above electives. 

17 17 



♦See Page 94. 



CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
CHEMISTRY 



75 



English 
History 



First Semester 



101. 
111. 



FRESHMAN 



Foreign Language 101 3 

Mathematics 101 3 



Physical Science 121 4 

Physical Education 100 1 



17 



Second Semester 



English 102 3 

History 112 3 

Foreign Language 102.... _ 3 

Mathematics 102 3 

Physical Science 122 4 

Physical Education 110 1 



17 



First Semester 

English 201 

Foreign Language 201.. 
Sociology 201. 



SOPHOMORE 



3 

3 

3 

Physical Science 201 4 

Physical Science 210. 



Physical Education 201 1 



17 



Second Semester 



English 202 3 

Foreign Language 202... 3 

Sociology 202 3 

Physical Science 202 4 

Physical Education 202 1 

Electives 3 



17 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Physical Science 301. 3 

Physical Science 321 3 

Psychology 211 2 

Education 310 _ 3 

Physical Education 301 1 

Electives 5 



17 



Second Semester 



Physical Science 302 3 

Physical Science 322 3 

Psychology 212 ,. ...- 2 

Education 320 3 

Physical Education 302 1 

Electives 5 



17 



First Semester 



SENIOR 



Physical Science 410 _ 3 

Education 350 3 

Education 350.8 3 

Physical Education 401 1 

Electives 7 



17 



Second Semester 



Physical Science - 3 

Education 450 4 

Education 480 6 

Physical Education 402 1 

Electives - - 3 



17 



A minor of eighteen hours in an unrelated field is required in this 
curriculum. This curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Science degree 
and to the Secondary Professional Class B certificate. Students not 
wishing to qualify for a teacher's certificate may substitute other elec- 
tives for education. 



76 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
MATHEMATICS 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



English 101.... 3 

History 101 5 

Mathematics 101 3 

Physical Science 121 4 

Speech 141 1 

Physical Education 100 1 



17 



Second Semester 



English 102 3 

History 102 5 

Mathematics 102 3 

Physical Science 122 4 

Speech 142 1 

Physical Education 110 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



English 201 3 

Biology 201 3 

Foreign Language 101 3 

Mathematics 201 3 

Psychology 211 2 

Sociology 201 3 

Physical Education 201.. 1 



18 



Second Semester 



English 202 3 

Biology 202 3 

Foreign Language 102 3 

Mathematics 202_ 3 

Psychology 212 2 

Sociology 202 3 

Physical Education 202 1 



18 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Mathematics 301 3 

Physical Science 301 3 

Education 310... _ 3 

Education 350.5 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 

Physical Education 301 1 



16 



Second Semester 



Mathematics 302 3 

Physical Science 302 3 

Education 320. 3 

Education 350.8 3 

Foreign Language 202 3 

Physical Education 302 1 



16 



First Semester 



SENIOR 



Mathematics 451 3 

Education 450 .. 4 

Education 480 6 

Physical Education 401 1 

Electives 3 



17 



Second Semester 



Mathematics 452 _ 3 

Electives 13 

Physical Education 402 1 



This curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Science degree and to the 
Secondary Professional Class B certificate. Students not wishing to 
qualify for a certificate may substitute other electives for Education. 



CURRICULA 



77 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



First Semester FRESHMAN 



Second Semester 



Biology 221 3 

English 101 3 

History 101 5 

Speech 141..... 1 

Physical Education 191 ..._ 3 

Physical Education 140 2 



17 



Biology 222 3 

English 102 „.„ 3 

History 102... 5 

vSpeech 142 1 

Physical Education 192 3 

Elective 2 



17 



First Semester SOPHOMORE 



Second Semester 



Biology 211 _ 5 

EngHsii 201 3 

Psychology 211 2 

^Physical Science 111 or 

Foreign Language 101 3 

*Sociology 201 3 



Biology 212 5 

English 202 3 

Psychology 212 2 

^Physical Science 112 or 

Foreign Language 102 3 

"^Sociology 202. 



Physical Education 291 2 Physical Education 292 2 



18 

First Semester JUNIOR 

Physical Education 361 .._ 2 

Physical Education 381 3 

Physical Education 391 2 

Foreign Language 201 or 

Elective 3 

Education 310 _ 3 

Education 350.7 3 

16 
First Semester SENIOR 

Biology 300 3 

Physical Education 461 1 

Physical Education 471 3 

Education 450 _ 3 

Education 480 6 

Phvsical Education 491 1 



18 



Second Semester 



Physical Education 362 2 

Physical Education 352.. _.. 3 

Physical Education 392 2 

Foreign Language 202 or 

Elective .- 3 

Education 320 3 

Education 350.8... 3 

16 
Second Semester 

Psychology 350 3 

Physical Education 462 1 

Physical Education 482 . 2 

Physical Education 492 1 

Physical Education 350 ...2 

Physical Education 300 _ 2 

Physical Education 360 - 2 

Electives 4 



17 



17 



This curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Science degree and to the 
Secondary Professional Class B certificate. Students not wishing to 
qualify for a certificate may substitute other electives for Education. 
Students wishing to be certified to teach Science must include a mini- 
mum of three semester hours each in Chemistry, Physics and Biology. 



*Six hours in sociology and a minimum of twenty-four hours in science 
are required. 



78 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 



First Semester FRESHMAN 



Second Semester 



English 101 

History 101 

Modern Language 101. 

^Science 101 

Speech 141 



3 

5 

3 

3 

1 

Elective 1 

Physical Education 100 1 



English 102 3 

History 102 5 

Modern Language 102 3 

Science 102 3 

Speech 142 1 

Elective 1 

Physical Education 110 1 



17 
First Semester SOPHOMORE 

English 201 3 

Modern Language 201 3 

Secretarial Science 201 3 

Secretarial Science 211 _ 2 

Sociology 201 3 

Psychology 211 2 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 

Second Semester 

English 202 3 

Modern Language 202 3 

Secretarial Science 202 _ 3 

Secretarial Science 212 2 

Sociology 202 3 

Psychology 212 2 

Physical Education 202 1 



First Semester 
Secretarial Science 301.. 



17 
JUNIOR 



17 



Second Semester 



Secretarial Science 311 2 

Secretarial Science 321 3 

**Economics 350 3 

Education 310 _ 3 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 301 1 



Secretarial Science 302. 3 

Secretarial Science 330 2 

Secretarial Science 322... 3 

Education 350.10 3 

Education 320 3 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 302 1 



First Semester 
Secretarial Science 470.. 
Secretarial Science 400.. 

Education 450 

Education 480 

Physical Education 401. 



17 

SENIOR 

... 3 
... 3 
... 4 
... 6 
... 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Secretarial Science 480 3 

Secretarial Science 450 _ 3 

Geography 460 _ 3 

Education 350 3 

Electives 4 

Physical Education 402 1 

17 17 

This curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Science degree and to the 
Secondary Professional Class B certificate. Students not wishing to 
qualify for this certificate may substitute electives for Education. For 
those expecting to enter government work, a minor in Public Adminis- 
tration is recommended. 

For those desiring to work in a physician's office or the office of 
a hospital, the curriculum for medical stenographer is recommended. 



* Students taking Medical Stenography should take Physical Science 
111-112 instead of Science 101-102. 

**Students minoring in Public Administration should take Economics 
301-302 instead of Economics 350. Any student may make this sub- 
stitution. 



CURRICULA 79 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS DEGREE 
ART 

Alabama College is announcing a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. 

Requirements for admission to this curriculum 

To be eligible to become a candidate for this degree the student 
must hold a Bachelor of Arts degree from a fully accredited institu- 
tion and must have credit for as much as thirty semester hours in art. 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree 

The student must complete from thirty to thirty-six hours in art. 
Thirty hours must be earned at Alabama College and twenty-four 
hours of this must be taken in residence. Eighteen hours must be se- 
lected from one of the following fields of art: Art Education, Cera- 
mics and Crafts, Commercial Art, Design (Costume, Industrial, In- 
terior), Drawing and Painting, Sculpture. Electives in any of the art 
fields may be selected to complete the requirements for the degree. 
The total program, however, must include as much as eighteen hours 
from courses numbered 411 to 490. 

COURSES FOR THE BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS DEGREE 

Art 411, 412. Design, Advanced {Costume, Interior, Industrial). 

Prerequisite: Art 511, 512 or the equivalent. Credit, 5 to 3 hours 
each semester. 

Art 450, 460. Crafts, Advanced. 

Prerequisite: Art 261, 262 or the equivalent. Credit, 5 to 5 hours 
each semester. 

Art 460.1. Art Education. 

Prerequisite: Art 530.1 or the equivalent. Credit, 5 to 5 hours each 
semester. 

Art 451, 452, Ceramics. 

Prerequisite: Art 111, 112, Art 241, 242 or the equivalent. Credit, 
5 to 5 hours each semester. 

Art 460, 470. Life, Advanced, 

Prerequisite: Art 200, Art 550, 540 or the equivalent. Credit, 5 to 
5 hours each semester. 

Art 461, 462. Painting, Advanced. 

Prerequisite: Art 501, 502 or the equivalent. Credit, 5 to 5 hours 
each semester. 



80 alabama college 

Art 471, 472. Portrait, Advanced. 

Prerequisite: Art 401, 402 or the equivalent. Credit, 3 to 3 hours 
each semester. 

Art 481, 482. Sculpture, Advanced. 

Prerequisite: Art 341, 342 or the equivalent. Credit, 3 to 3 hours 
each semester. 

Art 480, 490. Seminar. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS DEGREE 
MUSIC 

Requirements for admission to this curriculum 

To be eligible to become a candidate for this degree the student 
must hold a Bachelor of Music or a Bachelor of Arts degree from a 
fully accredited institution, and must have credit for as much as thirty 
semester hours in music. 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree 

The student must complete from thirty to thirty-six hours in mu- 
sic. Thirty hours must be earned at Alabama College and twenty-four 
hours of this must be taken in residence. Six hours of this must be 
taken in a single field of applied music and six hours in one of the 
following fields: Composition, Teacher Training, Musicology. Elec- 
tives to complete the total hours must be taken from the field of music. 

COURSES FOR THE BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS DEGREE 

Music 451-452. Applied Music. Credit, 6 to 12 hours. 

Music 411, 412. Composition. 

Prerequisite: Composition 301-302. Credit, 3 to 6 hours each 
semester. 

Music 451. Advanced Counterpoint. Credit, 2 hours. 

Music 452. Advanced Harmony. Credit, 2 hours. 

Music 431, 432. Advanced Teacher Training. 

Not more than two fields may be entered in either semester. Pre- 
requisite: Four hours in Directed Teaching. Credit, 2 or 4 hours each 
semester. 

Music 491-492. Musicology. Credit, 6 to 12 hours. 

Six hours may be in an academic field with the approval of the 
Director. Certain advanced work from the regular music courses may 
be used in addition to hours selected from the above list. 



CURRICULA 81 

MINOR IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

College graduates who hope to enter government work should 
have some special ability or technique, such as typing, shorthand, cleri- 
cal, interviewing, accounting, or social work. To give students a back- 
ground for Merit System Examinations and to enable them to get a 
better grasp of the functions and inter-relations of the various govern- 
mental departments, the College offers a minor in Public Administra- 
tion. 

This minor will be open to students who are majoring in Liberal 
Arts, Secretarial Science, and other fields with the approval of the 
major professor. For a minor in Public Administration, Political Sci- 
ence 301 or 351, Political Science 310, and Sociology 410 are required. 
Nine additional hours should be elected from the other courses listed 
below. It is suggested that these electives be chosen in conference with 
the major professor or the chairman of the Committee on Public Ad- 
ministration and that they be selected from different groupings listed 
below rather than in one field only. No course counted for a major 
can be credited toward a minor. The description of each course will 
be found under the departmental announcements of the department 
in which it is offered. 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

Economics 301-302. The Development of Modern Economic 

Principles and Problems. Credit, 6 hours. Mr. Flynn 

Economics 350. General Principles of Economics. 

Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Flynn 

Economics 360. Economics of Social Planning. 

Credit, 3 hours. Afe. Flynn 

Economics 370. Labor Problems. 

Credit, 5 hours. Mr. Flynn 

Sociology 410. Personnel Administration. 

Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Douglas 

Sociology 411. Social Trends. 

Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Flynn 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 251, 252. Elementary Statistics. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. Miss Braswell 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 301. Introduction to Political Science, 

Credit, 3 hours. Miss Farmer 

Political Science 310. Principles of Public Administration. 

Credit, 3 hours. Miss Farmer 



82 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



Political Science 351. State and Local Government. 

Credit, 3 hours. Miss Farmer 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 
Secretarial Science 320. Elementary Principles of 
Accounting. 

Credit, 5 hours. MiSS McGee 

Secretarial Science 331, 332. Occupational Analysis. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. Miss McGee 

Secretarial Science 400. Business Organization. 

Miss McGee 
Money and Banking. 



Credit, 3 hours. 
Secretarial Science 430. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
Secretarial Science 450. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 
Secretarial Science 470. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
Secretarial Science 480. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



Office Procedure. 



Business Writing. 



Business Law. 



SPEECH 



Miss McGee 



Miss Elgin 



Miss McGee 



Miss Elgin 



Speech 210. Advanced Principles of Speech. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. Miss Compton 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE MAJORS 

For Secretarial Science majors who desire a minor in Public Ad- 
ministration, the following distribution of courses is recommended 
for the junior and senior years: 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Second Semester 



Secretarial Science 301 3 

Secretarial Science 311 2 

Secretarial Science 321 3 

Economics 301. _ 3 

Political Science 301 or 351 3 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 301 1 



Secretarial Science 302 3 

Secretarial Science 330 2 

Secretarial Science 322 3 

Economics 302 3 

Political /Science 310 /. 3 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 
SENIOR 



17 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Secretarial Science 400 3 

Secretarial Science 470 3 

Sociology 410 3 

Public Administration 

Electives 3 

Electives „ 4 

Physical Education 401 1 



Geography 460 3 

Secretarial Science 480. _ 3 

Secretarial Science 450 - 3 

Public Administration 

Electives 6 

Elective 1 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



17 



CURRICULA 83 

CURRICULUM FOR MEDICAL STENOGRAPHERS 

For Secretarial Science majors who desire to be prepared as medi- 
cal stenographers, the following substitutions are recommended in the 
curriculum outlined on page 78. If these substitutions are made, the 
student will not be eligible for a teacher's certificate. 

Freshman Year 
Take Physical Science 111-112 instead of Science 101-102. 

Sophomore Year 
Take Biology 221-222 instead of Sociology 201-202. 

Junior Year 
Take Sociology 201-202, and Biology 212 the second semester. 
Omit courses in education. 

Senior Year 
Take Biology 311-312. Omit courses in education. 

MINOR IN RECREATION 

A minor in Recreation is provided for those students who desire 
to enter the field of recreation upon graduation and who do not wish 
to teach. A student who makes a minor in Recreation does not meet 
the State requirements for a teacher's certificate. 

Each student will register with the Head of the Department of 
Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 

A minimum of eighteen to twenty-four hours, depending on the 
background of the individual, is required for this minor. At least 
twelve hours are to be selected from one of the following departments, 
exclusive of her major department: Art, Music, Physical Education, or 
Speech. Each student's requirements will be subject to the approval of 
the head of her major department and the heads of the departments 
in which she is taking work leading to the recreation minor. The re- 
mainder of the requirements will be met by selecting hours from the 
courses listed below. 

The description of each course will be found in the departmental 
announcements of the department under which it is offered. 

ART 
Art 110. Crafts. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. Miss Davis 

Art 111, 112. Foundations of Art. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. Miss Kennedy 

Art 200. Freehand Drawing. 

Credit, 1 hour. Miss Kennedy 



84 alabama college 

Art 201, 202. Painting. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. Miss Kennedy 

Art 241, 242. Pottery. 

Credit, 2 or 5 hours each semester. Miss Allen 

Art 341, 342. Sculpture. 

Credit, 2 or 5 hours each semester. Miss Allen 

Art 351, 352. Art as Recreation. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. Miss Davis, Miss Kennedy 

MUSIC 

Music 341-342. Recreational Music. 

Credit, 6 hours. Mr. LeBaron 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education ill, 112; 211, 212; 311, 312; 411, 412. Rec- 
reational Activities. 
These activities include basketball, folk dance, games, recreational 

activities, and square dance. Two hours a week. Credit, 1 hour each 
semester. 
Staff, Department of Health and Physical Education 

Physical Education 140. Techniques in Camping Education. 
Credit, 2 hours. Miss Lundquist 

Physical Education 300. First Am. 

Credit, 1 hour. Staff 

Physical Education 340. Camp Organization and Adminis- 
tration. 
Credit, 2 hours. Miss McCall 

Physical Education 350. Techniques in Social Recreation. 
Credit, 2 hours. Miss Finger 

Physical Education 360. Philosophy of Recreation. 
Required of all minors in Recreation. Credit, 2 hours. 

Staffs, Departments of Art, Music, Physical 

Education, Speech 

Physical Education 361, 362. Coaching Team and Individual 
Sports. * 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. Miss McCall 

Physical Education 430, 440. Community Recreation. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. Miss McCall 



Above — Calkins Hall, completed in 1917. 
Below — King House, erected in 1823. 




i 



rrriTifpill 



m^m^mi 



«s 



^^m 



•ISI;^^'^^ 



f'^VilsI . ti-'i 



'Af>- 



M/mk 




CURRICULA 85 

SPEECH 

Speech 200. Theatre Make-up. 

Credit, 1 hour. Miss Gould 

Speech 212. Acting. 

Credit, 3 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 551. Story Telling. 

Credit, 2 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 380. Stagecraft. 

Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Trumbauer 

Speech 450. Play Production. 

Credit, 3 hours. Miss GoULD 

Speech 470. Play Directing. 

Credit, 2 hours. Miss Gould, Mr. Trumbauer 

Note: Students must confer with the Head of the Department of 
Physical Education relative to the eight hours of physical education 
prescribed for all students. The required eight hours of physical edu- 
cation will not count on the requirements for this minor. 

MINOR IN LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

A minor in Latin American Civilization is offered students who 
are interested in either cultural or practical information concerning our 
Latin American neighbors. This minor is designed to give students a 
knowledge and an understanding of the Latin American peoples and 
their civilization 

Spanish 101-102 and Spanish 201-202 are prerequisites for this 
minor. Students electing it will be required to take History 352, A 
Survey of South American History, 3 hours; or History 362, A History 
of the Caribbean Nations, 3 hours; and Geography 350, South Ameri- 
ca, 3 hours. A minimum of twelve additional hours may be elected 
from the following courses, after conference with the major professor. 

ART 
Art 380. Latin American Art. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Allen 

MUSIC 

Music 351, 352. Music Apprecl\tion. Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

Mr. LeBaron 

Above — Edward Houston Wills Memorial Library, 

erected in 1922, and Bloch Hall, erected in 1915. 
Below — TuTWiLER Hall, Senior Dormitory, erected in 1940. 



86 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



SPANISH 

Spanish 300. Current Spanish. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Stockton 
Spanish 320. Advanced Composition and Conversation. 



Credit, 5 hours. 



Miss Stockton 



Spanish 360. Literature of the Caribbean Countries. 



Credit, 3 hours. 

Spanish 370. South American Literature. 
Credit, 3 hours. 

ECONOMICS 

Economics 410. International Economics. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



Secretarial Science 450. 
Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Office Procedure. 



HISTORY 



History 452. Inter- American Diplomacy. 
Credit, 2 hours. 

Geography 460. Economic Geography. 
Credit, 3 hours. 



Miss Stockton 



Miss Stockton 



Mr. Flynn 



Miss Elgin 



Miss Eastman 



Miss Marshall 



Students in Liberal Arts are advised to select courses from the 
fields of literature and the arts which will increase their knowledge of 
Latin American culture. Students majoring in Secretarial Science are 
advised to select courses which will strengthen their preparation for 
work with private corporations and government agencies concerned 
with Latin American relations. 



87 

PART THREE 



DEPARTMENTAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ART 

Professor Kennedy; Associate Professor Allen; 
Assistant Professor Barnes; Instructor Davis. 

Art 100. Crafts. 

Design and execution in creative crafts. For non-majors. Credit, 
1 hour. Miss Davis 

Art 110. Crafts. 

Units of related design and processes with creative experience in 

the major crafts. Book-binding, leathercraft, metalcraft, plastics, weav- 
ing, and wood v/orking. Credit, 2 or 3 hours. Miss Davis 

Art 111, 112. Foundations of Art. 

A study of the elements and principles underlying all forms of 
art, including architecture, painting, sculpture, crafts and industries. 
Creative work and appreciative study to develop understanding and 
skill. Credit, 2 or 5 hours each semester. 

Miss Allen, Mrs, Barnes, Miss Kennedy 

Art 200. Freehand Drawing. 

A study of the rules of perspective and representation in pencil, 
pen and ink. Credit, 1 hour. Miss Kennedy 

Art 201, 202. Painting, 

A beginning course in painting, including a study of the organiza- 
tion of forms, the representation of forms, and the expression of ideas 
through the medium of paint. Credit, 2 hours each se?nester. 

Miss Kennedy 
Art 210. Mechanical Drawing. 

A foundation course in how to read and write the language of the 
industries. Practice in the making of working drawings. Credit, 1 hour. 

Miss Kennedy 
Art 221, 222. Color. 

A course designed for the development of appreciation and under- 
standing of the use of color in everyday living. Credit, 1 hour each 
semester. Miss Allen 

Art 230. Stage Design. 

A study of the structural elements of art in designing for the 
theatre. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Allen 



88 alabama college 

Art 231, 232. Interior Design. 

A study of functional design and selection applied to the home. 
Original problems, class discussions and lectures. Credit, 2 hours each 
semester. Miss Allen 

Art 241, 242. Pottery. 

Designing and building pottery. Work with clay, glazes and fir- 
ing. Credit, 2 or 3 hours each semester. Miss Allen 

Art 251, 252. Costume Design. 

A study of the art of planning, selecting and wearing clothes. Em- 
phasis may be on fashion, design and illustration for commercial pur- 
poses, or creative selection for the consumer. Discussions and original 
problems. Credit, 2 hours each semester. Miss Allen 

Art 260, 270. Lettering. 

A study of the structure of the alphabet, the design of words and 
pages. Practice in hand lettering and layouts for advertising. Credit, 

2 hours each semester. Mrs. Barnes 

Art 261, 262. Crafts. 

A course to develop the individual inventiveness of the student. 
Work is planned on the basis of student interest. Prerequisites: Art 110 
for 3 hours and Art 111. Credit, 2 or 3 hours each semester. 

Miss Davis 

Art 301, 302. Painting. 

A course to develop the individual inventiveness of the student. 
Work is planned on the basis of subject matter and medium of interest 
to the student. Prerequisite: Art 201, 202. Credit, 2 or 3 hours each 
semester. Miss Kennedy 

Art 310. Art Apprecl^tion. 

A course for the non-art student. Demonstrations, discussion, and 
lectures to provide a basis for understanding art. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Kennedy 

Art 311, 312. Design. 

A course dealing with creative design for industry and commerce. 
Original problems based on the principles of art structure. Prerequi- 
site: Art 112. Credit, 2 or 3 hours each semester. 

Miss Kennedy 
Art 320. Composition. 

A study of the principles of art structure in pictorial composition. 
Original problems, supplementary reading, and discussion. Credit, 2 or 

3 hours. Miss Kennedy 



ART ^9 

Art 321. History and Appreciation of Ancient Art. 

A survey of the plastic and graphic arts from prehistoric times 
through the Roman Empire. Lectures, class discussion and outside 
reading. Offered alternate years. Credit, 2 hours. Mrs. Barnes 

Art 322. History^ and Appreciation of Medieval Art. 

A survey of the plastic and graphic arts from early Christian times 
through Gothic period. Lectures, class discussions and outside reading. 
Offered alternate years. Credit, 2 hours. Mrs. Barnes 

Art 330, 340. Life. 

Sketching from the costumed model in charcoal, pencil and paint. 
A study of the figure in pictorial composition. Credit, 2 hours each 
semester. Mrs. Barnes 

Art 340.1. The Teaching of Art in the Elementary Grades, 
(See Education 340.1.) Credit, 2 hours. Ivliss Allen 

Art 341, 342. Sculpture. 

Study of form and three-dimensional design through working di- 
rectly with the various materials used in modern sculpture. Original 
designs made and executed in permanent materials. Credit, 2 or 5 hours 
each semester. Miss Allen 

Art 350.1. The Teaching of Art in High School. 

(See Education 350.1.) Credit, 5 hours. Miss Allen 

Art 351, 352. Art As Recreation. 

A course for students interested in recreation leadership. Study of 
art processes, skills, and materials which function in a recreation pro- 
gram. In the second semester emphasis is placed on the crafts and must 
be preceded by the the first semester. Credit, 5 hours each semester. 

Miss Davis, Miss Kennedy 
Art 360. Art in the Home. 

A study of art as it functions in the home. Demonstrations and 
discussions on design in modern architecture, costume and related 
fields. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Allen 

Art 361. History and Appreciation of Renaissance Art. 

A survey of the plastic and graphic arts of the Renaissance. Lec- 
tures, class discussions and outside reading. Offered alternate years. 
{Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 2 hours. Mrs. Barnes 

Art 362. History and Apprecl\tion of Modern Art. 

A survey of the plastic and graphic arts from the eighteenth cen- 
tury through contemporary work. Lectures, class discussions and out- 
side reading. Offered alternate years. {Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 
2 hours. Mrs. Barnes 



90 alabama college 

Art 371, 372. Commercl\l Art. 

A course in composition and drawing, with study of the techniques 
in fields of commercial art such as advertising and fashion illustration. 
Credit, 3 hours each semester. Miss Kennedy 

Art 380. Latin American Art. 

A survey of the plastic and graphic arts in the Latin American 
Countries. Lectures, class discussions, and outside reading. Credit, 2 
hours. Miss Allen 

Art 400. The Art Workshop. 

Students may do intensive work for short periods in any of the 
fields of art included in the regular courses. No previous training is 
required, but a student must have had business or teaching experience, 
or some acquaintance with art. Credit from 1 to 10 hours may be given 
toward a degree, depending upon the quality and quantity of the work. 
Miss Allen, Mrs. Barnes, Miss Davis, Miss Kennedy 

Art 401, 402. Portrait Painting. 

A study of line, volume, and color in the human form, as it ex- 
presses the likeness and personality of the sitter. Prerequisites: Art 
201-202, Art 330-340. Credit, 2 or 3 hours each semester. 

Mrs. Barnes 

Art 410. The Art Workshop (for Art Majors). 

For senior majors and minors in art. Students must at some time 
during the year have an exhibition or demonstration open to the pub- 
lic. The work is on an individual basis, being selected from the fields 
of architecture, crafts, design, painting and sculpture. Credit, 2 to 10 
hours. Miss Allen, Mrs. Barnes, Miss Davis, Miss Kennedy 

Art 420. Senior Seminar for Art Majors. 

A study of the problems in art as they develop for the advanced 
student. Required of art majors in the senior year. Credit, 1 hour. 

Miss Kennedy 

For courses leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree see page 79. 



91 
BIOLOGY 

Professor Sharp; Associate Professor Blackiston; 

Instructor Bailey. . 

Biology 101-102. Survey in Biological Science, 

The aim of this course is to teach biological principles and con- 
cepts rather than give merely factual information. Plant and animal 
forms are treated in a comparative manner, with emphasis on function 
rather than structure. Motion pictures are shown for an hour each week 
to supplement class work and to serve as visual aid in the study of 
plant and animal life and the human body. The last half of the year 
is devoted to a study of the human body. Two lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory-demonstration period a week. Credit, 6 hours. 

Mr. Bailey 
Biology 111-112. General Botany. 

Designed to teach the fundamental principles of botany. Proto- 
plasm, the cell, the structure and functions of the various parts of a 
typical plant are first considered, followed by a study of representative 
types of thallophytes, bryophytes, pteridophytes, and spermatophytes. 
One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Credit, 6 
hours. Mr. Sharp 

Biology 201-202. General Biology. 

This course deals very briefly during the first semester with a few 
representative forms of the four phyla of the plant kingdom; the cells, 
cell divisions, and functions of cells; the kind, structure, and use of the 
root, stem, leaves, buds, fruits, and seeds; and a few animal forms rep- 
resentative of the invertebrate phyla, namely: Amoeba, Paramecium, 
Euglena, Hydra, Obelia, Gonionemus, Planaria, Ascaris, Earthworm, 
and an Arthropod. During the second semester, the frog and man are 
studied as representative of the vertebrates with special emphasis on the 
human body. Toward the end of the course some consideration is given 
genetics, evolution, practical aspects of biology, and the makers of 
biology. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Credit, 6 hours. Miss Blackiston 

Biology 211. Anatomy. 

Lectures on the skeletal and muscular systems of the human body 
are supplemented with a first-hand study of the corresponding struc- 
tures of the cat. Emphasis is placed on the identification, structure and 
uses of muscles. Required of all students with a major in physical edu- 
cation. Two lectures and three two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Credit, 3 hours. Miss Blackiston 



92 alabama college 

Biology 212. Physiology. 

Lectures on the structure and functions of all the organs and sys- 
tems of the human are considered and demonstrated in the cat. Func- 
tions of muscles are demonstrated by the use of lower animals. Re- 
quired of all physical education and biology majors. Two lectures and 
three two-hour laboratory periods a week. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Blackiston 

Biology 221-222. General Zoology. 

Designed as a foundation course for students with a major in 
science. Animals are considered in phylogenetic groups and basic facts 
arid theories of biology are presented. Invertebrates are studied during 
the first semester and vertebrates during the second. One lecture and 
two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Credit, 6 hours. 

Mr. Bailey 

Biology 300. Bacteriology. 

A study of the morphology, physiology, and cultivation of bac- 
teria, yeast, and molds. Special consideration is given the relation of 
micro-organisms to the preservation, preparation, and handling of 
foods; their relation to water and milk supply and sewage disposal; 
and the organisms that cause disease occasionally found in various 
foods, water and milk. This course is designed for the needs of stu- 
dents taking home economics and for those desiring to know the funda- 
mental principles of bacteriology and sanitation. One lecture and two 
two-hour laboratory periods a week. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Sharp 

Biology 311, 312. General and Pathogenic Bacteriology. 

This course begins with the study of the morphology, physiology, 
cultivation, and occurrence of bacteria. Culture media are prepared, 
bacteria are isolated and identified, and a complete laboratory examina- 
tion is made of water and milk. Pure cultures of many of the patho- 
genic organisms are studied in the laboratory and methods are learned 
for isolating and identifying them.. 

The second semester deals largely with pathogenic forms not con- 
sidered in Biology 311 and with methods used in public health labora- 
tories for diagnosing specific diseases. Specimens of blood that are 
positive and negative for syphilis are obtained from the State Health 
Laboratory and the Wassermann and Kahn tests are used for identify- 
ing them. Other specimens are obtained from time to time and given 
to students for identification. Designed especially as a foundation 
course for students preparing to become medical and public health 
technicians. Prerequisite: One year of college work in biology. Two 
lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Credit, 4 hours 
each semester. Mr. Sharp 



BIOLOGY 95 

Biology 340. Biology of Vertebrates. 

A lecture and laboratory study of the anatomy and physiology of 
representative vertebrates. Two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Offered alternate years. (Noi offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 2 hours. 

Mr. Bailey 

Biology 350. Field Biology. 

This course is offered for students preparing to teach in elemen- 
tary schools and for all students with a major in biology preparing to 
teach in high school. It consists of a study of plants and animals in the 
field. Emphasis is placed on the study of birds, insects, local flora, and 
w^ild life in general. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period 
a week. Credit, 2, 3, or 4 hours. Miss Blackiston, Mr. Bailey. 

Biology 350.8. Methods of Teaching Science. 

(See Education 350.8.) Credit, 3 hours. Miss Hudson 

Biology 400. General Entomology. 

A study of the classification, economic importance, and control of 
insects. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Of- 
fered alternate years. {Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Sharp 
Biology 410. Histology. 

Emphasis will be placed on the application of methods used in the 
preservation and preparation of animal specimens for microscopic ob- 
servation. Some time will be spent in the microscopic study of tissues 
and slides prepared. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Credit, 4 hours. Mr. Bailey 

Biology 420. Parasitology. 

A study of some of the most important parasites of man, includ- 
ing protozoa, flat and round worms, and arthropods and their relation 
to disease. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 
Credit, 2 or 3 hours. Miss Blackiston, Mr. Sharp 

Biology 430. Evolution, Genetics, and Eugenics. 

A study of the Mendelian laws of heredity and how they may be 
applied. Also various theories of evolution are examined. Two lectures 
a week. Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Sharp or Miss Blackiston 

Biology 440. Coordination Course in Advanced General 
Biology. 
This is a summarizing course and is given for the purpose of in- 
tegrating and organizing the work that students have had in the de- 
partment. The student will be expected to attend lectures, give writtea 
reports of readings and other investigations, and to set up laboratory 



94 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

demonstrations from time to time. For majors and minors. Prerequisite: 
A minimum of 12 hours in biology. Three lectures a week. Credit, 3 
hours. Mr. Bailey 

Biology 450. Immunology. 

In this course a study is made of various diagnostic serological re- 
actions, rabbits are immunized and their sera are used in the making of 
agglutination and precipitation tests for identifying different types of 
bacteria. Animals are used to demonstrate immunity and susceptibility 
to various bacteria and their products. Designed for students preparing 
to become medical technicians. Prerequisite: Biology 311 and 312. One 
lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Sharp 
Biology 480. Special Problems in Biology. 

A course in laboratory problems. Two two-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Sharp 

• PRACTICAL TRAINING FOR PUBLIC HEALTH 
AND MEDICAL TECHNICIANS 

See page 74 for curriculum. 

A student desiring to substitute practical training in a hospital for 
the last 17 hours of the senior year should make application to an ap- 
propriate hospital for appointment well in advance of the senior year. 
The College will recommend all qualified students for such training. 
Upon the satisfactory completion of the practical medical technician's 
work in a hospital training school accredited by the American Medical 
Association, together with the above outlined curriculum, the Bachelor 
of Science degree will be conferred. A student may complete the hos- 
pital training for a medical technician and receive the Bachelor of 
Science degree in four years by attending only three years, one summer 
school of 12 weeks and a second summer school of 6 weeks at Ala- 
bama College. This makes it possible for a student to graduate ia the 
spring of the fourth year with the class with which she entered. The 
practical training in a hospital is not necessary to obtain a position in 
public health laboratories. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

For details concerning the Kellogg scholarship for aid to students 
in training for public health and medical technology, see page 45. 



95 

EDUCATION 

Professors Orr and Anderson; Associate Professor Philpot; 
Assistant Professor Dunn. Teachers in several other depart- 
ments cooperate with the Education Department by offering 
methods courses in their respective fields. 

Supervisors in the Laboratory School: Mrs. Balch, Miss Barksdale, 
Miss Dawson, Miss DeMent, Mr. Evans, Miss Harris, Miss 
Hudson, Miss McCauley, Miss Old, Mrs. Peterson, Miss 
Rice, Miss Rogers, Miss Sparks, Miss Walker, Miss Wells, 
Mr. Young. 

In training teachers for special fields the Department of Educa- 
tion receives the cooperation of instructors of art, home economics, 
music, physical education, secretarial science, and speech. 

The curriculum for preparing teachers for the elementary schools 
includes a course in administration and supervision. This work is pro- 
vided through arrangements with the Shelby County Board of Edu- 
cation whereby the Department of Education supervises a group of 
county schools in the vicinity of the College. This procedure serves the 
County in supervision for its teachers, and the College in training ele- 
mentary school principals. Under a similar arrangement with the Coun- 
ty Board of Education a member of the Department of Education visits 
the high schools of the county. This arrangement permits students who 
are preparing for high school teaching to supplement their work in 
the Laboratory School by observation in other high schools of the 
County. 

CURRICULA FOR TRAINING TEACHERS 

Bachelor of Arts Degree with Special Preparation for Teaching in the 
Elementary School. 

The College offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree with special preparation for teaching in the elementary schools. 
There is an increasing demand for teachers in the grades with four 
years of such training as is provided by this curriculum. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree with Special Preparation for Early Childhood 
Teaching. 

Private nursery schools and kindergartens are being operated in a 
number of localities in the state. Federal funds have been available for 
setting up nursery schools and kindergartens. The College offers a cur- 
riculum for training such teachers. 



96 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music Degrees 
for Teaching in the Secondary School. 

Students desiring to teach in the secondary schools should follow 
these curricula and should choose their major and minor subjects by 
the end of their sophomore year. Since there are a number of electives 
in each curriculum, prospective teachers should select courses with a 
view to strengthening their teaching qualifications in their chosen 
fields. 

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Music Degrees 
in the Special Subjects. 

Courses leading to degrees with training in special fields include 
art, home economics, music, physical education, secretarial science, and 
speech. 



EDUCATION 



97 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



First Semester 



FRESHMAN 



Second Semester 



English 101 3 

Foreign Language 101 3 

History 101 5 

Physical Science or 

Mathematics 101 3 

Speech 141 1 

Elective - 1 

Physical Education 100 1 



English 102.-... 3 

Foreign Language 102 3 

History 102 5 

Physical Science or 

Mathematics 102 3 

Speech 142 1 

Elective - 1 

Physical Education 110 1 



17 



17 



First Semester 



SOPHOMORE 



Second Semester 



Biology 101 3 

English 201 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 

Psychology 211 2 

Sociology 201 3 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 201 1 



Biology 102 3 

English 202 3 

Foreign Language 202 3 

Psychology 212. 2 

Sociology 202 3 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 202.. ....... 1 



17 



17 



First Semester 



Art 111 _. 2 

Education 300 „ 2 

Education 340.5 2 

English 310 3 

Geography 331 3 

Psychology 200 2 

School Music 311 2 

Phvsical Education 301 1 



JUNIOR 



Second Semester 



Art 340.1 2 

Education 3402 4 

tEnglish 461 3 

Geography 332.. 3 

Psychology 250 2 

School Music 312 2 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 



First Semester 



SENIOR 

English 421 3 

History 201 3 

Education 440 4 

♦Education 430 « 6 

Physical Education 401 1 



17 



17 



Second Semester 

English 422 3 

History 202 3 

Education 422 2 

Electives 8 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



tSpeech 340 or 351 may be substituted for English 461. 

♦Education 430 and Directed Teaching may be taken the second semes- 
ter by shifting Education 422 and Electives to the first semester. Ir- 
regular students who have credit for some of the work given in the 
Integrated Course must satisfy the following course requirements in 
Education as a substitute for this course : Education 340.4, Education 
470, and Education 490 or 442. 

Only students completing the above curriculum and the curriculum for 
Early Childhood Education can qualify for the Elementary Profes- 
sional Class B Certificate. 



98 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

English 101 3 

Foreign Language 101 3 

History 101 5 

Physical Science or 

Mathematics 101 3 

Speech 141 1 

Elective - 1 

Physical Education 100 1 



Second Semester 
102 _.... 



English 

Foreign Language 102 3 

History 102 5 

Physical Science or 

Mathematics 102 3 

Speech 142 1 

Elective - 1 

Physical Education 110 1 



17 



First Semester 

Biology 101 3 

English 201 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 

Home Economics 352 _ 2 

Psychology 211 _ 2 

Sociology 201 3 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 
SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester 

Biology 102 3 

English 202 3 

Foreign Language 202 3 

Home Economics 272 _ 2 

Psychology 212 2 

Sociology 202 3 

Physical Education 202 1 



17 
JUNIOR 



17 



First Semester 



Art 111 2 

Education 300 2 

Education 340.2 4 

English 310 3 

Geography 331 3 

School Music 311 2 

Physical Education 301 1 



Second Semester 
Art 340.1 2 

Speech 340 or 351 3 

Geography 332 3 

Home Economics 340 -. 4 

Psychology 250 2 

School Music 312 2 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 
SENIOR 



17 



First Semester 

English 421 3 

History 201 3 

^Education 440 _ 4 

'Education 430 6 

Physical Education 401 1 



17 



Second Semester 

English 422 3 

History 202.... 3 

Home Economics 400 _. 2 

Psychology 200 2 

^Elective 6 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



^Student Teaching in both the Nursery School and Kindergarten or 
lower elementary grades. 

tSeminar dealing with problems growing out of student teaching. Meth- 
ods of teaching young children, principles of teaching, testing, phi- 
losophy of education, the curriculum, etc., will be dealt with. 

tThose expecting to teach in Nursery School should elect Student 
Teaching in the Nursery School (2 hours). Other desirable electives 
are: Psychology 370 (Intelligence Testing), Psychology 330 (Mental 
Hygiene), and Education 422 (History of Education). 



EDUCATION 



99 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
SECONDARY EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



English 101. 



English 102 3 

^Foreign Language 101 3 foreign Language 102 3 

History 102 5 

Physical Science or 

Mathematics 102 3 

Speech 142 1 

Elective - 1 

Physical Education 110 1 



History 101. 
Physical Science or 

Mathematics 101 3 

Speech 141 1 



Elective 

Physical Education 100. 



. 1 
. 1 

17 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



English 201 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 

Psychology 201 3 

Biology 101 3 

Sociology 201 3 

Elective _ 1 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



EngHsh 202 3 

Foreign Language 202 3 

Psychology 202 3 

Biology 102 3 

Sociology 202 3 

Elective 1 

Phvsical Education 202 1 



17 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Major Subject 3 

Minor Subject _ 3 

Education 310 3 

Education 350 (Major) 3 

Electives _ 4 

Physical Education 301 1 



Second Semester 

Major Subject 3 

Minor Subject.. _ 3 

Education 320 3 

Education 350 (Major).... 3 

Electives _ 4 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 
SENIOR 



17 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Major Subject.... _ 3 

Education 450.... 4 

^Education 480 6 

Electives 3 

Physical Education 401 1 



Major Subject- - 3 

Electives 13 

Phvsical Education 402 1 



17 



17 



■f Students desiring a major in mathematics may defer foreign language 
or science to the sophomore year. 

^Education 480 and Directed Teaching may be taken either semester. 
Irregular students who have credit for some of the work given in the 
Integrated Course must satisfy the following course requirements in 
Education amounting to 8 semester hours, as a substitute for this 
■course: Education 410 or 420, Education 432 or 460, Education 442 or 
461, and Education 490. 



100 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Education 300. Principles of Elementary School Teaching. 

This course seeks to develop principles that will help teachers solve 
problems of classroom management. It includes a study of important 
elements of classroom environment, planning and carrying out daily^ 
programs, discipline, school records and evaluation. Credit, 2 or 5 hours. 

Miss Dunn 

Education 310. Principles of High School Teaching. 

A study of problems and procedures common to all high school 
teachers, such as class management, teaching techniques, discipline, mo- 
tivation, tests, and testing. Textbook, library readings, reports, and 
term paper. Required of all applicants for the Secondary Professional 
Class B and Temporary Class B certificates, and all special certificates 
to teach in high school. Open to juniors and seniors. Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Orr and Mr. Philpot 

Education 320. Psychology of Secondary Education. 

A study of such topics as the laws of learning, reasoning and 
imagination, transfer of training, individual difference, and their effect 
on the learning of various high school subjects. Textbook, library read- 
ing, reports and term Tpsiper. Re quired of all applicants for the Second- 
ary Professional Class B and Temporary Class B certificates, and certain 
special certificates to teach in high school. Prerequisite: A course in 
general psychology. Open to juniors and seniors. Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Philpot 

Education 340. The Teaching of The Several Elementary 

School Subjects. 

The courses below under the general heading Education 340 con- 
sist of methods, materials and techniques in teaching the several 
elementary school subjects. Some observation of leaching is also in- 
cluded. 

Education 340.1. The Teaching of Art in the Elementary 

Grades. 

For students studying for the Bachelor of Arts degree with train- 
ing in elementary education. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Allen 

Education 340.2. The Teaching of the Language Arts in the 

Elementary Grades. 

This course deals with the teaching of reading, literature, language, 
spelling, and writing in the first six grades. Required of all students 
for the Bachelor of Arts degree with training in elementary education 
preparatory to teaching in the elementary grades. Credit, 4 hours. 
Miss Dunn and Laboratory School Supervisors 



education 101 

Education 340.4. The Teaching of the Soci/vl Sciences in the 

Elementary Grades. 

This course deals with the entire field of social science in the 
first six grades. Required of all students studying for the Bachelor of 
Arts degree tvith training in elementary education preparatory to teach- 
ing in the grades. Credit, 2 hours. 

Laboratory School Supervisors 

Education 340.5. The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Elemen- 
tary Grades. 

This course deals with the teaching of numbers in the lower grades 
and the teaching of arithmetic in the upper grades. Required of all 
students studying for the Bachelor of Arts degree with training in ele- 
mentary education preparatory to teaching in the grades. Credit, 2 
hours. Miss Dunn 

Education 340.6. The Teaching of Elementary School Music. 
A course designed to fit music into the elementary school pro- 
gram. A study of the child voice, rhythms, creative work, and of how 
to lay the foundations of sound musicianship, as well as to provide 
pleasure for the less musical child. A survey of materials and use of 
radio and victrola. Three hours a week. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Farrah 

Education 340.7. The Teaching of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation in the Elementary School. 

Survey and discussion of the health and physical education pro- 
gram for the elementary school with special emphasis on conditions in 
the elementary schools of Alabama. Directed observation in the Labora- 
tory School. Credit, 2 hours. Miss McCauley 

Education 340.8 The Teaching of Science in the Elementary 

School. 

This course deals with the subject matter, materials and methods 
of teaching the science proposed in the Alabama Course of Study. 
(Not offered 1948-1949). Credit, 2 hours. 

Education 350. The Teaching of the Several High School 

Subjects. 

The courses below under the general heading Education 350 con- 
sist of methods, materials and techniques of teaching the several high 
school subjects. Some observation is included also. 

Education 350.1. The Teaching of Art in High School. 

Required of all students studying for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
with training in secondary education and ivith a major or a minor in 
art. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Allen 



102 alabama college 

Education 350.2. The Teaching of English in High School. 

Required of all students studying for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
with training in secondary education and with a major or a minor in 
English. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Walker 

Education 350.3. The Teaching of Foreign Languages in High 
School. 

Required of all students studying for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
with training in secondary education and with a major or a minor in 
foreign languages. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Pierson, Mr. Reinke, Miss Stockton 

Education 350.4. The Teaching of Social Science in High 
School. 

Required of all students studying for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
with training in secondary education and tvith a major or a minor in 
social science. Credit, 3 hours. MiSS Barksdale 

Education 350.5. The Teaching of Mathematics in High 

School. 

Required of all students studying for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
with training in secondary education and with a major or a minor in 
mathematics. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Braswell 

Education 350.6. The Teaching of School Music in High 

School. 

Objectives of elementary theory and harmony at the secondary 
school level. Psychology of the underlying preceptions and imageries. 
Construction of exercise and creative problems. Appreciation: the basis 
of constructive listening, aesthetic objectives, materials. Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. LeBaron 

Education 350.7. The Teaching of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation IN High School. 

Survey and discussion of health and physical education problems of 
the secondary school with special emphasis on the state high school pro- 
gram. Detailed study of the "State Course of Study in Health and Phy- 
sical Education for Junior and Senior High School Girls." Directed 
observation in the Laboratory School. Required of all juniors with a 
major in physical education. Credit, 3 hours Miss McCauley 

Education 350.8. The Teaching of Science in High School. 

Required of students with a major or a minor in science who are 
preparing to teach in high school. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Hudson 

Education 350.9. The Teaching of Speech in High School. 

Required of students with a major or a minor in speech who are 
preparing to teach in high school. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Gould 



EDUCATION 105 

Education 350.10. The Teaching of Secretarial Science in 
High School. 

Required of students preparing to teach secretarial work in high 
school. Credit, 5 hours. Miss Brownfield 

Education 370. Directed Observation in the Elementary 

School. 

This course, an introduction to directed teaching, includes observa- 
tion and discussion of the teaching of all elementary school subjects. 
Credit, 2 hours. MiSS DuNN 

Education 381. Progressive Procedures in the Elementary 

School. 

This course is designed primarily to give to in-service teachers a 
clear understanding of the more modern practices in the field of Ele- 
mentary Education. It is planned from a practical standpoint, using the 
new State Course of Study as a guide, so that teachers may find im- 
mediate help in meeting the everyday problems within the classroom. 
(Offered by correspondence only). Credit, 2 hours. Mrs. Peterson 

Education 410. Extra-Curricular Activities, 

The philosophy of the extra-curricular program, as well as contact 
with such a program in the Laboratory School, is given in this course. 
Special attention is given values of curricular and extra-curricular ac- 
tivities in high school as they affect attitudes. Credit, 2 hours. 

Mr, Anderson 

Education 420. Guidance in High School, 

By a rapid survey of the literature in the field, this course intro- 
duces to the student the problems of educational and vocational guid- 
ance and sets up standards for a comprehensive guidance program 
such as is feasible in the high schools of the State. The Alabama pro- 
gram for guidance through occupational studies for boys and girls is 
studied as one unit of the course. Open to juniors and seniors. Credit, 
2 hours. Mr, Anderson 

Education 422. Public Education in the United States. 

A discussion of the development of the American school system, 
its beginning and organization. Required of all students in the elemen- 
tary curriculum. Credit, 2 or 5 hours. Miss Dunn, Mr, Orr 

Education 430. Integrated Course for Elementary Teachers. 
This course should be taken at the time Directed Teaching is taken. 
It consists of the study of those problems which arise from contact 
with school and classroom practices in the Elementary Laboratory 
School. Students come in contact with practically all phases of work in 
the elementary school, and the work in theory, methods, and philosophy 



104 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

is developed in connection with practice. Essential features of the fol- 
lowing courses previously given as independent units are included: 
Methods of Teaching Social Studies, Tests and Measurements in Ele- 
mentary Education, Curriculum Making, and Philosophy of Education. 
With Directed Teaching and Education 422, the course satisfies all 
the educational requirements of the senior year, which are as follows 
in the A.B. Elementary Curriculum: 

Education 340.4: 2 semester hours credit. 

Education 470: 2 semester hours credit. 

Education 442 or 490 : 2 semester hours credit. 

Irregular students must take the above independent courses separ- 
ately. Credit for the Integrated Course, 6 hours. 

Miss Dunn, Mr. Orr 

Education 432. Test Construction. 

A study of the relative merits of the various testing techniques, a 
comparison of teacher-made and standardized tests, marks, and mark- 
ings, and enough statistics to interpret and report the more common 
facts of measurement. Sample tests are critically examined. Each student 
prepares a set of tests for a high school subject in her major field. Open 
to juniors and seniors. Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Anderson 

Education 440. Directed Teaching and Observation in the 

Elementary Grades. 

Required of all students expecting to apply for the Elementary 
Professional Class B certificate. Credit, 4 hours. 

Laboratory School Supervisors 

Education 442. Orientation in Curriculum Making. 

A first course taking up the basic principles underlying the curricu- 
lum, the need for curriculum changes, and discussion of the curriculum 
on the different school levels. Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Orr 

Education 450. Directed Teaching and Observation in the 

High School. 

Required of all students applying for the Secondary Professional 
Class B certificate. Students will not be permitted to teach in subjects 
in which their college grades have been below C. Directed teaching is 
done in the students' major and minor fields. Directed Teaching, Edu- 
cation 450, is numbered as follows to indicate the teaching field: 450.1, 
Art; 450.2, English; 450.3, Foreign Language; 450.4, Social Science; 
450.5, Mathematics; 450.6, Music; 450.7, Health and Physical Educa- 
tion; 450.8, Science; 450.9, Speech; 450.10, Secretarial Science. Credit, 
4 hours. Laboratory School Supervisors 

Education 451. Understanding the Adolescent. 

This course is an attempt to understand better the nature and prob- 
lems of adolescent boys and girls through direct contacts with them. 



EDUCATION ■ 105 

It includes the use of such devices as the educational case study and the 
anecdotal record. Credit, 1 or 2 hours. Mr, Anderson 

Education 452. Techniques in Curriculum Construction, 

A second course which, assuming a knowledge of the principle 
underlying the curriculum, includes a study of techniques in obtainmg 
the objectives set up. Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Orr 

Education 460. Tests and Measurements in Secondary Edu- 
cation. 

This course is designed to givt an understanding of the significance 
of modern testing procedures, and to furnish actual experience in ad- 
ministering tests and evaluating their results. Both old and new types 
of tests and examinations are studied. The theory of testing, includmg 
elementary statistical procedures and their application to classroom use, 
is considered. Practice is given in the preparation of tests, as well as in 
giving tests and scoring papers. Open to seniors. Credit, 2 hours. 

Mr. Anderson, Mr. Orr 

Education 461. Principles of Secondary Education. 

This course is a study of the accepted principles of secondary edu- 
cation, including discussion of the issues involved. The meaning and 
practices of the high school are discussed from the point of view of 
history, religion, politics, and society. Emphasis is placed on the func- 
tion of the high school. Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Anderson 

Education 462. Laboratory Course in Curriculum Construc- 
tion. 

A course for advanced students only. Designed for individual in- 
terests, with practical work in curriculum construction and in building 
curriculum practices. Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Orr 

Education 470. Tests and Measurements in Elementary Edu- 
cation. 

The objectives taken up in this course are the same as in Education 
460 with the exception that they are definitely applied to subjects in 
the elementary field. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Dunn, Mr. Orr 

Education 472. Administration of School Attendance. 

This course is arranged primarily to meet the needs of those pre- 
paring for school attendance work. Such topics as the background of 
public education, the beginnings of compulsory education, Alabama 
school laws relating to attendance, and the relation between the attend- 
ance officer and other school officials are considered. Reading, reports, 
and term paper. Open to juniors and seniors. Credit, 2 hours. 

Mr. Philpot 



106 alabama college 

Education 480. Integrated Course for Secondary Teachers. 
This course should be taken at the time Directed Teaching is 
taken. It consists of the study of those problems which arise from con- 
tact with school and classroom practices in the Laboratory High School. 
Students come in contact with practically all phases of work in the 
high school, and the work in theory and philosophy is developed in 
connection with practice. Essential features of the following courses 
previously given as independent units are included: Extra-Curricular 
Activities, Guidance in the High School, Test Construction, Junior 
High School Problems and Methods, Tests and Measurements in Sec- 
ondary Education, principles of Secondary Education, and Philosophy of 
Education. With Directed Teaching, the course satisfies all the Educa- 
tion requirements of the senior year, which are as follows in the A. B. 
Secondary Curriculum: 

Education 410 or 420: 2 semester hours credit. 

Education 432 or 460: 2 semester hours credit. 

Education 442 or 461 or 490: 2 semester hours credit. 

Irregular students must take 6 or 8 semester hours of the above 
independent courses separately. Education 490 is not required in all 
curricula leading to teachers* certificates. Credit for the Integrated 
Course, 6 hours. Mr. Anderson, Mr. Orr 

Education 481, 482. Elementary School Administration, 

This course is open to a limited number of students who show 
special talent for this type of work. It gives practical training by actual 
supervisory work in the county schools. Prerequisite: senior standing in 
the elementary curriculum. Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

Miss Dunn 

Education 490. Philosophy of Education, 

This course guides in the development of a sound philosophy of 
education. Present day philosophies of education are analyzed and the 
history of education considered as it contributes to the main objective 
of the course. Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Orr 

LABORATORY SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS 
The College has a cooperative arrangement with the County Board 
of Education whereby the Montevallo Elementary, Junior High, and 
Senior High Schools serve as laboratory schools for the Department 
of Education. A Kindergarten is a part of the elementary school. The 
Hi^h School is accredited by both the State Department of Education 
and the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. In 
each grade an experienced teacher is in charge of the student teach- 
ing. The laboratory schools offer observation, participation and teach- 
ing facilities for those preparing for elementary and secondary teach- 



EDUCATION 107 

ing and for teaching in such special fields as art, home economics, 
piano, public school music, violin, secretarial science, speech, and physi- 
cal education. Only members of the College senior class are assigned 
to teaching in the laboratory schools. 

The courses in methods should precede a student's teaching in the 
elementary school, but may be taken at the same time. The courses in 
methods of teaching a student's major and minor subjects should pre- 
cede a student's teaching these subjects in the high school, but may be 
taken parallel. 

TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

The Class B Secondary Professional Certificate, valid for eight 
years, may be issued to a graduate of the College who has completed 
the curriculum approved for the training of secondary teachers. This 
certificate, which may be continued for another period of eight years 
upon the completion of four years of successful, regular teaching ex- 
perience during the eight years immediately preceding the date of lapse 
of the certificate, authorizes the holder to teach the subjects named in 
its face and other high school subjects as conditions may require. 

The Class B Temporary Certificate, valid for three years, may be 
issued to a graduate of the College who has completed certain pre- 
scribed courses of the curriculum approved for the training of sec- 
ondary teachers. This certificate authorizes the holder to teach the sub- 
jects named in its face and other high school subjects as conditions may 
require. This certificate is not subject to renewal. 

The Class B Elementary Professional Certificate, valid for eight 
years, may be issued to a graduate of the College who has completed 
the curriculum outlined for the preparation of elementary teachers. 
This certificate, which may be continued for another period of eight 
years upon the completion of four years of successful, regular teach- 
ing experience during the eight years immediately preceding the date 
of the lapse of the certificate, authorizes the holder to teach in grades 
one through six, or in junior high school as conditions may require. 

The Class C Elementary Professional Certificate, valid for six 
years, may be issued to a student who has completed three years of the 
curriculum outlined for the preparation of elementary teachers. This 
certificate, which may be continued for another period of six years 
upon the completion of three years of successful, regular teaching 
experience during the six years immediately preceding the date of lapse 
of the certificate, authorizes the holder to teach in grades one through 
six, or in junior high school as conditions may require. 

The Class B Special Professional Certificate, in a subject such as 
Piano, Public School Music, Violin, Band, and Orchestra, may be is- 



108 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

sued to a recent graduate of a standard institution the courses of which 
have been approved for the training of teachers of such special sub- 
jects, and who has a minimum of thirty semester hours of credit in 
the special subject in which the certificate is sought. This certificate, 
valid for eight years, may be continued for another period of eight 
years upon the completion of four years of successful, regular teaching 
experience during the eight years immediately preceding the date of 
lapse of the certificate. 

Due to the war emergency, the Alabama State Department of Edu- 
cation has set up a new certificate to be issued until further notice: 

The Defense Certificate will be issued upon the request of a county 
or city superintendent to a person who has had as much as one year 
of college work. This is not a regular teaching certificate, and the 
holder is not entitled to the benefits of the tenure law. 



109 



ENGLISH 



Professors Vaughan, Dennis, Trumbauer; Associate Professors 
GoLsoN, Meroney, Reinke; Assistant Professor Puryear; 
Instructors Jeter*, Leonard, Wallace*, Ward. 

MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS 

Candidates for the A.B. Liberal Arts or the A.B. Secondary degree 
with a major or minor in English should take (in addition to the 12 
hours of English required in all curricula for the freshman and sopho- 
more years) a specified minimum of hours of advanced English: 15 
hours for the major, 9 hours for the minor. Students with either a 
major or a minor in English are expected to plan, in consultation with 
the head of the department, a balanced program from the courses 
offered in the following five fields: (1) the history of English litera- 
ture (330, 370, 380); (2) the history of American literature (420, 
421, 422); (3) drama and novel (340, 430, 451, 452); (4) the 
English language (461, 462); (5) advanced composition (261, 262, 
360, 361, 362). 

A.B. Secondary students who wish to include in the English major 
requirement the Speech courses most helpful for the high school teacher 
of English will select a course from each of three of the English fields 
named above and will elect Speech 210, 390, and 450. 

In the A.B. Elementary curriculum the special English requirement 
of 12 hours includes the following: (1) Literature for Children 310; 

(2) Problems in English Grammar 461, or directed Speech 340 or 351; 

(3) Survey of American Literature 421, and 422 or 420. 

THE ENGLISH LABORATORY 

All students, but particularly those in the freshman year, who are 
found to be poorly prepared in the fundamentals of English composi- 
tion or reading comprehension may be asked to spend two hours each 
week in the English laboratory, where each student is given special 
drill adapted to her individual needs. During the progress of any 
course in the College a student found to be weak in the essentials of 
English may be recommended to the Laboratory by her instructor, or 
at the end of the term may be given a Laboratory Condition for the 
course. This condition can be removed only on recommendation of the 
Laboratory instructor. 

English 101-102. Freshman English. 

The year's work includes much practice writing in the more com- 
monly used forms of composition and reading for ideas. Emphasis du- 



^Tempcrary appointment. 



110 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

ring the first term is on basic composition and related skills; during 
the second, on reading and thinking habits. To cover the cost of certain 
materials ordered in quantities, there is a Materials Fee of $1.00 each 
semester. Prerequisite to all advanced English courses. Credit, 6 hours. 

Miss Golson, Chairman 

English 111, 112. Guided Periodical Reading. 

Guided reading, chiefly in current periodicals, is available each 
semester for a limited number of first-year students. Class discussions 
and simple written reports are supplemented by individual conferences. 
Sections are limited to fifteen students each. Credit, 1 hour each se- 
mester. Mrs. Ward 

English 200. Types of Poetry. 

A study of English poetry by type and theme, designed also to 
serve as a general introduction to the study of literature on the college 
level (Offered at present by correspondence only.) Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Vaughan 

English 201-202. Development of Modern Literature. 

A survey course in the development of thought and form in mod- 
ern literature. Study of the major English writers is supplemented by 
reading in the literatures of America and Europe. The first semester is 
devoted chiefly to the Romantic era and the second to the Victorian. 
Practice in critical writing continues throughout the course. Required 
in all curricula. Prerequisite to all more advanced English courses. 
Credit, 6 hours. 

Mr. Vaughan, Miss Golson, Miss Meroney, Miss Puryear 

English 211,212. Guided Reading in Contemporary Literature. 
During one semester the emphasis will be on the short story; dur- 
ing the other, on other types of prose and drama. Sections are limited to 
twelve students each. Credit, 1 hour each semester. Mr. Vaughan 

English 261. The Writing of News. 

An elementary course in journalism dealing with the principles of 
news writing and the organization of newspapers. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Leonard 

English 262. Feature and Editorial Writing, 

Study and practice in feature-story and editorial writing, with con- 
sideration of the reader-approach to journalistic techniques. Credit, 2 
hours. Miss Leonard 

English 310. Literature for Children. 

Study of the types of literature and the best examples of each type 
available for us in the school and the home. Required in the Bachelor 
of Arts Elementary curriculum. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Puryear 



ENGLISH 111 

English 330. English Literature: The Beginnings. 

Early literature in translation; medieval thought and attitudes cul- 
minating in the age of Chaucer. Credit, 3 hours. Miss GoLSON 

English 340. Principles and Development of the Drama. 

A survey course with emphasis on development of forms and 
techniques. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Trumbauer 

English 350. The Classics in Translation. 

Reading in English of the masterpieces of Greek and Roman litera- 
ture. Lectures, discussions, reports. No knowledge of Greek or Latin 
required. (Students electing this course for two hours' credit will de- 
vote their attention to Greek literature only.) Credit, 2 or 5 hours. 

Mr. Reinke 
English 360. Advanced Composition. 

Review of the principles of rhetoric with practice writing in the 
forms of discourse. Recommended especially for students who expect 
to teach English but lack facility in composition. Credit, 2 or 5 hours. 

Mr. Vaughan, Mjss Golson 

English 361, 362. Creative Writing. 

Guided writing in poetry, short story, essay, play. Credit, 2 hours 
each semester. Miss Dennis 

English 370. Spenser, Milton, and Their Times: 1500-1660. 

A study of the literature and the periods from the Renaissance 
through the Elizabethan age of the Restoration, with emphasis upon 
Spenser and especially Milton; drama is not included. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Dennis 

English 380. The Age of Classicism: 1660-1790. 

The literature of England from the Restoration through the eight- 
eenth century, its aims, ideas, and achievements, including the early 
manifestations of romanticism. (Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 
hours. Miss Dennis 

English 420. Literature and Southern Life. 

An advanced course in American Literature with emphasis upon 
social backgrounds and themes. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Meroney 

English 421. Survey of American Literature. 

A survey of the major nineteenth century American writers. Credit, 
3 hours. Miss Meroney 

English 422. American Regionalism. 

A study of American life as revealed through regional literature. 
Credit, 3 hours. Miss Meroney 



112 alabama college 

English 430. Masterpieces of the Novel. 

A study of certain selected classics in the novel with the aim of 
developing criticism and appreciation. Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Vaughan, Miss Dennis 

English 451. Shakespeare. 

An advanced course. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Trumbauer 

English 452. Contemporary Drama. 

European and American dramas since 1890, with historical and 
literary backgrounds. (Not offered 1948-1949)- Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Trumbauer 

English 461. Problems in English Grammar. 

Selected problems in present English usage are examined in the 
light of the history of the language and recent trends. Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Vaughan 

English 462. The English Language. 

A survey of the problems involved in acquiring mastery of the 
English language. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Dennis 



113 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



Professor Pierson; Associate Professors Stockton, Reinke; 
Instructor Morales. 

FRENCH 
French 101-102. Introduction to the French Language. 

A beginning course in French with the emphasis on acquiring the 
fundamental essentials of grammar, a reading knowledge of French of 
moderate difficulty, an intelligible pronunciation, and an ability to 
understand spoken French within the vocabulary range of the class. 
Credit, 6 hours. Miss Pierson 

*French 121, 122; 221, 222; 321, 322; 421, 422; 431, 432. Con- 
versation. 

Laboratory classes in elementary, intermediate, and advanced con- 
versation. Elective. Students who minor in French should elect 321, 
322. Students who major in French should elect 321, 322 and 421, 
422. Two hours a week. Credit, 1 hour each semester. Miss Pierson 

French 201-202. Modern Prose, Poetry, and Drama. 

An introduction to the French people, their history, government, 
literature, and art. The main currents in French literature are presented 
through the reading of selected works of representative French authors. 
Attention is given to acquiring facility in oral and written French. 
'Prerequisite: two years of preparatory French or one year of college 
French. Credit, 6 hours. MiSS PiERSON 

French 300. Advanced Composition and Conversation. 

Credit, 3 hours. Miss Pierson 

French 320. The French Drama. 

This course traces briefly the development of French dramatic lit- 
erature from the seventeenth century to the present. This course al- 
ternates with French 360. Credit, 5 hours. Miss Pierson 

French 330. The Modern Novel. 

A study of the French novel with special emphasis on the nine- 
teenth century. This course alternates with French 370. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Pierson 

French 350.3. Methods of Teaching French. 

(See Education 350.3.) (Not offered 1948-1949-) Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Pierson 

French 360. Survey of French Literature to 1700. 

(Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours. Miss Pierson 



♦Native students assist with these courses. 



114 alabama college 

French 370. Survey of French Literature Since 1700. 

(Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours. Miss Pierson 

French 410. History of the French Language, 

(Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 5 hours. Miss Pierson 

French 430. Contemporary French Literature in the 
Twentieth Century. 
Credit, 3 hours. Miss Pierson 

GERMAN 

German 101-102. Elementary German. 

Grammar, composition, pronunciation, selected reading texts of 
moderate difficulty. Credit, 6 hours. Mr. Reinke 

German 201-202. Intermediate German. 

Reading in class of representative works of modern authors; col- 
lateral reading; review syntax and composition. Credit, 6 hours. 

Mr. Reinke 
German 221, 222; 321, 322. Conversation. 

Two hours a week. Credit, 1 hour each semester. Mr. Reinke 

German 320. The German Classical Drama. 

Special emphasis is given to the masterpieces of Lessing, Goethe, 
and Schiller. Parallel reading and reports. Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Reinke 
German 330. The German Novel. 

A study of the German novel and its historical development. Paral- 
lel reading and reports. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Reinke 

GREEK 

Greek 101-102. Introduction to Greek Language 

and Literature. 

First semester: Fundamentals of the Language. Second semester: 
Selected readings from classical Greek authors and from the New 
Testament. Elective for students of junior or senior standing. Offered 
in alternate years. (Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 6 hours. 

Mr. Reinke 
Classics 350. The Classics in Translation. 

Reading in English of the masterpieces of Greek and Roman lit- 
erature. Lectures, discussions, reports. No knowledge of Greek or Latin 
required. (Students electing this course for two hours' credit will de- 
vote their attention to Greek literature only.) Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 

Mr. Reinke 

LATIN 

Latin 101-102. Introduction to Latin Language 

AND Literature. 

First semester: Fundamentals of the Language. Second semester: 
Selections of moderate difficulty from Caesar and other Latin authors. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 115 

Open to students who have not offered Latin for entrance. Credit, 6 
hours. Mr. Reinke 

Latin 210. Ciceronian Prose. 

Selections from the orations, letters and essays of Cicero; Cicero 
as statesman, philosopher, and man of letters; Roman public and pri- 
vate life during the last days of the Republic. Readings from other 
prose writers of the Ciceronian Period. Grammar and Composition. 
Open to students who have completed Latin 101-102, or two years of 
high school Latin. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Reinke 

Latin 220. Augustan Poetry. 

Reading of parts of Virgil's Aeneid; study of the poem as a 
whole, with consideration of the style, meter, mythology, and social 
and moral aspects; its place in the history of the epic; the personality 
of the poet. Selections from other poets of the Augustan Age. Prere- 
quisite: Latin 210 or its equivale?7t. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Reinke 

Latin 320. Latin Composition. 

The writing of narrative Latin prose with study of syntax and 
structure of the sentence and paragraph. Required of students with a 
major or minor in Latin. (Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Reinke 
Latin 330. The Roman Lyric. 

(a) Catullus: Selected poems; lyric measures; historical back- 
ground, (b) Horace: Odes and Epodes; literary technique; relation of 
Horace to his age. The two poets are compared and their influence on 
English literature is discussed. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Reinke 

Latin 340. Roman History. 

Selections from Livy and other Roman historians; interpretation 
and significance of their work; study of personalities of the writers. 

Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Reinke 

Latin 350.3. Methods of Teaching Latin. 

(See Education 350.3.) (Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Reinke 

Latin 370. Pliny and Martial, 

(Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Reinke 

Latin 380. Plautus and Terence. 

(Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Reinke 

Latin 401, 402. Survey of Latin Literature. 

(Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

Mr. Reinke 



116 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

SPANISH 

Spanish 101-102. Elementary Spanish. 

Credit, 6 hours. Miss Stockton 

^Spanish 121, 122; 221, 222; 321, 322; 421, 422. Conversation. 

Laboratory classes in elementary, intermediate, and advanced con- 
versation. Students who minor in Spanish are requested to elect 321,. 
322. Students who major in Spanish are requested to elect 321, 322; 
421, 422. Elective. Two hours a week. Credit, 1 hour each semester. 

Miss Stockton 
Spanish 201-202. Intermediate Spanish. 

This course includes rapid reading of prose, including a Spanish 
newspaper, simple conversation, and review of such grammar as is 
necessary for these purposes. Credit, 6 hours. 

Miss Morales, Miss Stockton 

Spanish 300. Current Spanish. 

This course is designed to give familiarity with a vocabulary of 
current problems, practice in letter writing, in listening to broadcasts in. 
Spanish, and in the oral use of the language. It differs from the gen- 
eral courses in that it will be confined to students who have some facil- 
ity in the use of Spanish. With the consent of the instructor it may be- 
taken in place of Spanish 202. Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 

Miss Morales, Miss Stockton 

Spanish 320. Advanced Composition and Conversation. 

(Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours. Miss Stockton 

Spanish 341, 342. Spanish- American Literature. 

(Not offered 1948-1949-) Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

Miss Morales, Miss Stockton 

Spanish 350.3. Methods of Teaching Spanish. 

(See Education 350.3.) Credit, 3 hours. Miss Stockton 

Spanish 360. Literature of the Caribbean Countries. 

Credit, 3 hours. Miss Stockton 

Spanish 370. South American Literature. 

(Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours. Miss Stockton 

Spanish 381, 382. Contemporary Prose. 

(Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

Miss Stockton 
Spanish 420. The Spanish Drama. 

Credit, 3 hours. Miss Stockton 

Spanish 430. The Spanish Novel. 

Credit, 3 hours. Miss Stockton: 



♦Native students assist with these courses. 



117 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND 
RECREATION 

Professor McCall; Associate Professors Finger, Saylor; 

Assistant Professor Lundquist; Instructors 

Deason, Foreman. 

In accordance with the requirement of eight hours of health and 
physical education for graduation, each student should enroll in a 
course of physical education each semester. 

The Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
offers a variety of activity courses planned to meet the needs and in- 
terests of all students. Each freshman student should enroll in physi- 
cal Education 100, 110. Ail transfers who have not met the require- 
ments of Physical Education 110 enroll in this course during the first 
or second semester. Other students may select the activities they wish 
to take to fulfill the remainder of the eight semester hours required. 
Students with a physical disability are assigned to special classes ac- 
cording to their individual needs. 

Students desiring to major in Physical Education are referred to 
page 77 for a list of the requirements leading to the Bachelor of 
Science degree in Physical Education, 

A sequence of courses for students not majoring in the depart- 
ment will be planned for those interested in taking more than the re- 
quired eight hours in Physical Education. Majors in biology and physi- 
cal science may have a minor in the field by beginning work in the 
junior year. 

The following is a list of the courses included in the activity pro- 
gram. Students take beginning, intermediate or advanced courses ac- 
cording to previous training or ability. Beginning and intermediate 
courses are a prerequisite to advanced courses in the field. 

ACTIVITY COURSES OPEN TO MAJORS AND NON-MAJORS 
IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

ARCHERY Miss Saylor 

Beginning: Fundamental techniques of the sport, including in- 
struction in the care and upkeep of equipment. 

Intermediate: Fundamental techniques are reviewed, and students 
shoot Columbia Rounds. 

Advanced: Fundamental techniques are reviewed, and students 
shoot Columbia Rounds. 



118 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

BADMINTON Staff 

Beginning: Instruction in the simple fundamentals of badminton, 
including the forehand and backhand drives, the clear and the serve. 
The rules, etiquette and theory of playing a game are taught and 
practiced. 

Advanced: Review of the fundamentals of the game with advanc- 
ed instruction in the smash and drop shot. Emphasis on attainment of 
skill in all strokes. Consideration of court strategy and rules in both 
singles and doubles games. 

BASKETBALL Staff 

Instruction and practice in the elementary fundamentals including 
catching, passing, guarding, shooting and floor technique. 

CALISTHENICS Staff 

This course includes theory and practice in marching and calis- 
thenics. 

FOLK DANCE Miss Foreman, Miss Lundquist 

A comprehensive course including dances and singing games from 
various countries; methods of teaching them; background of dances; 
costumes and methods of making them; characteristics of dances of 
each country; May fetes, folk festivals; and a survey of literature in 
the field. 

FRESHMAN ORIENTATION Staff 

The purpose of this program is to give entering students an in- 
troduction to the following team sports : volley ball, hockey and sof tball. 

GAMES Miss Lundquist 

This course includes games of low organization classified accord- 
ing to age levels in elementary and high schools for playground and 
classroom instruction, introduction to singing games, lead-up games 
to major team sports, characteristics for each age group, technique of 
teaching various types of games, and a bibliography of related lit- 
erature. During latter part of course opportunities are given students 
to teach games under directed supervision. 

GOLF Miss Finger 

Beginning: Instruction and practive in the use of the woods, irons 

and putter. Study of the rules of the game. 

Intermediate: Instruction and practice in advanced techniques. 

Analysis of game situations and study of the history and rules of the 

game. 

HOCKEY Staff 

Instruction and practice in fundamentals including running, driv- 
ing, fielding, dribbling, and team plays. 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 119 

HYGIENE Staff 

This course deals with problems of personal and community hy- 
giene and is designed for the student to develop a broad understanding 
of her obligations to herself and society in matters of health. 

MODERN DANCE 

Beginning: Practice and theory in the fundamentals of movement 
and rhythm and their application to dance composition. 

Intermediate: Introduction to more advanced techniques and com- 
position. Survey of the development of dance. 

Advanced: Particular emphasis upon the perfection of individual 
techniques, advanced study of dance forms and group and individual 
composition. Study of the development of dance and of personalities 
in dance. 

RECREATIONAL SPORTS Miss Finger, Miss Lundquist 

A course designed to provide an opportunity for the individual to 
develop proficient skills in some of the recreational sports and to be- 
come familiar with the pattern of play in a number of others. The 
sports included in this course are: shuffleboard, table tennis, croquet, 
horse shoes, darts, bowling, box hockey and paddle tennis. 

SOCCER Staff 

Instruction and practice in fundamentals including running, kick- 
ing and trapping. 

SOCIAL DANCE Miss Finger, Miss Foreman 

Instruction and practice in social dance, including a study of the 
basic techniques of the waltz and fox trot. 

SOFTBALL Staff 

Instruction and practice in the fundamentals of Softball, including 
catching, pitching, base running and team plays. 

SQUARE DANCE Miss Finger, Miss Foreman 

Instruction and practice in Square Dance, including a study of the 
styles and characteristics as they are done in different sections of the 
country. 

SWIMMING Miss Deason, Miss Finger, Miss Foreman 

Beginning: Instruction in the fundamentals of swimming includ- 
ing water safety principles, elementary strokes — such as the elementary 
back stroke, elementary crawl stroke, the side stroke, and the elements 
of beginning diving. 

Intermediate (Low and High) : Review of fundamentals. Further 
instruction in the American crawl, racing back stroke, side stroke, and 
the elements of spring board diving. 



120 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Advanced: Review of fundamental strokes and diving. Instruction 
in advanced strokes including breast stroke, trudgeon, crawls, speed 
swimming, advanced diving, water stunts and games. 

LIFE SAVING AND WATER SAFETY 

Miss Deason, Miss Finger 
A course open only to students who can present the requisite skill 
in swimming. Designed to qualify students for life guard supervision 
and swimming protection for all ages. The American Red Cross Senior 
Life Saving Certificate is earned upon satisfactory completion of the 
course. 

WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTORS' COURSE Miss Finger 

The American Red Cross Senior Life Saving and Water Safety 
certificate in good standing is a prerequisite for this course. Designed 
for students interested in camp counselorship and water front direc- 
torship in camps, summer recreational programs, community pools 
and for students majoring in physical education. The American Red 
Cross Water Safety Instructor's Certificate is earned upon satisfactory 
completion of the course. 

TENNIS Miss Deason, Miss Finger, Miss Lundquist 

Beginning: Instruction in the fundamentals of tennis — ^the fore- 
hand and backhand drives, the service, rules, court play and etiquette 
of the game. 

Intermediate (Low and High) : Review of fundamentals with 
further instruction in the forehand and backhand drives and the serve. 
Instruction in the volley and lob. Emphasis is placed upon attainment 
of skill in these strokes and consideration of court strategy in both 
singles and doubles. 

Advanced: The course is devoted to the perfection of all strokes 
of the game. Advanced instruction in court strategy and tactics. A de- 
tailed study of the rules. 

TUMBLING Miss Lundquist 

Instruction and practice in tumbling activities including individual 
and group stunts and pyramids. Survey of the history of tumbling, 
analysis of movement involved in tumbling activities, and study of 
methods of conducting a tumbling program. 

VOLLEY BALL Staff 

Fundamental skills and essentials of team play including serve, 
v^oUey, and smash. 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 121 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Physical Education 100. Activities for Freshmen. 

Activities include volley ball, hockey, and softball. Required of 
all freshmen first or second semester. Two hours a week. Credit, 1 hour. 

Staff 

Physical Education 110. Health Instruction for Freshmen. 
This course deals with problems of personal and community hy- 
giene and is designed for the student to develop a broad understanding 
of her obligations to herself and society in matters of health. Required 
first or second semester of all freshmen and transfer students who have 
not met this requirement. Two hours a week. Credit, 1 hour. Staff 

Physical Education 111, 112; 211, 212; 311, 312; 411, 412. Rec- 
reational Activities for Minors in Recreation. 
These activities include basketball, folk dance, games, recreation 
and square dance. Two hours a week. Credit, 1 hour each semester. 

Staff 
Physical Education 131, 132; 231, 232; 331, 332; 431, 432. Gen- 
eral Activities. 

These activities are electives and may include any activity a stu- 
dent desires to take in addition to the eight-hour requirement. Two 
hours a week. Credit, 1 hour each semester. Staff 

Physical Education 140. Techniques in Camping Education. 

The emphasis of this course is placed on the mastery of and ex- 
perience with the specific activities of the camp program such as out- 
door cookery, camp craft, hand craft, nature lore, overnight trips, camp 
music, evening and rainy day programs, programs for special events, 
dramatics, and other related activities. Required of all majors in Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation. May be elected by students in other 
departments, but credit is not applicable to eight-hour requirement in 
physical education. Two hours a week. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Lundquist 
Physical Education 191, 192. Introduction to Health 

and Physical Education. 

An introduction to the philosophy of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation, hygiene, and the following activities: Team sports, dance, ten- 
nis, swimming, shuffleboard, table tennis, and calisthenics. Required 
of all freshmen with a major in Health and Physical Education. Eight 
hours a week. Credit, 3 hours each semester. Staff 

Physical Education 201, 202; 301, 302; 401, 402. General 
Activities for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 
Activities may be elected according to interests, capacity, and physi- 
cal condition of the student. Two hours a week. Credit, 1 hour each 
semester. STAFF 



122 alabama college 

Physical Education 230. Rhythmic Basis. 

Analysis of factors in rh3rthm such as meter, phrasing, form, notes; 
study of folk songs, art songs, court dance forms; study of types of 
instruments, especially percussion instruments; study of children's 
rhythmic activities. This course will meet three hours each week. One 
hour each week will be a laboratory period devoted to participation in, 
observation of, and direction of children's rhythmic activities. Credit, 
2 hours. Miss Foreman 

Physical Education 291, 292. Sports, Games, and Dance. 

Games, folk dance, modern dance, team sports, tennis, and swim- 
ming. Required of all sophomores with a major in Health and Physical 
Education. Prerequisite: Physical Education 191, 192. Six hours a week. 
Credit, 2 hours each semester. Staff 

Physical Education 300. First Aid — Prevention and 

Emergency Care of Injuries. 

Instruction in the various phases of first aid; American Red Cross 
Standard, Advanced and Instructor's First Aid certificates awarded. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the prevention of accidents in the gym- 
nasium, swimming pool, playground, school, home and community and 
on the proper first aid treatment of such emergencies when they occur. 
Required of all majors in Health and Physical Education. May be sub- 
stituted for required activity by non-majors. Two hours a week. {Stand- 
ard course, 1 hour credit; Standard, Advanced and Instructor's course, 
2 hours credit.) Credit, 1 or 2 hours. Staff 

Physical Education 330. Philosophy of Dance. 

A study of the history and development of dance, of the curricu- 
lum in dance, and of methods of teaching and conducting dance activi- 
ties. 'Pwo hours a week. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Foreman 

Physical Education 340. Camp Organization and 

Administration. 

History, purposes, philosophy and trends of camping in education 
and administration of camps according to needs of groups including 
day camps, school camps, private camps and organization camps. Dfs- 
cussion and evaluation of current practices in: selection of camp sites, 
living quarters, facilities for activity program, equipment, length of 
camp season, health, safety and sanitation, utilities, staff, and program 
planning. Emphasis on training, duties and responsibilities of camp 
counselors. Field trips will be made to camps when feasi^e. May be 
elected by any student but credit may not be substituted for a required 
activity course. Credit, 2 hours. Miss McCall 

Physical Education 340.7. Methods of Teaching Health and 
Physical Education in the Elementary School. 
(See Education 340.7.) Two hours a week. Credit, 2 hours. 

Laboratory School Supervisors 



health and physical education 123 

Physical Education 350. Techniques in Socl\l Recreation. 

Designed to present materials and develop skills through practice 
in that phase of the recreation program known as social recreation. 
Members of the class receive actual experience in conducting these 
activities under supervision. Activities for special occasions, holidays 
and home parties are planned and conducted for a variety of age groups 
including the home, community and school. Required of majors in 
Health and Physical Education, and open as an elective to juniors and 
seniors in other departments. Credit not applicable to eight-hour re- 
quirement in physcial education. Two hours a week. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Finger 

Physical Education 350.7. Methods of Teaching Health and 
Physical Education in the Secondary School. 
(See Education 350.7.) Three hours a week. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss McCauley 

Physical Education 352. Health Education. 

Planned to meet both the United States Office of Education recom- 
mendations and the Alabama State Department of Education regula- 
tions regarding health education in the schools. Includes development 
of a point of view toward health education, planning for a healthful 
school environment, for cooperation with parents, administrators, teach- 
ers and the community, and materials for the teachers of the regular 
health instruction periods. Required of all juniors with a major in 
Health and Physical Education. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Finger 

Physical Education 360. Philosophy of Recreation. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to a general over- 
view of the entire field of recreation, showing the relationship of rec- 
reation to education and specifically to art, music, physical education 
and speech. A brief summary of the history, growth, and development 
of the community recreation movement; theory, principles and modern 
trends; organization of the national, state, county and community pro- 
gram; and an outline of the vital problems in the promotion, organi- 
zation, administration and conduct of recreation. 

Required of all minors in recreation. Two hours a week. Credit, 

2 hours. Miss McCall and Members of Staff of 

Departments of Art, Music, and Speech 

Physical Education 361, 3^2. Coaching: Team and 

Individual Sports. 

Lead-up games, skill tests, rules, mastery of play and methods of 
coaching volley ball, soccer, basketball, softball, and badminton, in- 
cluding the organization of the sports for physical education classes, 
and intra-mural athletics; officiating in and conducting the program of 
sports. Selection and care of facilities and equipment. Opportunity for 



124 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

local and national rating in basketball, volley ball, and Softball officiat- 
ing. Required of all juniors with a major in Health and Physical Edu- 
cation. Two hours a week and student teaching in college classes. 
Credit, 2 hours each semester. Miss McCall 

Physical Education 381. Fundamentals of Movement 
AND Kinesiology. 

Discussion of the fundamental movements made by the body in 
carrying on the common activities of life. Theory of joint mechanisms 
and muscular movements. Application of fundamentals to various 
sports. Required of all juniors with a major in Health and Physical 
Education. Prerequisites: Biology 221-222, 211-212; Physical Education 
291-292. Three hours a week. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Lundquist 

Physical Education 391, 392. Sports and Games. 

This course includes tennis, archery, social recreation, swimming, 
tumbling and calisthenics. Required of all juniors with a major in 
Health and Physical Education. Prerequisites: Physical Education 291- 
292. Six hours a week. Credit, 2 hours each semester. Staff 

Physical Education 430, 440. Community Recreation. 

This course is designed to gvf^ senior majors in Health and Physi- 
cal Education and minors in Recreation an opportunity to do field 
work in community recreation with groups in neighboring communi- 
ties. Students meet with committees from the local communities and 
plan and conduct programs based on the needs and interests of the 
group. Credit, 2 hours each semester. Miss McCall 

Physical Education 461, 462. Coaching Tennis and Swimming. 

Tennis: Theory and practice in coaching tennis on various levels, 
including fundamental and advanced techniques. This course includes 
the study of class organization, tournaments, selection and care of equip- 
ment and court construction. 

Swimming: Theory and practice in teaching fundamental strokes 
on various levels. Also coaching in advanced swimming techniques and 
diving. Swimming pool construction, maintenance and operation; or- 
ganization and administration of suitable aquatic programs for camps 
and various school levels. A brief survey of the Red Cross Life Saving 
Tests. Opportunity for observation and student teaching in swimming 
classes. 

Required of seniors with a major in Health and Physical Educa- 
tion. Credit, 1 hour each semester. Miss Finger 

Physical Education 471. Therapeutics. 

A study of the theory of applying corrective exercises to physical 
defects. Practice in organizing and giving physical examinations. Theory 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 125 

and practice of massage. Conduct of classes in individual and restricted 
exercises. Required of seniors with a major in Health and Physical 
Education. Prerequisites: Biology 221-222, 211-212; Physical Educa- 
tion 381 Of concurrent registration in this course. Credit, 5 hours. 

Miss Lundquist 

Physical Education 482. Organization and Administration 

OF Health and Physical Education. 

Analysis of the problems involved in planning for organizing and 
directing the modern health and physical education program in the 
schools, on the playground, and in recreation centers. Emphasis is placed 
upon budget, equipment, care of facilities, finances, selection and super- 
vision of staff, curriculum construction, classification schedules, extra- 
curricular activities, records and reports, grading, tests and costumes. 
An opportunity is given to investigate various typical schools, play- 
grounds and recreation centers. Critical surveys are submitted outlining 
the administrative policies, efficiency and safety of plants visited. Re- 
quired of seniors with a major in Health and Physical Education. (Not 
offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 2 hours. Miss McCall 

Physical Education 491, 492. Sports and Dance. 

This course includes golf, badminton, swimming, tap dance, and 
hockey. Required of seniors with a major in Health and Physical Edu- 
cation. Six hours a week. Credit, 1-2 hours each semester. Staff 



Each student is required to purchase a regulation gymnasium suit 
at the College Supply Store at an approximate cost of $4.00. Each stu- 
dent should bring a pair of white tennis shoes and a heavy sweater or 
short jacket to wear with the gymnasium suit. 

Regulation gymnasium suits for majors in the Department of 
Health, Physical Education and Recreation cost approximately $12.00. 



126 

HISTORY, POLITICAL SCIENCE AND GEOGRAPHY 

Professor Farmer; Associate Professors Eastman, Peter; 
Instructors Griffith, Marshall, Napier. 

Students with a major in this department are required to take the 
following courses: History 101-102, 201-202; Political Science 301-302; 
and six hours elected with the approval of the head of the department. 
Students with a minor in history are required to take History 101-102, 
201-202; Political Science 301-302, or six hours of history substituted 
with the consent of the head of the department. Students with a major 
or a minor in history should elect at least one semester of geography. 

A student may have a composite major or minor in social science 
by completing thirty hours for a major, with at least eighteen hours in 
one field, and twenty-four hours for a minor, with at least twelve hours 
in one field. A minimum of six hours in any subject making up the 
composite major or minor is necessary for certification. 

Students majoring in this department are advised to select their 
minor in conference with the head of the department. 

The department wishes to make its courses as adaptable as possible 
to the needs of the students in this period of world reorganization. To 
that end courses will be offered from time to time which do not ap- 
pear in the regular catalog. During the present year students are ad- 
vised to consider as electives History of Modern Europe (422), History 
of the British Empire and Commonwealth (341), Contemporary His- 
tory (261), South American History (352), or Inter- American Di- 
plomacy (452) which will be valuable in developing an intelligent 
understanding of the present world situation. 

HISTORY 

History 101-102. History of Civilization. 

A study of the development of civilization from prehistoric times 
to the present. Credit, 10 hours. 

Miss Griffith, Miss Marshall, Miss Napier, Miss Peter 

History 111-112. Social and Economic History of the United 

States. 

It seeks to trace the development of the American way of life 
and to create an understanding of the broad aspects of democracy. 
Throughout the course the history of the United States is considered as 
an integral part of world history. Elective for freshmen and sophomores. 
Recommended for those freshmen and sophomores who have had no 
high school course in the history of the United States. Credit, 6 hours. 

Miss Eastman 



HISTORY 127 

History 201, 202. History of the United States. 

A survey of the history of the United States from colonial times 
to the present. Those who desire to offer it as a partial fulfillment of 
the requirements for a major or minor in history will be required to 
take the entire year. Prerequisite: History 101-102. Credit, 3 hours 
each semester. Miss Griffith 

History 261. Contemporary History. 

A survey of contemporary world problems and international rela- 
tions. Not more than one semester may be taken for credit. Credit, 2 
hours. Miss Peter 

History 321. History of England.* 

A survey of history of England with emphasis on the role of 
English culture in world development. This course is devised to suit 
the needs of the English major, as well as for the general student. 
Open to all students in the junior or senior year. Offered in alternate 
years. Credit, 4 hours. Miss Eastman 

History 341. History of the British Empire and Common- 
wealth OF Nations (1837-1944).* 

This course traces the evolution of the modern British Common- 
wealth of Nations from the British Empire of Queen Victoria's day. It 
is designed particularly to acquaint the student with that vast and com- 
plex network of peoples from Australia to the British Isles who play so 
important a part in the present world. Open to all students in the junior 
or senior year. Offered in alternate years. Credit, 4 hours. 

Miss Eastman 
History 371. History of France. 

Beginning with the eighteenth century philosophers and the back- 
ground of the French Revolution, this course traces the development 
of modern French institutions and the role played by France in the 
modern world. Offered alternate years. (Not offered 1948-1949). 
Credit, 3 hours. Miss Eastman 

History 352. A Survey of South American History. 

It is the purpose of this course to acquaint the students with the 
growth and development of the nations of South America. Offered in 
alternate years. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Marshall 

History 362. A History of the Caribbean Nations. 

A course designed to develop the knowledge of students concern- 
ing our neighbors in the Caribbean. Offered in alternate years. (Not 
offered 1948-1949). Credit, 3 hours. Miss Marshall 



*When offered by correspondence or in summer school this course 
carries three hours credit. 



128 alabama college 

History 422. History of Modern Europe (1870-1945). 

Survey course. Students with a major in modern languages are 
advised to take this course. Prerequisite: History 101-102. Open to 
jufiiors and seniors. Credit, 4 hours. Miss Peter 

History 452. Inter- American Diplomacy.* 

A history of the development of relations between the United 
States and the nations of Latin America with special emphasis upon the 
period since 1900. Offered in alternate years. (Not offered 1948-1949). 
Credit, 2 hours. Miss Eastman 

History 472. History of Alabama. 

A survey course. Open to juniors and seniors. Offered in alternate 
years. Credit, 5 hours. Miss Griffith 

History 481. Recent History of the United States. 

A survey of the history of the United States since 1884 with special 
emphasis on the social and economic problems of the period. Open to 
all students in the junior or senior year. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Farmer 

History 482. History of the South. 

A course tracing the economic, social, and political development 
of the South from the colonial times but with emphasis on the period 
from 1830 to 1876, and appraising its influence on the nation. Open 
to students with a major in history in the junior and senior years and 
to other students who have the approval of the department. Offered in 
alternate years. (Not offered 1948-1949). Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Griffith 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 301, 302. Introduction to Political Science. 
A study of the principles of political control, and analysis of 
forms and practices in the United States. Students desiring to take this 
course for elective credit may take either semester. Students who desire 
to offer it as a partial fulfillment of the requirements for a major in 
history may substitute history courses related to their major subject for 
Political Science 301-302 with the consent of the department. Credit, 3 
hours each semester. Miss Farmer 

Political Science 310. Principles of Public Administration. 
A study of administrative structure and organization together with 
a study of methods of control. Prerequisite: Political Science 301 or 
3^1. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Farmer 



♦When offered by correspondence or in summer school this course 
carries three hours credit. 



HISTORY 129 

Political Scilnce 351. State and Local Government. 

A study of state and local government with particular emphasis 
on the government of Alabama. Required of students with a major in 
sociology. Elective for any student of junior or senior standing. Credit, 
3 hours. Miss Farmer 

Political Science 492. International Relations.* 

A course in the mechanics of international organization and poli- 
tics. Recent history, particularly that in which the United States has 
played a part, is used to illustrate the principles studied. Offered al- 
ternate years. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Eastman 

GEOGRAPHY 

Geography 331, 332. Survey of Geography. 

The first semester is devoted to a study of the elements of geog- 
raphy and the second to a study of the regional geography of North 
America. Required of students taking the Bachelor of Arts degree with 
training in elementary education. Elective by semesters for all others. 
Credit, 5 hours each semester. Miss Marshall 

Geography 350. South America. 

A course devoted to a study of the regional geography of South 
America. Both natural divisions and political units are used as a basis 
for discussion. Special emphasis is placed on the economic and social 
development of human activities. Not open to freshmen. Credit, 3 
hours. Miss Marshall 

Geography 352. Conservation. 

A study of Alabama's natural resources and the effects of their 
wise use on social and economic development. Each of the major fields 
of the state's natural resources — forests, soil, water, and minerals — 
will be studied in an attempt to foresee future possibilities of develop- 
ment as well as the present status of these resources. Not open to fresh- 
men. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Marshall 

Geography 460. Economic Geography. 

A study of the influence of geography on the commercial and 
economic development of the important nations of the world. Required 
of secretarial science students. Open to all others. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Marshall 



*When offered by correspondence or in summer school this course 
carries three hours credit. 



130 

THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Ackerley, Director 

Associate Professors Bickham, Eddy, Hadley; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Moore, Smenner; Instructors Dawson, Old, Starr; 
Assistant Supervisors Cotney, Larkin, Nybeck, Robinson, 
Stovall; Assistant Supervisor of Adult Classes Newell. 

The School of Home Economics offers three major curricula which 
prepare a student to enter vocational home economics education, in- 
stitution economics, or retail economics. 

The institution economics curriculum prepares for dietetic train- 
ing in hospitals, recognized by the American Dietetic Association, in 
which the term of training varies from nine months to one year. This 
curriculum also provides training in food administration work in col- 
leges, school lunchrooms, commercial cafeterias, tearooms, and club 
houses. Supervised experience is provided through the college food 
department and the Montevallo public school lunchroom. By careful 
choice of electives and attendance at one summer-school session after 
meeting the requirements of this curriculum, a student may also meet 
the requirements of the vocational home economics education curricu- 
lum. 

The retail economics curriculum offers training for those inter- 
ested in department store opportunities, costume design, interior dec- 
oration, and distributive education. The field of retailing includes work 
in buying and selling merchandise; advertising and display; the placing 
and training of personnel; and work in control and other non-selling 
departments. This curriculum offers courses that giYQ the necessary 
background for this work and also provides supervised experience in 
the leading department stores in Birmingham and Atlanta. Through 
individual conferences, each student is guided in selecting the subjects 
which best fit her needs and her interests so that she is prepared to 
enter the phase of work in which she wishes to participate. 

Majors in art and secretarial science may minor in retail economics 
taking a minimum of eighteen hours in their junior and senior years. 

Students who satisfactorily complete the vocational home econom- 
ics education curriculum will qualify for one or the other of two teach- 
ing certificates, both of which are acceptable for teaching home eco- 
nomics, either vocational or non-vocational, in the secondary schools 
of Alabama. 

For the Class B Vocational Professional Certificate in Home Eco- 
nomics, the applicant in addition to meeting the requirements of the 
curriculum, outlined on page 132, (1) must satisfactorily complete a 



HOME ECONOMICS 131 

minimum of three projects, chosen to meet her own special needs, 
which must be selected, planned, carried out and evaluated under the 
supervision of members of the faculty of the School of Home Eco- 
nomics, and (2) maintain high scholarship in Home Economics 440 
and 490. 

Students who complete the above curriculum but are unable to 
meet the project and scholarship requirements are eligible to apply 
for the Class B Vocational Certificate in Home Economics. 

The holder of either of the certificates described above will also 
qualify for teaching any academic subject in which she has earned a 
minimum of 12 semester hours of credit. 

Other Vocational Opportunities. 

Other positions open to graduates of the several curricula in The 
School of Home Economics include: Home economists in the Agricul- 
tural Extension Service or the Home Administration; teaching as- 
sistants in nursery schools of Alabama; home economists for business 
concerns; home economics journalism or specialists in the field of so- 
cial service. 

Nursery School. 

The Nursery School furnishes college students and parents of the 
nursery school children opportunity for observing the interests and 
responses of little children in their various activities as well as for 
assisting in the nursery school program. 



132 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



First Semester 
Art 150 

English 101 

History 111 

Home Economics 101 

Physical Science 111 

Physical Education 100. 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester 

.. 3 Psychology 150 3 

.. 3 English 102 3 

.. 3 History 112 3 

.. 4 Home Economics 102 4 

— 3 Physical Science 112 3 

.- 1 Physical Education 110 1 

17 17 



SOPHOMORE 



Firsi Semester 

Biology 201 3 

English 201. .._ 3 

Home Economics 250 4 

Physical Science 231. 



Sociology 201 3 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



Second Semester 

Biology 202 _ 3 

English 202 3 

Home Economics 270 4 

Physical Science 232 3 

Sociology 202 3 

Physical Education 202 1 



17 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Art 360 3 

Biology 300 3 

Education 310 3 

Home Economics 320 4 

Sociology 330 3 

Physical Education 301 1 



Second Semester 

Economics 350 3 

Physical Science 340 3 

Education 320 or 

Psychology 300 3 

Home Economics 340 4 

Home Economics 390 3 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 

SENIOR 
First Semester 

Home Economics 440 4 

Home Economics 490 5 

Home Economics 492 3 

Education (Secondary) 5 



17 



17 



Second Semester 

Home Economics 380 2 

Home Economics 450 2 

Home Economics Electives 12 

Physical Education 402 1 

17 



SUGGESTED ELECTIVES — AT LEAST ONE FROM EACH GROUP 

1. Foods 3 hours 4. Clothing 2 hours 

Home Economics 470 Home Economics 362 

Home Economics 372 Home Economics 441 

Home Economics 482 Home Economics 430 

2. Farm Living 2 hours Home Economics 452 

Home Economics 411 Home Economics 462 

Home Economics 412 5. The House 2 hours 

3. Family 2 hours Home Economics 310 

Home Economics 400 Home Economics 410 
Home Economics 402 



HOkE ECONOMICS 



133 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
INSTITUTION ECONOMICS 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

Art 150 

English 101 

History 111.... 

Home Economics 101 

Physical Science 111 

Physical Education 100. 



Second Semester 



Psychology 150 

English 102 

History 112 

Home Economics 102.. 

Physical Science 112 

Physical Education 110. 



. 3 
. 3 
. 3 
. A 

. 3 
, ) 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



Biology 201 3 

English 201... 3 

Home Economics 270 _ 4 

Physical Science 231-_. _ 3 

Sociology 201 3 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Biology 202 3 

English 202 3 

Electives 4 

Physical Science 232 3 

Sociology 202 3 

Physical Education 202 1 



17 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Biology 30O 3 

Economics 350 3 

Education _ 3 

Home Economics 320 4 

Home Economics 381 3 

Physical Education 301 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Physical Science 340.. 

Sociology 330 

Home Economics 380. 
Home Economics 340. 
Home Economics 372. 



3 

3 

3 

4 

3 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 



SENIOR 



First Semester 

Home Economics 450 2 

Home Economics 471 2 

Home Economics 480 1 

Home Economics 482 3 

Electives > 8 

Physical Education 401 1 



Second Semester 

Home Economics 382 3 

Home Economics 440 4 

Home Economics 470 3 

Electives 7 



17 



17 



134 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
RETAIL ECONOMICS 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



Art 111 or 150 3 

English m 3 

Physicar Science 111 -3 

History lll._ 3 

Home Economics 101 4 

Physical Education 100 1 



Second Semester 
Art 112 or Psychology 150. 
English 102 



. 3 

. 3 

Physical Science 112 3 



3 
4 
Physical Education 110 1 



History 112. 

Home Economics 102. 



17 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



Biology 101 or 201 3 

English 201 3 

Physical Science 231 _ 3 

Sociology 201 3 

Psychology 150 or Elective 3 

Elective _ 1 

Physical Education 201 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Biology 102 or 202 3 

English 202 3 

Physical Science 232 3 

Sociology 202 3 

Home Economics 250 or 320 4 

Physical Education 202 1 



17 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Economics 301 3 

Physical Science 340 3 

Art 251 or 231... 2 

*Home Economics 300 2 

Home Economics 360 1 

Home Economics 450 2 

Electives 3 

Physical Education 301 1 



Second Semester 

Economics 302 _ 3 

Science 3 

Psychology 340 2 

Home Economics 362.. 3 

Speech 2 

Electives 3 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 



17 



SENIOR 



First Semester 

Home Economics 431 2 

Home Economics 451 5 

Home Economics 460 2 

Home Economics 461 5 

Art 311 3 



Second Semester 

Home Economics 462.. 2 

Electives 14 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



17 



♦Not required if student takes Home Economics 270. 



HOME ECONOMICS 135 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Home Economics 101. Orientation to College and Intro- 
duction TO Foods. 

Physical and psychological adjustment to college; methods of 
study; budgeting of time and money; student interest and abilities; the 
choice of a vocation. Food selection and preparation as related to nu- 
trition. Credit, 4 hours. 

Miss Ackerley, Miss Eddy, Miss Smenner 

Home Economics 102. Health of the Family and Introduc- 
tion TO Clothing. 

A study of public and preventive health measures as affecting 
family health; prevention of accidents in the home; home care of the 
sick; preservation of wholesome mental attitudes; hygiene of clothing 
and an introduction to clothing construction techniques, pattern al- 
teration, and selection of becoming dress through the designing and 
making of a garment suitable to the student. Credit, 4 hours. 

Miss Ackerley, Miss Smenner 

Home Economics 411. Poultry. 

The breeds of poultry, care, culling, and diseases as would be 
considered on farm life in Alabama. Experience will be given in care 
of baby chicks and operating a brooder. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Ackerley 

Home Economics 412. Landscape Gardening. 

Development of appreciation and pleasure in landscape design. 
Principles of landscape design. A study of natural resources, the land, 
planting materials, the arrangement of planting and the practical ap- 
plication of horticultural principles in gardening. Methods of beautify- 
ing the rural and urban home, with application to local, state, and 
national problems. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Smenner 

Home Economics 460 Problems in Home Economics. 

An individual problem selected by the student with approval of 
the director of the School, is worked out with guidance and supervision 
of an assigned staff member. Hours to be arranged. Credit, 1 to 4 hours. 

Staff 

THE FAMILY 

Home Economics 340. Child Development. 

A study of the development and behavior of young children from 
infancy through the pre-school years. Emphasis is placed on the basic 
needs of the young child for his normal growth and development. 



136 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Home relationship is stressed. Observation and participation in the di- 
rection of nursery school children are included in the course. Credit, 
3 or 4 hours. Miss Bickham 

Home Economics 400. Advanced Child Study. 

Recent research and writings related to the development of young 
children. Practical application of these findings to home and nursery 
school is stressed. Special studies are made of nursery school children. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 340. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Bickham 

Home Economics 402. Problems in Home and Family Life. 

The practical application of the principles of sociology and eco- 
nomics to home and family life, emphasizing health, personality de- 
velopment, standards of living, expenditure of income, housing, house- 
hold management, recreation, good citizenship and social responsibili- 
ties as they influence satisfying family life. Prerequisite: Senior stand- 
ing in home economics. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Smenner 

THE HOUSE AND ITS ADMINISTRATION 
Home Economics 310. House Furnishings. 

Selection and arrangement of furniture and furnishings according 
to need, use, appearance, and income. Prerequisite: Art 150. Credit, 2 
hours. Miss Smenner 

Home Economics 320. Management and Economics of the 

Household. 

Choosing the house, its furniture, and surroundings; wise choice 
and operation of home equipment; problems of management in the 
home. Credit, 4 hours. Miss Smenner 

Home Economics 410. House Planning. 

Study of housing standards; factors influencing the selection of 
family shelter; house designing and planning in relation to family 
needs and income. Prerequisite: Home Economics 320. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Ackerley 
Home Economics 430. Home Management. - 

The home situation as it is influenced by training. Study of con- 
sumption, use of leisure time, importance of work schedules and or- 
ganization of time. Prerequisite: Home Economics 320. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Smenner 
Home Economics 440. House Residence. 

Residence in the home management house, including meal plan- 
ning and preparation; schedule of household organization; and in- 
formal entertaining. Prerequisite: Home Economics 320. Credit, 4 hours. 

Miss Starr 



HOME ECONOMICS 137 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 

Home Economics 250. Clothing Construction and Fitting, 

Fitting and pattern alteration and pattern construction are taught 
through the making of a foundation waist and its development into 
patterns. Wool and rayon construction are taught to develop standards 
in construction skills and costume designing. Prerequisite: Home Eco- 
nomics 101 and 102. Credit, 4 hours. Miss Eddy 

Home Economics 352. Personal Problems in Clothing. 

A non-technical course in clothing open to students not majoring 
in home economics. A brief study of the textile fibers, their physical 
characteristics, dyeing and finishing as they affect selection and care. 
A study of color, proportion and line in relation to the individual. A 
study of personal clothing problems. Construction of two garments. 
No prerequisite. Credit, 2 or 5 hours. Miss Smenner 

Home Economics 360. Laboratory Experience in Selling. 

A course open to juniors who wish to gain experience in a depart- 
ment store. Sixteen Saturdays and vacation days will be spent working 
in a Birmingham department store subject to the approval of the store 
and the School of Home Economics. Credit, 1 hour. Miss Eddy 

Home Economics 362. History of Costume, Textiles, and 

Allied Decorative Arts. 

A survey of the history of costume and textiles with emphasis 
upon the characteristics of each age and the interchange of designs, 
symbols, and techniques. When closely related, ceramics and illuminated 
manuscripts of the period will be included. Required of all home eco- 
nomics retailing students. Prerequisite: Six hours of history. Credit, 2 
or 5 hours. Miss Eddy 

Home Economics 431. Merchandise. 

A continued study of textiles and other merchandise sold in de- 
partment stores. This course will be adapted to the needs and interests 
of the students. Required of all retailing students. Prerequisite: Home 
'Economics 450. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Eddy 

Home Economics 441. Individualized Costuming, 

Selection of good line and color for the individual together with 
style is emphasized. Special attention is given to means by which the 
costume may be made more interesting in detail, through line, color, 
and texture combinations. Prerequisite: Home Economics 230. Credit, 
2 hours. Miss Smenner 

Home Economics 450. Textiles. 

The study of textile fabrics, their use, texture, and durability. This 
includes the study of natural and man-made fibers, yarn construction, 
weave, finish, and dyeing. Required of all home economics and retail 
economics students. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Eddy 



138 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Home Economics 451. Retail Merchandising. 

Study of retailing with special emphasis on department store or- 
ganization and policies, the store and the community, and training for 
retailing. Prerequisite: Senior standing in home economics. Credit, 3 
hours. Miss Eddy 

Home Economics 452. Advanced Clothing Design. 

Construction of a tight-fitted lining as a foundation for modeling 
without a commercial pattern. Development of designs in cotton and 
rayon through the techniques of drafting, flat pattern designing, and 
draping. Prerequisite: Home Economics 250. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Eddy 

Home Economics 461. Supervised Experience in Department 
Stores. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 360 and 431. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Eddy 
Home Economics 462. Textile Economics. 

The study of the economic and social significance of fashion and 
standardization in the textile and clothing industries and how these 
affect the consumer. Required of all retailing students. Prerequisites: 
Home Economics 450 and Economics 350. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Eddy 
FOODS AND NUTRITION 

Home Economics 270. Food Preparation and Service. 

A study of the methods of food preparation and menu planning, 
stressing food selection and nutrition, organization of work; purchase 
and cost of food; and table service. Prerequisites: Home Economics 101 
and Physical Science 111. Credit, 4 hours. Miss Starr 

Home Economics 272. Food and Its Preparation. 

A non-technical course open to students not majoring in home 
economics. A study of standard methods of cookery; individual nutri- 
tion requirements; selection of food in relation to needs and cost; plan- 
ning, preparing and serving simple meals. No prerequisite. Credit, 2 
hours. Miss Starr 

Home Economics 300. Feeding the Family. 

A study of the nutritional needs of individual members of the 
family; planning adequate meals; purchasing food. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Starr 
Home Economics 372. Quantity Cookery. 

This course includes the serving of special meals such as dinners, 
school lunches, teas, parties and banquets, and choice of appropriate 
decoration and entertainment for the various occasions. Emphasis on 
organization and cost of large quantity preparation and service. Prere- 
quisite: Home Economics 270. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Moore 



home economics 139 

Home Economics 380. Nutrition and Dietetics. 

A study of food requirements, and nutritive values of food and 
the choice and use of food for the maintenance and advancement of 
positive health and vitality. Prerequisite: Physical Science 232. Credit,, 
2 or 3 hours. Miss Starr 

Home Economics 381. Institution Administration. 

A study of the organization of administrative work in hospitals,, 
residence halls, cafeterias, and other institutional groups. Institutional 
philosophy, personnel policies, job analysis, records and cost account- 
ing for institutions. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Moore 

Home Economics 382. Advanced Institution Administration. 
A study of physical equipment, time schedules, quantity buying, 
and menu planning for specific institution groups. Includes laboratory 
work in the Laboratory School Cafeteria. Prerequisite: Second semester 
junior standing in institution economics. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Moore 

Home Economics 470. Investigation in Cookery. 

Study of factors affecting standard products, including ingredients, 
proportions, methods, temperatures, utensils, and appliances. Prerequi- 
sites: Senior standing; Home Economics 380; Physical Science 340. 
Credit, 3 hours. Miss Ackerley 

Home Economics 471. Food Economics. 

The study of market conditions and marketing. Food consump- 
tion, markets, credit, price policies, legislation pertaining to consumers 
and markets, the purchasing of staples, canned foods, fresh fruits and 
vegetables, meats and dairy products with reference to quality, cost 
and use. Prerequisite: Economics 350. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Moore 

Home Economics 480. Readings in Nutrition. 

A study of recent nutrition investigations and research. Prerequi- 
sites: Senior standing in home economics; Home Economics 380. Credit, 
1 hour. Miss Moore 

Home Economics 482. Advanced Nutrition and Diet Therapy. 
A study of dietary modifications necessary in certain special and 
abnormal cases. An average of C in home economics is required for 
enrollment in the course. Prerequisites: Home Economics 380; Senior 
standing in home economics. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Moore 



140 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Home Economics 390. Methods of Teaching Home Economics 

IN High Schools. 

A study of the basic philosophy and objectives of home economics, 
its contribution to general education and vocational education; growth 
and development of adolescents with special emphasis on development 
of needs of high school girls and boys, and experience in home eco- 
nomics that can meet these needs; principles of learning applied to 
teaching home economics in high school; personal development of the 
home economics teacher. Includes directed observation in high school. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing in home economics. Credit, 5 hours. 

Miss Hadley 

Home Economics 490. Supervised Observation and Teaching 

IN Vocational Home Economics Classes. 

1. A minimum of 60 lessons, 90 minute periods, in supervised ob- 
servation and teaching is required; including 9 weeks supervised teach- 
ing in a high school home economics class, and directed observation in 
not less than 20 class periods. 2. Supervised home visits. 3. Weekly 
clinic for discussion of teaching problems. 

An average of C in home economics is required to do student 
teaching. Prerequisites: Home Economics 390; Senior standing in home 
economics. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Hadley, Miss Dawson, Miss Old 

Home Economics 492. Vocational Education in Home 

Economics. 

Materials and organization of the home economics curriculum; 
evaluation of student achievement in home economics; and a study of 
the national and state programs for vocational education and their re- 
lation to the home economics program with special emphasis on the 
Alabama Vocational Home Economics Program. Prerequisite: Parallel 
or following Home Economics 490. Credit, 5 hours. Miss Hadley 



141 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Jackson; Associate Professor Braswell. 

MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS 

Students with a major in mathematics may be candidates for either 
the A.B. Liberal Arts, A.B, Secondary, or B.S. degree. For the B.S. 
degree the minor must be in science. For an A.B. degree the minor 
may be selected from other divisions than that of science and mathe- 
matics. The following courses are required for either a major or minor. 
Mathematics 101, 102; 201, 202; 301, 302. For a major, courses 451, 
452 are required in addition to the ones required for a minor. Students 
with either a major or minor, who have not studied solid geometry be- 
fore entering college, are expected to take Mathematics l6l. 

Mathematics 101, 102. College Algebra and Trigonometry. 

Open to students who enter with credit for one year of algebra. 
Required of those with a major or minor in mathematics. Credit, 3 
hours each semester. Miss Braswell, Miss Jackson 

Mathematics l6l. Solid Geometry, 

An elective for students who do not offer entrance credit in solid 
geometry. Offered alternate years. (Not offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 
2 hours. Miss Jackson 

Mathematics 201, 202. Analytic Geometry. 

Coordinate geometry with special emphasis on the conic sections 
and the general equation of the second degree. Required of students 
with a major or a minor in mathematics. Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

Miss Jackson 

Mathematics 221, 222. The Mathematics of Finance. 

A study of the mathematics needed to cope intelligently with 
problems of investment, such as simple and compound interest, annui- 
ties, bonds, sinking funds, life insurance, and other problems of mod- 
ern finance. An ellective for students who have completed six hours of 
college mathematics. Especially recommended for those with a major 
or minor in mathematics. Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

Miss Jackson 

Mathematics 251, 252. Elementary Statistics. 

A first course in statistical methods dealing with such topics as 
measures of central tendency and variability, zero order correlation, re- 
gression equations with two variables only, graphic representations, 
simple work with frequency distributions, use of tables of normal dis- 
tribution in simple problems, and practical applications of all these. 
Credit, 3 hours each semester. Miss Braswell 



142 alabama college 

Mathematics 272. Spherical Trigonometry. 

Trigonometry applied to areas on the surface of a sphere, with 
emphasis on applications to the science of navigation. Offered alternate 
years. (Not offered 1948-1949-) Prerequisite: Mathematics 102. Credit, 
2 hours. Miss Jackson 

Mathematics 301, 302. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

The usual topics included in a first course in calculus are treated, 
such as functions, limits, the derivative, with its applications as the 
slope of the curve, and as the rate of charge of a function, maxima 
and minima, infinitesimals; differentials; the indefinite integral, and 
the definite integral with applications to geometry and physics. Re- 
quired of students with a major or minor in mathematics. Credit, 3 
hours each semester. Miss Braswell 

Mathematics 350.5. Methods of Teaching Mathematics. 
(See Education 350.5.) Credit, 3 hours. Miss Braswell 

Mathematics 352. College Geometry. 

A modern extension of Euclidean geometry, closely related to high 
school geometry, but dealing with new materials. Some of the topics 
studied are: geometric construction, properties of the triangle, theorems 
of Menelaus and Ceva, and harmonic properties of circles. Suitable 
preparation for the teaching of secondary school geometry. (Not of- 
fered 1948-1949.) Credit, 2 or 3 hours. Miss Braswell 

Mathematics 421. Projective Geometry. 

An introductory course in modern synthetic projective geometry. 
An elective for students with a major or minor in mathematics. (Not 
offered 1948-1949.) Credit, 2 hours. Miss Jackson 

Mathematics 451. Theory of Equations. 

The greater part of this course is devoted to the theory of equa- 
tions. Other topics included are: determinants; complex numbers; per- 
mutations; combinations and probability; infinite series. Required of 
students with a major in mathematics. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Jackson 

Mathematics 452. Differential Equations. 

An elementary course dealing with methods of solving ordinary 
differential equations of the first and second orders, with some appli- 
cations to geometry and physics. Required of students with a major in 
mathematics. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Jackson 



143 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Professor LeBaron, Director 

Professor Ziolkowski; Associate Professors Chamberlin, Far- 
RAH, Winer; Assistant Professors Strom, Ordway; Instruc- 
tor Davis; Young, Supervisor in Laboratory School. 

Admission 

The general requirements for admission to the School of Music 
are the same as the requirements for admission to the College. 

Students are accepted conditionally in applied music and are not 
given permanent ranking as freshmen until they have proven to the 
satisfaction of their teacher and the Director that they can progress 
successfully to the various degrees of required advancement. Those 
who have had applied music in high school will be placed where they 
can work to best advantage, but no college credit will be given for 
work done on the secondary level. 

Advanced standing in music from an accredited institution will be 
accepted conditionally at the time of entrance and final credit will be 
extended after the work in residence proves acceptable. 

Degrees 

The courses of the School of Music lead to the Bachelor of Music 
degree. The award of the degree is based not only upon the comple- 
tion of the general theoretical and academic requirements as listed in 
the several curricula but also upon definite requirements in applied 
music and general musicianship. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree, with a major or minor in music, is 
also offered through the regular organization of the College proper. 
(See page 68.) In this curriculum not more than twenty hours in ap- 
plied music may be counted towards the degree. 

Attention is also called to the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Music, as 
outlined on page 80 of this catalog. 

Elective courses in music may be taken by students who are major- 
ing in other fields. Work at any degree of advancement in applied 
music is possible, as are the courses in theory, history, and appreciation. 

The music and academic courses of the Bachelor of Music and 
Bachelor of Arts curricula for the freshman year are similar, so that 
decision as to which curriculum will be followed may be deferred until 
the beginning of the sophomore year. 



144 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Organization of Curricula 

The School of Music curricula offer opportunity for concentration 
upon performance and for teacher training. There is also a major in 
composition. The emphasis upon performance or applied music, as it is 
called, is offered in organ, piano, violin, voice and wind instruments. 
The teacher training program offers election in the following fields: 
piano, violin, voice, elementary school music, secondary school music, 
wind instruments, string instruments, and choral music. 

The curricula leading to the Bachelor of Music Degree are outlined 
on pages 151 to 153 of this catalog. The first two years of each of 
these curricula are the same. This period is used to develop basic mu- 
sicianship and to orient the student in the field of music. 

Final selection of a major must be made at the beginning of the 
junior year. The major may be selected in applied music, if the neces- 
sary degrees of advancement have been demonstrated by passing the 
proper Comprehensive Examination. 

The major may also be selected with emphasis on the teaching of 
piano, violin, voice, band and orchestral instruments, and school music. 
The teaching major requires the passing of Comprehensive Examina- 
tion A as a prerequisite. 

Voice and violin students in the regular course take piano (known 
as secondary piano) at entrance and as much longer as is necessary 
to pass Comprehensive Examination A. 

A Senior Recital is required of the applied music major. This 
recital must show an hour of actual playing time. Evidence of adequate 
ability as a performer must be given through public performance by the 
teaching major. A formally organized program is not required, but it 
is strongly advised. 

A student whose course does not require a second applied music 
subject may elect one. Not more than two applied subjects may be 
studied in any semester. In individual cases when a secondary applied 
music subject is required a substitute may be used with the permis- 
sion of the Director, 

The School of Music is a member of the National Association of 
Schools of Music, which is required of members of the Southern As- 
sociation of Colleges and Secondary Schools granting the degree of 
Bachelor of Music. The curricula are organized in conformity with 
the requirements of the National Association. 

Preparation for Entrance 

For those who expect to major in some field of applied music, 
the desired degree of advancement at entrance is indicated in the fol- 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC l45 

lowing pages under the several applied music headings. The minimum 
requirements in applied music of several of the curricula can be 
achieved during the four-year course by concentrated effort. 

Teachers £reparing students for entrance to the School of Music 
should bear in mind the importance of a thorough grounding in funda- 
mental theory in the formative years. This should take the form of 
"theory-keyboard" relationships, based upon clear, well-ordered think- 
ing habits. The scale system, signatures (including the relative minor), 
cadences in all keys (I IV I V I), modulation to the related keys rec- 
ognized both by ear and analysis are basic. Sight reading should be 
placed upon the same plane as memorizing and as of equal importance. 
Sight reading should be made the basis of an ordered approach to 
the various time signatures, note values, rhythms, accidentals, and keys. 

Entering students show a lack of generalizing in the instruction 
they have had. A thoughtful grasp of principles common to all music 
should be developed to avoid treating each composition as a separate 
unrelated experience. The ideal is the study of music at the piano 
rather than the too early building of an advanced technical agility 
which usually results in an automaton-like performance. 

An analysis of performance is found on page 148 under the heading 
"Factors Valued in Musical Performance." This is offered as a guide. 
The statements should be broken down into language suitable to the 
age level of the pupil. 

Majors 

Composition. The major in composition not only requires the 
completion of course 402 but concentration in the field beyond the 
normal School of Music requirements. A minimum of applied music as 
measured by Comprehensive Examination A is also required. Both 
Counterpoint 351 and 352 are required. 

Organ. The major in organ is not restricted to those who have 
studied the instrument. The class is limited and open only with the 
permission of the instructor. Adequate preparation for beginning or- 
gan study is done on the piano and the necessary advancement is to 
be found in the preparatory work in piano listed below. A year of 
composition, in addition to the required course, is recommended. 

For graduation the candidate in organ should have acquired the 
ability to read moderately difficult anthem accompaniments at sight. 
She should have demonstrated her ability to play a church service 
including a solo accompaniment .She should have laid the foundation 
of transposition, open score reading and improvisation. 

The repertoire should include several of the larger Bach works, 
the Franck Chorales, Piece Heroique; Widor, Symphony No. 5; Guil- 
mant Sonata No. 1; Vierne Symphony No. 1. Compositions of modern 
American and foreign composers should also be included. A Senior 
Recital is required in the soloist's course. 



146 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

The church playing course emphasizes different musical literature 
and stresses service playing. Especial attention is given to the use of 
the Hammond organ in the church service. Music of the Church 401- 
402 is required. 

Piano. The student who intends to major in piano, stressing the 
soloist's approach, should be able at entrance to perform the follow- 
ing items in order to avoid an undue pressure of work during the 
course: Major and minor scales and broken chords, in octave position, 
in all keys, standard etudes, such as Czerny, Op. 299, Book I; Heller, 
Op. 47 and 46; Bach, Little Preludes, corresponding to the difficulty 
of: 

Haydn, Sonata No. II, G major No. 20 (Schirmer) 
Mozart, Sonata C major No. 3, F major No. 13 (Schirmer) 
Beethoven, Variations on Nel cor Piu, Sonata Op. 49, No. I. 
Schubert, Impromptu Op. 142, No. 2 etc. 

The soloist in piano must pass Comprehensive Examination B be- 
fore the beginning of the junior year. The teacher's course requires 
the passing of Comprehensive Exaniination A before the senior year. 

For graduation the candidate majoring as a piano soloist must have 
acquired the principles of tone production and velocity and their ap- 
plication to scales, arpeggii, chords, octaves and double notes. She 
must have a repertory comprising the principal classic, romantic and 
modern compositions which should include such works as: 

Bach, Chromatic Fantasia and fugue, toccatas, organ transcriptions 
by Busoni, Tausig, Liszt, D'Albert. 

Beethoven, later sonatas such as Op. 53, 57, and a concerto. 

Brahms, Rhapsody B minor, Sonata F minor. 

Chopin, ballades, polonaises, fantasie, barcarolle, scherzi, etudes, 
preludes and a concerto. 

Liszt, rhapsodies, Paganini Studies, transcriptions, a concerto. 

Schumann, Sonata G minor, Faschings-schwank, Carneval, Con- 
certo. 

Compositions by standard American and foreign modern composers 
such as MacDowell, Grieg, Rubinstein, Moszkowski, Debussy, 
Ravel, Rachmaninoff and others. 

The requirements for piano as a secondary instrument will be 
found in the appropriate places. 

Violin. At entrance the student should have the ability to per- 
form etudes of the difficulty of the Kreutzer Etudes Nos. 1-32, and 
works of the difficulty of the Viotti Concerto, No. 23, the de Beriot 
concerti, Nos. 7 and 9, and the Tartini G minor sonata. There should 
also be an elementary knowledge of the pianoforte. 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC l47 

The violin major starts the study of piano at entrance and con- 
tinues, at least, until Comprehensive Examination is passed. 

The candidate for graduation should show an adequate grounding 
in scales, arpeggii, bowing and phrasing and the ability to perform 
works of the difficulty of the Mendelssohn E minor concerto, the 
Bruch G minor or Spohr No. 8. 

During the four-year course the student should have had not less 
than two years practical orchestral experience and two years' ensemble. 
She should have studied the viola sufficiently to enable her to play 
viola in ensemble. 

A Senior Recital is required. 

Voice. At entrance the student should be able to sing, on pitch, 
with correct phrasing and musical intelligence, standard songs in good 
English (the simpler classics are recommended). She should also 
demonstrate her ability to read a simple song at sight and a knowl- 
edge of the rudiments of m.usic. Some knowledge of piano is urgently 
recommended. 

The voice major starts the study of piano at entrance and continues, 
at least, until Comprehensive Examination A is passed. The candidate 
for graduation should demonstrate the ability to sing the more diffi- 
cult arias of opera and oratorio in English and in two foreign lang- 
uages, a knowledge of recitative in both the free and measured forms, 
and knowledge of the general song literature. The repetory for im- 
mediate use should consist of at least four operatic arias, four ora- 
torio arias, twenty classic and twenty standard modern songs. The 
candidate should have completed two years of ensemble singing. 

A Senior Recital is required. 

Diction 101 through 302 is required of the major. The credit for 
these courses is counted as part of the hours in applied music. 

School Music. Besides completing the prescribed courses of the 
School Music curriculum, the candidate for a degree must have passed 
Comprehensive Examination A and have demonstrated vocal ability 
of the degree of advancement as follows: Major scales (10th, 11th, 
12th) and arpeggii, tempo moderato; minor scales (10th) and arpeggii, 
tempo, andante. In addition to two simple operatic and oratorio arias, 
songs of the following difficulty: Caldara, Selva amiche; Schubert, 
Gretchen Am Spinnrad; Grieg, The Swan, A Dream; Kocchelin, Si tu 
le veux; MacDowell, Eight Songs, Op. 47. 

Wind Instrument. At entrance the student should have acquired 
the elementary technique of her instrument. The wind instrument 
major starts the study of piano at entrance and continues, at least, un- 
til Comprehensive Examination A is passed. Four years of band or 
orchestral training is required and at least two years in small ensembles. 



148 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Before graduation she should have appeared successfully as soloist 
with band or orchestra in a concerto or concert piece for her instrument. 

Examinations 

Regular semester examinations in both theory and applied music 
are in charge of the respective teachers. Comprehensive examinations 
are required also. These are in charge of the Director, assisted by two 
faculty members. The comprehensive examinations are designed to 
stimulate and measure the coordination of theoretical and applied 
study. The basic technique of the piano which is required in them af- 
fords the means of expression for the desired essential musicianship. 

There are two comprehensive examinations. Examination A is the 
measure of accomplishment in piano in those applied subjects where 
piano is the required secondary instrument and also it is the measure 
where state certification is involved. Examination B is required of the 
piano soloist before the beginning of the junior year. The requirements 
of both examinations are to be had in mimeographed form from the 
Director's office. 

Factors Valued in Musical Performance 

The following analysis of performance is a guide to thinking in 
terms of musical rather than technical language. It might be stated as 
the difference between consciousness of sound as opposed to conscious- 
ness of fingers. Thorough musicianship would use technique as the 
means of presenting the integrated musical elements or factors. 

Quality of Tone. Tone suited to character of composition, varied, 
and produced fluently even under technical and emotional stress. 

Rhythm. Adequate basic pulsation suited to character of composi- 
tion and to the means of performance. Accelerandos, ritards, and ruba- 
tos consistent in variation. 

Phrasing. Figures, phrases, and larger elements of structure made 
sufficiently vivid to support consistently the character of the composi- 
tion. 

Dynamics. Climaxes of phrase, section, and whole composition 
with contrasts and gradation suited to the character of the composition. 

Artistic Unity. Coordination of all elements inspired by con- 
ception of the composition as unity of emotional purpose. 

Diction (Vocal). Unrestricted projection of song in auditorium 
of moderate size so that the content is fully grasped by the auditor, 
even in passages of technical and emotional intricacy. 

Intonation (Vocal, String, and Wind). No deviations of a dis- 
turbing nature. 

Above — Reynolds Hall, erected in 1851. 

Below — Hanson Hall, a student residence hall, was erected in 1929- 



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THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 149 

SCHEDULE OF WORK 

The normal amount of work each semester for a student is seven- 
teen hours, including one hour of physical education. No student will 
be allowed to take more than eighteen hours of work unless she has 
an average of B for the previous semester, the consent of the College 
Physician, the Director of the School of Music, and the Dean of the 
College. The minimum requirements for four years are 128 semester 
hours plus eight hours of physical education. 

The study of more than two applied music subjects in one semes- 
ter is not permitted. 

RECITAL CLASS 

Attendance at the recital class is required of all students with a 
major in music. This class is scheduled on Tuesday at 3:30. It is the re- 
sponsibility of each student to keep this hour free from conflicts. 

Participation in the Recital Class a stated number of times is re- 
quired of all majors each semester. 

ALABAMA STATE CERTIFICATION FOR TEACHERS 

For the past fifteen years, at least, the Alabama College Placement 
Bureau has not been able to meet the demands for certified teachers 
of music. It should be noted that teachers in this field are full mem- 
bers of a school staff and often are able to earn more than those not 
in a special field. 

A student completing a Bachelor of Music curriculum including 
twenty-one hours of education is eligible for the Class B Special Pro- 
fessional Certificate. The twenty-one hours in education must include 
Education 490. In addition items I and II below require Education 300 
(3 hours). Items III through VIII require Education 310. The remain- 
ing sixteen hours may be selected from the music education listed be- 
low or from courses in the education department. The education re- 
quirements for the School Music major are prescribed in the curriculum. 

The education requirements for certification should be planned in 
consultation with the Director of the School of Music before the be- 
ginning of the junior year. 



Above — Main Dormitory, a student residence hall, comprises three 
distinct units, and contains parlors, reception halls, and din- 
ing rooms. 

Below — Bloch Hall, opened in 1915, contains classrooms, depart- 
mental offices and laboratories. 



150 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

I Piano 

Piano Normal 401.6 2 hours 

Piano four years 

Comprehensive Examination A prerequisite 

II School Music, Elementary 

Education 340.6 3 hours 

Education 440.6 2 hours 

Comprehensive Examination A and a prescribed 
voice examination prerequisite. 

III School Music, Secondary 

Education 350.6 3 hours 

Education 450.6 2 hours 

Conducting 400.6 1 or 2 hours 

IV Violin 

String Pedagogy 311.6, 312.6 4 hours 

Directed Teaching of String Instruments 470. 6.... 1 or 2 hours 
Violin four years 

V Voice 

Vocal Normal 401.6, 402.6 4 hours 

Voice four years 

VI String Instruments 

String Pedagogy 311.6, 312.6 4 hours 

Wind and String Pedagogy 401.6, 402.6 4 hours 

Directed Teaching of String Instruments 470.6.... 1 or 2 hours 
Conducting 400.6 1 or 2 hours 

VII Wind Instruments 

Wind Pedagogy 301.6, 302.6 4 hours 

Wind and String Pedagogy 401.6, 402.6 4 hours 

Directed Teaching of Wind Instruments 460.6.... 1 or 2 hours 
Conducting 400.6 1 or 2 hours 

VIII Choral Music 

Directed Teaching of Choral Music 480.6 1 or 2 hours 

Conducting 400.6 1 or 2 hours 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



151 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC CURRICULA 

All curricula for the Bachelor of Music degree have the first two 
years in common: 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 

Applied Music 101 3 

Harmony and Ear 

Training 101 3 

Kej^board Harmony 111 2 

English 101 3 

History 101 _. 5 

Physical Education 100 1 



Second Semester 

Applied Music 102 „. 3 

Harmony and Ear 

Training 102 3 

Keyboard Harmony 112 2 

English 102 3 

History 102 5 

Physical Education 110 1 



17 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 

Applied Music 201 

Harmony 201 

Analysis 251 

Sight Singing and Ear 

Training 211 

English 201 

Psychology 211 

Sociology 201 



Second Semester 



Applied Music 202 3 

Harmony 202 2 

Analysis 252 2 

Sight Singing and Ear 

Training 212 1 

EngHsh 202 3 

Psychology 212 2 

Sociology 202 3 



Physical Education 201 1 Physical Education 202 1 



17 



17 



COMPOSITION, INSTRUMENTAL, VOICE (Soloist) 



JUNIOR 



First Seinester 

Applied Music 301 6 

Sight Singing and Ear 

Training 311 1 

History of Music 301 3 

Counterpoint 351 2 or 3 

Electives 3 or 4 

Physical Education 301 1 



Second Semester 

Applied Music 302 6 

Sight Singing and Ear 

Training 312 1 

History of Music 302 3 

Counterpoint 352 2 or 3 

Electives 3 or 4 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 



17 



152 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



SENIOR 



First Semester 

Applied Music 401 6 

Composition 301 3 

Ensemble 401 1 

Appreciation 451 3 

Electives 3 

Physical Education 401 1 



17 



Second Semester 

Applied Music 402 6 

Composition 302 3 

Ensemble 402 1 

Appreciation 452 3 

Electives 3 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



It is suggested that Composition 301-302 be taken in the junior year 
and 401, 402 in the senior year. 



COMPOSITION, ORGAN, PIANO, VIOLIN, VOICE (Teachers) 

The electives of the junior and senior years may be devoted to addi- 
tional hours in teacher training courses, or to music electives or to 
academic electives. Not more than six hours of the latter may be 
taken. 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Applied Music 301 3 

Sight Singing and Ear 

Training 311 1 

History of Music 301 3 

Counterpoint 351 3 

Teacher Training 4 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 301 1 



17 



Second Semester 

Applied Music 302 3 

Sight Singing and Ear 

Training 312 1 

History of Music 302 3 

Education 310 _ 3 

Teacher Training 4 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 302 1 



17 



SENIOR 



First Semester 

Applied Music 401 3 

Composition 301 3 

Ensemble 401 1 

Teacher Training 4 

Appreciation 451 ..-. 3 

Education 490 2 

Physical Education 401 1 



Second Semester 

Applied Music 402 3 

Composition 302 3 

Ensemble 402 1 

Teacher Training 4 

Appreciation 452 » 3 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



17 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



153 



SCHOOL MUSIC 



JUNIOR 



First Semester 

Applied Music 301 3 

History of Music 301 3 

Conducting 400.6 2 

Wind Pedagogy 301.6 2 

String Pedagogy 311.6 2 

Sight Singing and Ear 

Training 311 1 

Education 310 3 

Physical Education 301 1 



Second Semester 

Applied Music 312 2 

History of Music 302 3 

Education 350.6 3 

Wind Pedagogy 302.6 2 

String Pedagogy 312.6 2 

Sight Singing and Ear 

Training 312 1 

Education 300 3 

Physical Education 302... 1 



17 



SENIOR 



First Semester 

Applied Music 401 3 

Education 340.6 3 

Ed,ucation 440.6 2 

Piano Normal 401.6 2 

Survey of Theory 401 2 

Teacher Training 2 

Education 490 2 

Physical Education 401 1 



Second Semester 

Applied Music 402 

Appreciation 452 

Education 450.6 

Piano Normal 402.6 

Survey of Theory 402 



17 



Teacher Training 2 

Electives 2 

Physical Education 402 1 



17 



COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 



Piano 

Mrs. Chamberlin 
Mrs. Davis 
Miss Strom 
Mr. Ziolkowski 



Voice Violh? 

Miss Farrah Miss Ordway 

Miss Winer 
Wind Instruments 

Mr. Young (Laboratory School) 



17 



Organ 
Mr. LeBaron 



Applied Music 101, 102; 201, 202; 301, 302; 401, 402. Organ, 

Piano, Violin, Voice, Wind Instruments, 

String Instruments. 

Two half -hour lessons a week. Number of credit hours are deter- 
mined by the number of hours of daily practice, up to three. Credit, 3 
to 6 hours each semester. 

Applied Music 111, 112; 211, 212; 311, 312; 411, 412. Organ, 

Piano, Violin, Voice, Wind Instruments, 

String Instruments. 

Two half -hour lessons a week. Two hours daily practice. Credit^ 
2 hours each semester. 



154 alabama college 

Applied Music 121, 122; 221, 222; 321, 322; 421, 422. Organ, 

Piano, Violin, Voice, Wind Instruments, 

String Instruments. 

Two half -hour lessons a week. One hour daily practice. Credit, 1 
hour each semester. 

Music 121, 122; 221, 222; ETC. Choral Study; Glee Club. 

The rudiments of voice production, breathing and diction; study 
of glees, madrigals, anthems, motets, and larger compositions for con- 
certed voices. Three hours a week. Credit, 1 hour each semester. 

Mr. LeBaron 
Music 121, 122, etc. Orchestra, Band. 

This course is offered in two forms. Work for beginners, especial- 
ly freshmen and sophomores who are not music majors, and for more 
experienced students in connection with the College Orchestra and 
Band. Two hours a week. Credit, 1 hour each semester. 

Miss Ordway, Mr. Young 
Music 401, 402. Ensemble. 

Application of rhythmic and structural knowledge to group per- 
formance. Accompaniment. Sight reading. Two hours each week. 
Credit, 1 hour each semester. Mr. LeBaron 

Music 451, 452. Vocal Ensemble. 

A course for solo and teaching voice majors to acquaint them with 
vocal technique (tonal effects, phrasing, interpretation) of the music 
literature for small vocal ensembles with performing experience. Credit, 
1 or 2 hours each semester. Miss Winer 

COURSES IN THEORETICAL MUSIC 

Music 101-102. Harmony and Ear Training. 

An effort to correlate the eye, ear, and mind as they deal with the 
fundamental musical concepts; the writing and hearing of the integra- 
tion of rhythm and phrase in simple tonality; analysis. Three hours a 
week. Credit, 6 hours. Mr. LeBaron 

Music ill, 112. Keyboard Harmony. 

Scales, Cadences and Modulations. In part, the basic theoretical 
and skill approach to the technical examinations. Three hours a week. 
Credit, 2 hours each semester. Miss Strom 

Music 201-202. Harmony. 

Melody writing and harmonization, tonality and modulation, al- 
tered and augmented chords; figured bass, foreign tones and the be- 
ginnings of the contrapuntal approach to part writing. Three hours a 
week. Credit, 4 hours. Miss Strom 



the school of music 155 

Music 211-212. Sight Singing and Ear Training. 

Coordinated ear training with Harmony 201-202, melodic sight 
singing and dictation, rhythmic study. Two hours a week. Credit, 2 
hours. Miss Ordway 

Music 251, 252. Analysis, Structural and Harmonic. 

Homophonic and contrapuntal forms from the structural point of 
view. Study of classical and modern styles of harmonic writing. Three 
hours a week. Credit, 2 hours each semester. Mrs. Davis 

Music 311-312. Sight Singing and Ear Training. 

Continuation of 211-212. Harmonic dictation. Two hours a week. 
Credit, 2 hours. Miss Ordway 

Music 301-302. Composition. 

Instrumental and vocal composition in the smaller forms. Solo and 
ensemble settings and arrangements. Orchestration. Two hours a week. 
Credit, 5 to 10 hours. Miss Strom 

Music 351, 352. Counterpoint. 

Contrapuntal study based upon examples of the classic vocal and 
instrumental periods. The madrigal, invention, canon and fugue. Two 
hours a week. Credit, 2 or 5 hours each semester. Miss Strom 

Music 401, 402. Composition. 

This course offers opportunity for those properly qualified to 
complete the major in composition. Fugue in five sections, songs or 
compositions in smaller forms for the major instrument, a sonata form 
for one or more instruments, and scoring of a composition (not neces- 
sarily original) for full orchestra. Prerequisite: Composition 301- 
302. Tv/o hours a week. Credit, 3 to 3 hours each semester. 

Miss Strom 
Music 401, 402. Survey of Theory. 

Coordination of past theoretical study, drill in relating it to per- 
formance; its relation to music instruction. Constructive writing. Credit, 
2 hours each semester. Miss Strom 

Music 451. Advanced Counterpoint. 

Continuation of the preceding course in Counterpoint. One hour 
a week. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Strom 

Music 452. Advanced Harmony. 

Contemporary writing as approached by Hull in Modern Harmony. 
One hour a week. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Storm 

HISTORY OF MUSIC 

Music 301, 302. History of Music. 

Survey of the evolution of music as an art with consideration of 
trends as influenced by significant forces in social, religious, and econo- 



156 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

mic fields and especially in development of the other arts. Credit, 3 
hours each semester. Mrs. Chamberlin 

Note-. One hour of History and Appreciation of Music is given as 
a part of the course in History of Civilization (see History 101-102). 
This is an orientation course correlating musical growth with parallel 
developments in the principal fields of human endeavor. Acquaintance 
with music of all periods is made through recordings, and experience in 
recognition of instruments and music forms is acquired in a weekly 
listening laboratory. One hour each week. The work carries a credit 
value of one hour each semester and is recorded as History. 

COURSES IN TEACHER TRAINING 

Music 301.6, 302.6. Wind Pedagogy. 

A study of the basic principles of band instruments and their tech- 
niques. Practice and development of performing technique upon the key 
instruments. The formation of a beginning band, selection and pur- 
chase of instruments, rehearsal, the marching band, and the drum 
major. Three hours a week. Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

Mr. Young 

Music 311, 312. School Music for the Grade Teacher. 

A course to enable elementary teachers to meet the needs of their 
groups in music. Experience in singing and reading music, general ap- 
preciation on the adult level as well as that of the child. A study of 
materials and procedures. Three hours a week. Credit, 2 hours each 
semester. Miss Farrah 

Music 311.6, 312.6. String Pedagogy. 

A study of the basic principles of string instruments and their 
teachniques. Practice and development of playing techniques. The for- 
mation of an orchestra, selection and purchase of instruments, technique 
of rehearsal. Three hours a week. Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

Miss Ordway 
Music 340.6. The Teaching of Elementary School Music. 
(See Education 340.6.) Three hours a week. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Farrah 
Music 350.6. Secondary School Music. 

(See Education 350.6.) Three hours a week. Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. LeBaron 
Music 400.6. Conducting. 

The basic patterns of rhythmic indication, principles of interpreta- 
tion and their indication. Practice in choral and orchestral conducting. 
At least two years participation in one of the musical organizations is 
required. Two hours a week. Credit, 1 or 2 hours. Mr. LeBaron 

Music 401.6, 402.6. Wind and String Pedagogy. 

A continuation of the previous year's work in connection with the 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 157 

College Orchestra and Band. Two hours a week and two rehearsals. 
Credit, 2 hours each semester. Miss Ordway, Mr. Young 

Music 401.6, 402.6. Vocal Normal. 

Analysis of vocal problems with demonstration. Practice. Prere- 
quisites: Diction 201-202, 301-302. Two hours a week. Credit, 2 hours 
each semester. Miss Winer 

Music 401.6, 402.6. Piano Normal. 

Practice in the instruction of the child beginner at the piano. Pre- 
requisite: Examination A. Three hours a week. Credit, 2 hours each 
semester. Mrs. Chamberlin 

Music 440.6. Directed Teaching of School Music in the 
Elementary Grades. 
(See Education 440.6.) Five hours a week. Credit, 2 hours. 

Music 450.6. Directed Teaching of School Music in the 
Secondary School. 
(See Education 450.6.) Five hours a week. Credit, 2 hours. 

Music 460.6. Directed Teaching of Wind Instruments. 

This course may be substituted for 450.6 when taken for two hours 
credit or the substitution may be made in conjunction with 470.6, both 
courses being taken for one hour credit each. Three or five hours a 
week. Credit, 1 or 2 hours. Mr. Young 

Music 470.6. Directed Teaching of String Instruments. 

This course may be substituted for 450.6. (See 460.6.) Three or 
five hours a week. Credit, 1 or 2 hours. Miss Ordway 

Music 480.6. Directed Teaching of Choral Music. 

This course may be substituted for 450.6. (See 460.6.) Three or 
five hours a week. Credit, 1 or 2 hours. Mr. Young 

LANGUAGE FOR THE VOCALIST 

Music 101, 102. Diction. 

A study of the vocalist's problems in English and other languages. 
This course is required of all beginning voice students taking voice for 
more than one hour of credit. It is designed to save time in the private 
lesson. Two hours a week. Credit, 1 hour each semester. 

Miss Winer 
Music 201-202. Diction. 

A course in Italian and German diction which includes the essen- 
tials in practical grammar and phonetics. Illustrations and reading ex- 
ercises are taken from standard songs and arias thus building quickly at 
practical vocabulary for immediate use in singing. Two hours a week. 
Credit, 4 hours. Miss Winer 



158 alabama college 

Music 301-302. Diction. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of voice majors in in- 
terpretation of French repertoire. Its content includes the essentials of 
grammar and practical phonetics since singer's French differs from the 
spoken language. Illustrative material is drawn from French opera and 
songs. Two hours a week. Credit, 4 hours. Miss Winer 

APPRECIATION COURSES 

Music 351, 352. Apprecl\tion. 

Constructive listening for the non-music student. An effort to sub- 
tract from the mystery of music and establish a basis for musical en- 
joyment through changed attitude and a rational approach to the sub- 
ject; a study of types and styles of composition; building of an histori- 
cal perspective. Two hours a week and listening periods. Credit, 1, 2, or 
3 hours each semester. Mr. LeBaron 

Music 451, 452. Appreciation, Aesthetics. 

A course for music majors. Three hours a week. Credit, 1, 2, or 5 
hours each semester. Mrs. Davis 

Music 401, 402. Music of the Church. 

A study of the problems of worship and worship music. Two 
hours a week. Credit, 2 hours each semester. Mr. LeBaron 

MUSIC FOR THE RECREATION MINOR 

Music 341-342. Recreational Music, 

This course is for majors in departments other than music who 
are working out a recreation minor. Rudiments of music theory, in- 
cluding keys, rhythm and tonality; the sensory approach to the above 
theory; sight reading and ear training; application of this generalized 
theory to songs; the principles of group psychology and its direction; 
conducting and accompaniment; materials for community singing and 
its interpretation. Three hours a week. Credit, 6 hours. 

Mr. LeBaron 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES IN MUSIC 

The following courses are offered by correspondence through our 
Home Study Service, and information may be obtained concerning 
this work by writing the Director of the Home Study Service, Ala- 
bama College, Montevallo: 

Music 101-102. Harmony. 
Music 201-202. Harmony. 
Music 301-302. Composition. 
Music 351, 352. Counterpoint. 
Music 401, 402. Composition. * 



159 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Kennerly; Associate Professor Decker; Assistant 
Professor Hood; Instructor Kennerly. 

Physical Science 101-102. Survey in the Physical Sciences. 

A survey in the fields of Astronomy, Physics, Chemistry and Geol- 
ogy. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory-demonstration period a 
week. Credit, 6 hours. Mr. Hood 

Physical Science 111-112. General Chemistry. 

A study of the common elements and their related compounds, 
along with fundamental chemical laws and theories. Two lectures and 
one two-hour laboratory period a week. Credit, 6 hours. 

Miss Decker, Mrs. Kennerly 

Physical Science 121-122. General Chemistry. 

A study of the common elements and their related compounds, 
along with the fundamental chemical laws and theories. A more ex- 
tensive course than Physical Science 111-112. Required of all students 
majoring in the Biological or Physical Sciences. Two lectures and two 
two-hour laboratory periods a week. Credit, 8 hours. 

Mr. Kennerly, Mrs. Kennerly 

Physical Science 201-202. Organic Chemistry. 

A course for students with a major in Physical Science. A study is 
made of the carbon compounds beginning with the hydrocarbons of the 
paraffin series and continuing with a study of aliphatic and aromatic 
compounds. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Credit, 8 hours. Miss Decker 

Physical Science 210. Qualitative Analysis. 

A course in qualitative analysis intended to familiarize the student 
with the separation and identification of the common metals and acid 
radicals. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Kennerly 

Physical Science 231-232. Organic-Physiological Chemistry. 
Organic Chemistry is given during the first semester, followed in 
the second semester by a course in Physiological Chemistry. The carbo- 
hydrates, fats and proteins are studied as they are related to the changes 
that take place within the body. The action of various body secretions 
upon these foods is given careful consideration. Two lectures and one 
two-hour laboratory period a week. Credit, 6 hours. Miss Decker 

Physical Science 301-302. General Physics. 

A study of the laws of machines, gravitation, electricity, etc. Two 
lectures and one; two-hour laboratory period a week. Credit, 6 hours. 

Mr. Kennerly 



160 alabama college 

Physical Science 321-322. Quantitative Analysis. 

A study of the principles of quantitative procedures as employed 
by the analyst. Gravimetric and Volumetric methods are studied with 
particular emphasis being given to the solution of problems of a quan- 
titative nature. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Credit, 6 hours. Mr. Kennerly 

Physical Science 331-332. Physiological Chemistry. 

The various food principles are studied with relation to the chemi- 
cal action of the body's secretions upon them. Metabolic processes along 
with blood, urine and tissues are studied. Two lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory period a week. Credit, 6 hours. Miss Decker 

Physical Science 340. Physics. 

A course in general physics with emphasis on the practical appli- 
cation of physics to home appliances. Designed for students with a 
major in Home Economics. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period a week. Credit, 3 hours. Mrs. Kennerly 

Physical Science 410. Physical Chemistry. 

A study of the nature of gases, liquids, solids and solutions and 
the laws which govern their behavior. The physical constants of these 
substances are determined in the laboratory. Thermo-chemistry and 
electro-chemistry are discussed briefly. Two lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory period a week. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Hood 

Physical Science 420. Clinical Chemistry. 

The analysis of blood, urine and other secretions is given consid- 
eration, qualitative and quantitative tests being made upon these. One 
lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Decker 

Physical Science 431, 432. Quantitative Analysis. 

Continuation of Physical Science 321 and 322 but more advanced 
methods of analysis are considered. One lecture and two two-hour lab- 
oratory periods a week. Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

Mr. Kennerly 
Physical Science 440. Astronomy. 

A descriptive course in astronomy, intended to familiarize the stu- 
dent with various aspects of the universe and solar system. For students 
who have not had Physical Science 101-102 or its equivalent. Two lec- 
tures a week. Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Hood 

Physical Science 450. Industrial Chemistry. 

A study of the various industrial processes as related to chemistry. 
Two lectures a week. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Decker 



161 
PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY 

Professors Napier, Steckel, Vickery; Assistant Professor 
Black; Instructor Weary. 

MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS 

Students with a major in Psychology are required to take Psychol- 
ogy 201-202, or its equivalent, and Psychology 301-302. A minimum 
of twenty-four hours in Psychology is required for a major and the 
additional fourteen hours not prescribed above will depend upon the 
type of work for which the student is preparing. 

Students with a minor in this department will take the prescribed 
courses mentioned above and choose the remainder of the eighteen 
hours under the guidance of some member of the staff. 

Psychology 200. Educational Psychology. 

This course includes a study of the general process of growth, 
problems of health, interests and incentives, social psychology of child- 
hood and early adolescence, problems of emotional stress and disci- 
pline, the individual child, the development of intellectual efficiency 
and learning. For students preparing to teach in the elementary grades. 
Prerequisite: General Psychology. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Steckel, Miss Weary 

Psychology 201-202. General Psychology. 

Innate and acquired factors in behavior; motivation of behavior; 
individual differences and their measurements; problems of learning; 
personality adjustments. Scientific method illustrated with simple ex- 
periments. Credit, 6 hours. Miss Vickery, Miss Weary 

Psychology 211-212. General Psychology. 

General characteristics of behavior, heredity and environment as 
factors in individual development, motivation, motor and sensory func- 
tions, emotions, neural organization of behavior, statistical methods, in- 
telligent behavior, conditions of learning, social behavior and person- 
ality. Credit, 4 hours. Mrs. Black, Miss Steckel, Miss Weary 

Psychology 250. Child Psychology. 

This course applies the general psychological principles to the 
growth and development of the young child. Emphasis is placed on the 
following topics: the significance of infancy and early childhood; origins 
of child behavior; development of physical and motor capacities; langu- 
age development; the development of mental functions; emotional be- 
havior; motivation during childhood; social development of young 
children; prediction, guidance and control of child behavior. Observa- 



162 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

tion in nursery school, kindergarten or elementary school is required. 
Prerequisite: General Psychology. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Steckel 
Psychology 300. Educational Psychology. 

This course includes a study of physical growth and development 
of the adolescent school child; emotions, personal adjustment; intelli- 
gence, and the processes of growth and development through learning. 
Special reports on selected readings and experiments, and the develop- 
ment of related projects are required. Prerequisite: General Psychology. 
Credit, 3 hours. Miss Steckel, Miss Weary 

Psychology 301, 302. Experimental Psychology. 

A study of laboratory technique and method with emphasis on the 
sensory processes and motor phenomena, for the first semester; and on 
problems of memory, learning, perception, and thought during the sec- 
ond semester. The principles of elementary statistics necessary to the 
compilation and interpretation of data are included in this course. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 201-202. Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

Miss Vickery, Miss Weary 

Psychology 340. Applied Psychology. 

The psychology of dealing with people. An understanding of the 
individual's fundamental wants. A consideration of the factors upon 
which the quality of human adjustments depend. Psychology as applied 
to the professions of teaching, law, medicine, art; the parent-child re- 
lationship, the employer-employee relationship. Prerequisite: General 
Psychology. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Weary 

Psychology 350. Adolescent Psychology. 

Genetic background, survey of child development with emphasis 
on the pre-adolescent and adolescent periods, problems of social and 
educational adjustments, vocational guidance and mental hygiene as re- 
lated to the adolescent boy and girl. Recommended for students who 
expect to become leaders of girl scouts or campfire girls, to conduct 
social activities in high school, to act as adviser to high school girls, or 
to teach in high school. Prerequisite: General Psychology. Credit, 5 
hours. Miss Vickery 

Psychology 360. General Testing. 

A survey of tests in common use, including performance tests, 
group tests of achievement, intelligence, personality, vocational interests; 
mechanical and motor tests, measurement of attitudes, interpretation of 
norms and scores. Credit, 2 hours. Mrs. Black, Miss Vickery 

Psychology 370. Intelligence Testing. 

Demonstration and practice in using the Revised Stanford-Binet 
tests; general clinical practices; interpretation of scores; handling of 



PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY l63 

cases; form of report of clinical examination and recommendations. 
Prerequisite: General Psychology. Credit, 2 hours. 

Mrs. Black, Miss Vickery 

Psychology 410. Abnormal Psychology. 

Types of personality and their relation to abnormalities; amnesias; 
sleep; dreams; hypnosis, hallucinations; multiple personalities; neuroses 
and psychoses; principles of mental hygiene. Prerequisite: General 
Psychology. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Vickery 

Psychology 420. Social Psychology. 

A psychological study of the individual in the social situation. Em- 
phasis is upon the development of attitudes, group thinking, sources 
of conflict, effects of competition and cooperation, analysis and evalua- 
tion of propaganda techniques and other forces which affect indi- 
viduals in groups. The group discussion method is used. Prerequisite: 
General Psychology. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Steckel, Miss Weary 
Psychology 430. Mental Hygiene. 

Problems of mental health with emphasis on the period of child- 
hood and adolescence, conditioning and inhibition, sleep, fatigue and 
psycho-neuroses, symptoms and treatment of social maladjustments. 
Prerequisite: General Psychology. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Steckel, Miss Vickery, Miss Weary 

Psychology 460. Statistics in the Social Sciences. 

Obtaining statistical data, tabulations, frequency distributions; ap- 
plication of statistical measures of central tendency, variability, re- 
liability, and correlation. Compilation and interpretation of norms. 
Forms of standard scores, comparisons of data, graphs. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Vickery 
Psychology 470. Psychology of Personality. 

This course includes a study of the psychological organization of 
adult personality with emphasis upon individuality rather than upon 
generalized human nature. A study of the organic basis of personality, 
factors involved in the development of an integrated personality, and 
personality variables and their measurement are included in the course. 
Credit, 2 hours. Miss Steckel, Miss Weary, Mr. Napier 

PHILOSOPHY 
Philosophy 440. Introduction to Philosophy. 

Meaning and scope of philosophy; its functions, problems, theories, 
and methods. Some reading from original sources. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Vickery 
Philosophy 450. Modern Philosophy. 

Brief review of the development of philosophy to the time of 
Bruno; study of the systems of outstanding modern philosophies with 
emphasis on the English and German schools. Reading from original 
sources. Credit, 5 hours. Miss Vickery 



164 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 
Professor McCoy 

Religious Education 100. The Life and Teachings of Jesus. 

This course offers opportunity for a fairly intensive study of the 
life of Jesus using the Gospel records as a basis, with a survey of the 
historical background in the political and religious world of the period. 
Open to all students. Credit, 2 hours. Mrs. McCoy 

Religious Education 151. Origin and Nature of the Bible. 

This course includes a study of the sources from which the Bible 
has been developed, the processes involved in the transmission of it to 
the present, the significance of revisions. Open to all students. Credit, 

1 hour. Mrs. McCoy 

Religious Education 152. Comparative Religions. 

A comparative course including some eight or ten major religions 
of the world, studied from the point of view of their founders, their 
contributions, and in comparison to the Christian religion. Open to all 
students. Credit, 1 hour. Mrs. McCoy 

Religious Education 201. The Minor Prophets. 

Each prophecy is studied in its historical setting and from the point 
of view of its teaching with special reference to its message for the 
twentieth century. Open to all students. Credit, 2 hours. 

Mrs. McCoy 

Religious Education 202. The Acts and the Pauline Epistles. 
This course embraces a historical study of the early Church based 
on the Acts of the Apostles, and a study of Paul's letters which are 
essentially an interpretation and practical application of early Christiani- 
ty. Open to all students. Credit, 2 hours. Mrs. McCoy 

Religious Education 251. The Religion of the Old Testament. 
A survey of the political, social, and religious history of the Hebrew 
people, based chiefly on the Old Testament. The course is designed ta 
enable the students to gain a knowledge of the Biblical material, to 
develop an adequate technique in handling literary sources for historical 
purposes, and to discover the possible contribution of the religion of 
Israel to her own philosophy of religion. Open to all students. Credit, 

2 hours. Mrs. McCoy 

Religious Education 252. The Arts and Religion. 

A survey course on the history of Christian religious expression, 
and its message, in the Arts. Religion in Sculpture, Painting, Archi- 
tecture, Music and Poetry is studied in primitive forms, in classical 
types, and in the life of today. During the semester outside speakers 



RELIGIOUS EDUCATION l65 

will address the class, and Alabama College faculty members will be 
invited as discussion leaders. Open to juniors and seniors. Credit, 2 
hours. Mrs. McCoy 

Religious Education 332. Modern Christl\n Missions. 

A history of the Missionary Movement of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries, designed to give advanced students a knowledge of 
the position of the Christian Church in non-Christian lands, to ac- 
quaint them with its problems and present-day situations. Both sides 
of mooted questions are presented. Open to all students. Credit, 1 hour. 

Mrs. McCoy 

Religious Education 340. Christian Ethics in the 

Life of Today. 

This course is concerned with timeless standards of right and 
wrong as grounded in the moral law of Supreme Reality. These laws as 
principles are studied and applied to the problems of individuals and 
of society in a changing world. Open to all students. Credit, 2 hours. 

Mrs. McCoy 

Religious Education 401. Literary Types of the Old and 

New Testaments. 

A study of the Bible as living literature. A course in which the 
study is primarily a surv^ey of such types as law, history, short story, 
poetry, biography, personal and general letters, and the apocalyptic 
literature. Open to juniors and seniors. Credit, 2 hours. Mrs. McCoy 

Religious Education 402. Current Religious Trends. 

A reading course covering a fairly large collection of new books 
in the field of religion. Where definite new trends are manifest a few 
authorities of the past are consulted for comparison. The chief em- 
phasis is on books of very recent issue. Offered primarily for juniors 
and seniors. Credit, 2 hours. Mrs. McCoy 



166 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Brownfield; Associate Professor McGee; 
Instructor Elgin. 

Secretarial Science 201-202. Elementary Shorthand. 

The principles of Gregg shorthand in accordance with the prin- 
ciples of the functional method. Credit, 6 hours. Miss Brownfield 

Secretarial Science 211, 212. Elementary Typewriting. 

A practical course in typewriting. Accuracy, speed, and arrange- 
ment. Credit, 2 hours each semester. Miss Elgin 

Secretaiual Science 301-302. Advanced Shorthand. 

Rapid dictation and transcription. Each student is required to do 
some work in a college office. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 201- 
202 or the equivalent. Credit, 6 hours. Miss Brownfield 

Secretarial Science 311. Advanced Typewriting. 

A continuation of Secretarial Science 211, 212. Emphasis on de- 
velopment of speed and arrangement of material. Prerequisite: Secre- 
tarial Science 211, 212 or the equivalent. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Elgin 

Secretarial Science 320. Elementary Prinqples of 

Accounting. 

An elective course in beginning accounting for students not major- 
ing in Secretarial Science. Credit, 3 hours. Miss McGee 

Secretarial Science 321-322. Elementary Prinqples of 
Accounting. 
A beginning course in accounting. Credit, 6 hours. Miss McGee 

Secretarial Science 330. Machine Operation. 

The operation of machines used in the modern business office. 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 212. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Elgin, Miss McGee 

Secretarial Science 331, 332. Occupational Analysis. 

A study of techniques for determining the experience, abilities, 
training, and interests needed by persons who are to fit into various 
occupations. Credit, 3 hours each semester. Miss McGee 

Secretarial Science 350.10. Methods of Teaching 

Secretarial Subjects. 

Required of students preparing to teach secretarial work in the 
high school. (See Education 350.10.) Credit, 3 hours. Miss Elgin 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 167 

Secretarial Science 400. Business Organization. 

Types of business; internal structure and functions. The object of 
the course is to give a working knowledge of the business world. Pre- 
requisite: Senior standing or the consent of the instructor. Credit, 3 
hours. Miss McGee 

Secretarial Science 410. Advertising. 

The psychology underlying the preparation of advertisements; 
application of theory to current practices and student projects in writ- 
ing advertisements. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of the in- 
structor. Credit, 2 hours. Miss McGee 

Secretaioal Science 420. Insurance. 

A study of both life and property insurance; bases of insurance, 
types of policies, uses, and operation of the business. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing or consent of the instructor. (Not offered 1948-1949.) 
Credit, 2 hours. Miss McGee 

Secretarial Science 430. Money and Banking. 

A course to acquaint the student with elementary monetary and 
banking principles and enable her to understand the functions of the 
various banking institutions. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of 
the instructor. Credit, 3 hours. Miss McGee 

Secretarial Science 440. Salesmanship. 

A minute examination of the successful salesman and his methods; 
a study of the psychology employed by the salesman, and individual 
sales projects to develop student initiative and poise. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing or consent of the instructor. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss McGee 
Secretarial Science 450. Office Procedure. 

A study of the varied activities carried on in an office, including 
general office management. Special emphasis is placed upon filing. 
Prerequisite: Ability to use the typewriter. Credit, 2 or S hours. 

Miss Elgin 
Secretarial Science 460. Advanced Accounting. 

A continuation course in accounting theory. Includes an intensive 
study of such special problems as depreciation, branch house account- 
ing, consolidated statements, and accounting for insolvent concerns. 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 321-322. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Elgin 
Secretarial Science 470. Business Writing. 

Psychology of business writing. Examination and analysis of actual 
business letters and student preparation of application, sales, credit, and 
other types of letters; original investigations and business reports. Pre- 
requisite: Sophomore English, Credit, 3 hours. Miss McGee 

Secretarial Science 480. Business Law. 

The law underlying business transactions. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Elgin 



168 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Douglas; Assistant Professor Whatley; 
Instructors Cowden, Flynn, Forsythe, Niven. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR 

A minor in this department may be taken in general sociology, in 
the field of social work, or in economics. 

A student choosing a minor in general sociology should take the 
following : 

Sociology 231, 232 or 201, 202 6 hours 

Sociology 330, 341, or 342 3 hours 

Sociology 400, 410, or 411 3 hours 

Electives in general Sociology 6 hours 

A student choosing a minor in the field of social work should 
take the following: 

Sociology 231, 232 or 201, 202 6 hours 

Social Work 351, 352 6 hours 

Social Work 361, 362 4 hours 

Electives 4 hours 

A student choosing a minor in the field of economics should take 
the following: 

Economics 301-2 6 hours 

Economics 360 3 hours 

Economics 370 3 hours 

Economics 380 3 hours 

Economics 410 or 420 3 hours 

Sociology 101, 102. Introduction to Social Living. 

A course designed to provide an acquaintance with the funda- 
mental concepts of social living and with the organizations and pro- 
gram of selected social agencies of which every social worker in the 
state should be familiar. Credit, 1 hour each semester. Mr. Douglas 

Sociology 201, 202. Contemporary Civilization. 

A study of the civilization of the world today with special empha- 
sis upon our own countr)'-, state and community. This study is made 
under the following headings: contemporary forms of expression such 
as art, m.usic, philosophy and religion as well as the symbolism of so- 
cial movements; contemporary scientific advances; contemporary social 
institutions; and social problems and social change. Required of sopho- 
mores in most of the curricula. Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

Mr. Douglas, Mr. Flynn, Mr. Forsythe 



sociology 169 

Sociology 231, 232. Introductory Sociology. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental 
principles of group behavior and social intercourse. A study is made of 
the relation of the individual to the group and of the influence of each 
upon the behavior of the other. Also problems of social interaction and 
change are analyzed so that the student may acquire an understanding 
of the principles involved that she may make use of them in her every- 
day associations. Open to any student of sophomore rank. Credit, 3 
hours each semester. Mr. Douglas 

Sociology 330. The Family. 

A brief sketch of the history of the family; individual relations 
within the family group; traits fundamental to satisfying relations; the 
direction of individual development through the maintenance of in- 
teresting and challenging relations within the family. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 201 or equivalent. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Douglas 

Sociology 341. Criminology. 

A study of causative factors involved in socially approved and 
anti-social behavior, of the philosophies of punishment, and of trends 
in modern thought concerning treatment of offenders. The emphasis is 
mainly on crime in the United States. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Forsythe 

Sociology 342. Southern Regional Sociology. 

Treatment of Urban and Rural aspects of the present-day South 
and their interad;ions. This course will particularly stress the impact of 
industrialism on the south, economically and socially. Prerequisite: So- 
ciology 201, 202 or consent of instructor. Credit, 3 hours. 

Mr. Forsythe 
Sociology 400. History of Soclal Thought. 

An examination of the ideas of outstanding social thinkers from 
Plato to John Dewey studied against the background of their lives and 
the times in which they lived; an evaluation of their influence upon 
contemporary social theory. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Flynn 

Sociology 410. Personnel Administration. 

The general organization and function of personnel work in gov- 
ernment, industry and education. Special emphasis is placed upon per- 
sonnel work in federal and state governments. (Not offered 1948- 
1949.) Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Douglas 

Sociology 411. Socl\l Trends. 

A survey of trends in population, employment and labor organi- 
zations. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Flynn 

SOCIAL WORK 

Social Work 351. Introduction to Social Work. 

A survey of the field of social work, philosophy and practice, with 
emphasis on the processes of case v/ork, group work, and community 
organization. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Niven 



170 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

SocL\L Work 352. Problems of Socl\l Work. 

A study involving problems in social work during this post-war 
era as affected by legislation, community resources, interpretation and 
research. Prerequisite: Social Work 531. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Niven 
Socml Work 361. Community Resources. 

An introductory course to acquaint the student with agencies of 
the community. Emphasis is placed on coordinating all of these re- 
sources dealing with existing social problems. Credit, 2 hours. 

Mrs. Whatley 

Socl\l Work 362. Introduction to Case and Field Work. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the skills and 
techniques of social case work with emphasis on interviewing, case re- 
porting, and the composition of case records. Driver's license is re- 
quired. Credit, 2 hours. Mrs. Whatley 

Social Work 421-422. Social Case Work. 

A discussion of the methods of social case work. Selected case 
records are examined and utilized as material for study and discussion. 
Credit, 6 hours. Mrs. Whatley 

Social Work 461. Public Welfare. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with all public welfare 
programs from the federal-state-local levels, with primary emphasis 
upon public assistance as practiced in Alabama. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Niven 
SocL\L Work 462. Child and Family Welfare. 

A course dealing with special needs of children which involve 
community and agency responsibility for protection, care, and service; 
and the problems of individuals as they affect the family unit. Pre- 
requisite: Social Work 461. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Niven 

Social Work 470. Field Work. 

A special work unit is maintained by Alabama College in coopera- 
tion with the Shelby County Department of Public Welfare. Students 
work under supervision on cases involving case work problems. Ex- 
perience is provided in an intensive study of the individual, family, 
and community problems. Driver's license is required. Credit, 2 hours 
each semester. Miss Cowden, Miss Niven, Mrs. Whatley 

ECONOMICS 

Economics 301-302. The Development of Modern Economic 

Principles and Problems. 

A course outlined to fit the needs of students who wish to major 
or minor in the social sciences. Emphasis is placed on undertanding 
basic economic problems. Particular emphasis is placed around the im- 



SOCIOLOGY 171 

pact of the machine age upon American economic life, industrial and 
agrarian trends, the disruption to world trade by tariff or quota poli- 
cies and the increased participation of government in the distribution 
process. Credit, 6 hours. Mr. Flynn 

Economics 320. Economic Development of the United States. 
A study tracing the economic development of the United States 
from a simple, largely self sufficient, agrarian society to a dynamic, in- 
dustrial, exchange society. Special emphasis is placed upon the economic 
effect of the frontier and the machine revolution upon American eco- 
nomic institutions and life. A non-technical course open to all students 
with consent of instructor. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Flynn 

Economics 350. General Principles of Economics. 

A course designed to assist laymen in the study of economic prin- 
ciples that are of value to citizens as applied in everyday living. Par- 
ticular emphasis is placed on the principles of production and distribu- 
tion. For Home Economics and Secretarial Science Majors. Credit, 3 
hours. Mr. Flynn 

Economics 360. Economics of Socl\l Planning. 

An advanced course examining the work of various commercial, 
industrial and governmental planning groups. Special emphasis is 
placed on post-war planning in the Southeast. Prerequisite: Economics 
301-302 or consent of instructor. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Flynn 

Economics 370. Labor Problems. 

A brief background treatment of the European Labor Movement 
with the major emphasis centering upon a survey of the American La- 
bor scene including wages, unemployment, labor legislation, union or- 
ganizations, agencies of industrial peace. The labor problems of the 
South receive particular attention. Prerequisite: Economics 301-2 or 
consent of instructor. Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Flynn 

Economics 380. Economics of Consumption. 

A study of the problems that confront the modern consumer and 
of the various personal and social techniques that will help solve these 
problems. Special problems of the post-war era will be emphasized dur- 
ing 1948-49. Prerequisites: Economics 301-302 or consent of instructor. 
Credit, 3 hours. Mr. Flynn 



172 



SPEECH 



Professors Gould, Trumbauer; Assistant Professor Compton; 

Assistant Professor and Radio Director Wilson; 

Instructor Parrish. 

Speech 110. Foundations of Speech. 

A beginning course in the fundamentals of speech. Devoted to a 
study of and drills in phonetics, diction, and voice development. Open 
to all students. Required of speech majors. Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Compton 
Speech 120. Public Speaking. 

Emphasizes speech composition and platform techniques for the 
public-speaking situation. Open to all students. Required of speech 
majors. Credit, 5 hours. Miss Compton 

Speech 130. Diction. 

This course is designed to g\^^ training in enunciation, articula- 
tion, and pronunciation. Credit, 1 hour. Staff 

Speech 141-142. Introductory Principles of Speech. 

Designed to further the basic training of the college student in 
use of the mother tongue. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Parrish, Miss Wilson, Miss Compton 

Speech l6l, 162. Clinical Corrective Speech. 

Designed to gvjQ students having speech disorders special training 
in developing standards of speech on a clinical basis. Credit, 1 or 2 
hours each semester. Miss Compton 

Speech 200. Make-Up. 

Practical laboratory work and demonstration of straight and charac- 
ter make-up for the theatre. Credit, 1 hour. Miss Gould 

Speech 210. Advanced Principles of Speech. 

Designed for the particular needs of those with a major in other 
departments who wish to develop qualities of leadership. Training in 
organizing material and thinking, plus attractive and effective presen- 
tation of ideas to others. Three credit hours may be earned by doing 
extra work in the field of debate. Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 

Miss Compton 
Speech 212. Acting. 

Pantomime and elementary technique of acting. Correlation of 
class work with practical technical work in plays. Required of Speech 
Majors. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 220. Principles and Development of the Drama. 

Speech majors may substitute this course for English 202. Credit, 
3 hours. Mr, Trumbauer 



SPEECH 173 

Speech 230. Debate. 

Theory and practice of argumentation and debate. Phrasing the 
proposition, analyzing, outlining, reasoning, evidence, principles of 
persuasion, and discussional method. Required of Speech Majors. 
Credit, 2 hours. Miss Compton 

Speech 240. Phonetics. 

Credit, 2 hours. Miss Compton 

Speech 250. Interpretation. 

A study of the technique involved in the expression of thought 
vocally. Designed for non-majors. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 300. Advanced Theatre Make-Up. 

Credit, 1 or 2 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 301, 302. Advanced Interpretation. 

Interpretation of prose and poetry. Prerequisite: Speech 230 or 
equivalent. Credit, 1 or 2 hours each semester. Miss Gould 

Speech 310. Parliamentary Law. 

Parliamentary drill and procedure. Credit, 1 hour. 

Miss Compton 
Speech 311. Advanced Acting. 

Not open to freshmen. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 330. Stage Lighting. 

(a) The purpose of light on the stage; elementary electricity; sur- 
vey of equipment; procedure of lighting the play. Credit, 1 hour, 

(b) Problems in style of lighting plays. Credit, 2 hours. 

Speech 340. Principles of Speech for Teachers in 

Elementary Grades. 

Personal speech training for the teacher, and methods of improv- 
ing and developing the speech of the grade school pupil. Class lectures, 
collateral readings, and talks and readings by members of the class. 
Special attention to methods of correcting defective speech in children. 
Recommended for students taking the elementary curriculum. English 
credit allowed in elementary curriculum. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 350.9. Methods of Teaching Speech. 
(See Education 350.9.) Credit, 3 hours. 

Miss Gould, Miss Compton 
Speech 351. Story Telling. 

The technique and art of telling stories with practical application 
in story hours. Required of Speech Majors. Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 

Miss Gould 



174 alabama college 

Speech 360. Voice and Diction. 

The principles underlying expressive vocal speech and the pro- 
cedure to acquire basic habits. Correct speech sounds and manner of 
production. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 370. Pageantry. 

A study of the art of pageantry, its organization and production. 
Credit, 2 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 371-372. Speech Rehabilitation. 

A study of the nature and causes of defective speech with diagnos- 
tic techniques and methods of remedial procedure. Each student is re- 
quired to do 18 hours of practical clinical work under supervision. Re- 
quired of speech majors. Credit, 4 hours. Miss Compton 

Speech 380. Stagecraft. 

The functions of stage setting; procedure in mounting a play; 
lighting, scene construction; practical application. Required of speech 
majors. Credit, 2 hours. Mr. Trumbauer 

Speech 382. Auditorium. 

A course designed to meet the needs of the auditorium teacher. 
Study of the way schools use the hour; helps, suggestions, and bibli- 
ography for practical application. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 390. Reading and Interpretation. 

Principles and practice in the reading aloud of literature. Analysis 
of the selection for meaning and mood, with training in the skills of 
expressing the thought, through voice, inflection, emphasis and modu- 
lation. Particularly designed to meet the needs of English teachers. 
Credit, 3 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 400, 410. Clinical Practice. 

Clinical training in the techniques of correcting defective speech. 

Prerequisite: Speech 571-372. A maximum of 2 hours allowed. Credit, 
1 or 2 hours each semester. Miss Compton 

Speech 411, 412. Acting Performance. 

Not open to freshmen. Credit, 1 or 2 hours each semester. 

Miss Gould 
Speech 420. Choral Speaking. 

Methods, techniques, procedures, treatment of materials, and aids 
to develop a director. Credit, 1 or 2 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 430. Speech for High School Teachers. 

A course designed especially to meet the needs of all high school 
teachers. Special emphasis given to the relation of speech to various 
teaching fields. Elective for candidates for A.B. Secondary degree, ex- 
cept Speech Majors. Credit, 1 hour. 

Miss Gould, Miss Compton 



SPEECH 175 

Speech 440. Oral English and Reading Problems in the 

Elementary Grades. 

Consideration of methods, materials, and techniques of teaching 
reading, solving reading problems, and handling remedial work. At- 
tention is given to the improvement of the teacher's voice and diction. 
Considerable time is spent in a discussion of Oral English and reading 
problems arising out of the teacher's personal experiences in the class 
room. Junior or Senior English credit granted. (Offered by extension 
only.) Credit, 3 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 450. Play Production. 

The problems of selecting, casting, acting, staging plays with some 
practical opportunities for experiment. Designed for non-speech majors; 
recreation minor. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Gould 

Speech 470. Play Directing. 

Applying principles of acting from the production side. Directing 
of at least one play with constructive criticism on the production. Re- 
quired of speech majors. Credit, 2 hours. 

Miss Gould, Mr. Trumbauer 

Speech 121, 122; 221, 222; 321, 322; 421, 422. Individual In- 
struction. 

A course designed for personal development and platform reading. 
Speech majors are required to take a minimum of two years in indi- 
vidual instruction. One thirty-minute lesson a week. Credit, 1 or 2 
hours each semester. (See Speech Fees.) Miss Gould 

Speech 131, 132; 231, 232; 331, 332; 431, 432. Interpretation. 
Classwork which can substitute for individual lessons when ad- 
visable. Credit, 1 hour each semester. (See Speech Fees.) Miss Gould 

RADIO 

Speech 320. Radio Survey Course. 

A general background course covering information regarding types 
of programs, policies and procedures, station and network requirements, 
control and regulations of broadcasting, listener demands, etc. Credit, 
2 hours. Miss Wilson 

Speech 361, 362; 461, 462. Radio Participation. 

Registration by permission of instructor. Credit, 1 hour each semes- 
ter. Miss Wilson 

Speech 460. Writing for Radio. 

Detailed study of specific program types; practical training in the 
preparation of scripts dealing with the student's special field of inter- 
est such as music, home economics, sociology, English, etc. Permission 
of instructor required for registration. Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 

Miss Wilson 



176 alabama college 

Speech 480. Radio Production. 

Training in program building, evaluation and interpretation of 
scripts; analyzing characters; auditioning and casting plays; selection 
and use of music and sound effects; timing; handling of rehearsals, 
etc. Prerequisite: Speech 320. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Wilson 

Speech 481. Teaching by Radio. 

The writing and presentation of educational scripts in the field 
and level of the student's special interest. Of value to prospective 
teachers and broadcasters. Credit, 2 hours. Miss Wilson 

Speech 482. Radio in Education. 

A survey of educational programs already existing, printed study 
helps, recording, public address and other equipment. Credit, 1 hour. 

Miss Wilson 

Speech 490. Radio Workshop. 

Continuation of Speech 480. Credit, 3 hours. Miss Wilson 

Speech 492. Broadcasting Problems. 

An advanced course for those desiring more training and exper- 
ience in the field of radio. Registration by permission of instructor. 
Credit, 2 or 3 hours. Miss Wilson 

Speech Clinic. The Department of Speech maintains a clinic for 
the training of students of the College with speech disorders, such as 
stuttering, lisping, cleft palate problems, voice problems, foreign ac- 
cent, articulatory inaccuracies, ^tc Voice recordings are made and in- 
dividual corrective programs set up. Teachers in all departments are 
urged to advise students with defective speech to avail themselves of 
the services of the clinic. 

The clinic is also available to any person in the State with defec- 
tive speech. Write to the Head of the Speech Department for an ap- 
pointment. 

Recitals, Group Experience. Each student in Speech appears in 
recital, thus making practical use of the class and individual instruc- 
tion in methods of pleasing and holding an audience, and also gain- 
ing confidence for later public appearances. In addition to the general 
recitals, juniors givQ a joint spring recital, and each senior appears in 
an individual, full evening program. Group experience is provided by 
the Speech Chorus, membership in which requires a good voice and in- 
terpretative ability. Students interested in the theatre may participate 
in the Play Workshop, where original plays, skits and unpublished 
material are presented. The College Theatre offers talented students 
the experience of practical application of theory, technique and prac- 
tice in speech. 

If interested in Recreation as a minor, see the curriculum set up 
for this field. 



177 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1948 
M. L. ORR, Ph.D., Director 

First Term June 14-July 23 

Second Term July 26-August 27 

COURSES OFFERED 



ill 



Work will be offered in approved regular college courses leading 
toward a degree, and for the issuance, continuance and reinstatement 
of teachers* certificates. 

Special courses will be given in home economics, physical educa- 
tion, music, secretarial science, art, sociology, social work, and speech. 

SUMMER PROGRAM AND WORKSHOP FOR TEACHERS 

The College will again conduct a Summer Program and Work- 
shop. This work will center in: 

The Demonstration High School. 

The Demonstration Elementary School. 

Six semester hours of college credit in education may be earned in 
this program. 

RESOURCE-USE WORKSHOP 

The College will again conduct a Workshop in resource-use. 



For detailed information as to Summer School arrangements, in- 
cluding courses of study and expense, a copy of the Summer School 
Bulletin should be requested of the Director. 



178 

PART FOUR 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1947-1948 

The numeral following the name indicates the number of years a student 
has attended College, i. e., 4, Fourth Year; 3, Third Year; 2, Second Year; 1, 
First Year; S, Special; Ir., Irregular; P. G.. Post-Graduate. 

Abercrombie, Mary Snow, 1 4306 Harmon St., Birmingham 

Adams, Jean, 3 688 E. Pace's Ferry Rd., Atlanta, Ga. 

Addington, Carolyn Norene, 1 2131 East Lake Blvd., Tarrant 

Albreast, Clara Evelyn, 4 Route 1, Castleberry 

Albreast, Elizabeth, 2 Route 1, Castleberry 

Albright, Sarah Elizabeth, 4 Route 1, Montevallo 

Albritton, Bettye L., 1 Camden 

Alexander, Jean Marie, 4 1532 Alabama Ave., Birmingham 

Alexander, Mary Louise, 4 251 Grant St., Decatur 

Alexander, Myra Patricia, 1 500 S. 83rd Place, Birmingham 

Allen, Mary Ervin, 1 Route 1, Gallion 

Allums, Dorothy Jean, 1 Route 1, Dora 

Anderson, Thelma Virginia, 3 Chatom 

Andrews, Barbara Leigh, 3 Route 1, Box 179, College Park, Ga. 

Apperson, Barbara Chloe, 1 929 S. 6th, Mayfield, Ky. 

Armbrester, Mattie Eleanor, 2 Renfroe 

Armstrong, Mary Ruth, 2 Calera 

Arnold, Catherine, 1 Seneca, S. C. 

Ashcraft, Maxine, 4 Kennedy 

Atkins, Lue Ella Jane, 1 2300-28th St., Fairview, Birmingham 

Awbrey, Virginia Doris, 3 Route 1, Leesburg 

Bagley, Charlotte Jeanette, 2 625 Keith Ave., Anniston 

Baker, Betty Jo, 4 Calera 

Baker, Billie Frances, 2 Route 1, Harpersville 

Baker, Carolyn Estelle, 3 2193 N. Broad St., Selma 

Baker, Dorothy, 4 Route 4, Eufaula 

Baker, Eugenia Mai, 1 Route 1, Box 295, Huntsville 

Baker, Ida Margaret, 1 Saf f ord 

Baker, Myrtle, 2 Verbena 

Baker, Sue Barbara, 2 1818 6th Ave., S. Irondale, Birmingham 

Baker, Willie Joyce, 3 720 S. 81st Place, Birmingham 

Baldwin, Eugene Francis, 1 Montevallo 

Ballard, Janina, 1 Detroit 

Bankester, Ruth Marion, 1 Robertsdale 

Barbaree, Amy Lois, 4 1806 Carter Hill Rd., Montgomery 

Barf ield, Mary Joyce, 1 Route 2, Opelika 

Barganier, Addie Laurie, 1 , 311 Ida Ave., Opp 

Barker, Millie, 2 Marion 

Barnes, Annette LaMerle, 3 Butler 

Barnes, Elizabeth Hortense, 2 Route 1, Shorterville 

Barnes, Rose Marie, 1 1330 St. Stephens Rd., Mobile 

Barnett, Jo Ann, 2 610 East Street, S., Talladega 

Barr, Catherine Elizabeth, 4 824 Kirkwood Ave., Anniston 

Barret, Sarah Lucile, 4 Box 494, Decatur 

Barret, Virginia Hogan, 2 Box 494, Decatur 

Barrett, Dorothy Lee, 3 Route 2, Evergreen 

Barton, Elizabeth Ellen, 1 906 S. 26th St., Birmingham 

Battles, Dovie Mae, 1 Spring Garden 

Baughn, Mary Madeleine, 2 Route 1, Graham 

Baumgartner, Dorothy Ann, 1 Montevallo 

Beaird, Margaret Christine, 2 210 Broome St., LaGrange, Ga. 

Beasley, Mary Twynette, 3 Andalusia 

Beaulieu, Francis Rodolphe, 2 116 N. Main St., Barre, Vt. 

Beck, Carmen, 4 Avenida 32 No. 19-12 Bogota, Colombia, S. A. 

Bedford, Audrey Virginia, 3 Gordo 

Benef ield, Virginia Lee, 1 414 E. Roberts, Bemiston, Talladega 

Bentley, Villa Pearl, 3 Route 2, Columbiana 

Benton, Mellanie Carroll, 3 Blue Springs 

Berry, Mary Frances, 2 625 Maple St., Fairfield 

Bertagnolli, Kathleen Pearl, 2 Daphne 

Bishop, Ruth Orlean, 1 727 Selma Ave., Selma 

Black, Winifred Lane, 1 Montevallo 

Blackburn, Zuline Capps, 4 Montevallo 

Blair, Betty Ruth, 2 212 Fifth Ave., Piedmont 

Blizzard, Martha Jean, 1 512 Sixth Ave., W. Decatur 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 179 

Blue, Jacqueline Rosamond, 4 911 Dauphin St., Mobile 

Blue, Peggy Harp, 4 Elba 

Blutstein, Caroline, 3 Concourse Plaza Hotel, New York, N. Y 

Bobo, LUlian Jean, 4 401 Flint St., Mobile 

Bolding, Ramona Jean, 1 Maplesville 

Bolton, Reginal Carl, 1 Route 1, Siluria 

Boman, Betty Grace, 2 Centre Rd., Gadsden 

Bonds, Eleanor Mae, 1 2213 Walnut Ave., Anniston 

Bone, Mable Anne, 1 2203 George St., Columbus, Ga. 

Bosdell, Betty Jane, 3 301 Pine Hill Dr.. Mobile 

Boswell, Ruth, 1 Route 2. Verbena 

Brandenburg, Ruth, 1 1801 Ward's Court, Mobile 

Brantley, Emily Juliette, 2 Excel 

Brantley, Hattie Lou, 1 Evergreen 

Brantley, Vonceil Elder, 3 Maxwell Field 

Breland, Dottie Lilian, 3 1809 LaSalle St., Mobile 

Brewer, Alice Elizabeth, 2 Madison 

Bria, Rosina, 1 Box 332, Cullman 

Bridges, Catherine, Ir Montevallo 

Brooks, Virginia Lee, 3 Route 1, Letohatchie 

Brown, Anita, 1 Flomaton 

Brown, Annette, 1 Flomaton 

Brown, Eleanor Ruth, 1 491 Prospect Ave., West Hartford, Conn. 

Brown, Sara Hallie, 1 Route 2, Jasper 

Brown, Tula Ann, 2 3631 Fourth Ave., S., Birmingham 

Browning, Dorothy Ruth, 1 1306 Leighton Ave., Anniston 

Brownlee, Sara Beth, 2 3910 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ga. 

Bruce, Norma Jane, 3 1045 Green Springs Ave., Birmingham 

Bryant, Beverly Elaine, 3 1328 17th Place, S. W„ Birmingham 

Bullock, Mary Adelia, 4 1742 Wellington Rd., Birmingham 

Bumpers, Betty Gene, 2 Cortelyou 

Bumpers, Marion, 4 Grove Hill 

Burgess, Sarah Ralphna, 1 210 Tuskeena St., Wetumpka 

Burns, Mary Elizabeth, 2 Route 2, Box 115, Mobile 

Burton, Cleo, 1 Canoe 

Butler, Alice Corinne, 2 New Hope 

Butler, Elizabeth Lucile, 2 106 Stewart Ave., Greenville 

Butler, Jessie Mae, 3 Columbiana 

Buttram, Wales Kay, 2 Route 4, Piedmont 

Byrd, Margaret Mary, 1 104 Fifth Ave., Prichard 

Byrd, Martha Virginia, 1 104 Fifth Ave., Prichard 

Byrd, Shirley Mae, 4 625 Slack St., Gadsden 

Cain, Anne Cecile, 1 118 Crenshaw St., Mobile 

Caldwell, Betty Sue, 2 Route 3, Samson 

Caldwell, Shirley Burns, 2 505 Alabama Ave., Selma 

Campbell, Marion Lois, 2 Route 5, Andalusia 

Cannon, Jean, 2 Tallassee 

Cannon, Jeanine Estelle, 1 Dozier 

Canterbury, Mildred Mae, 2 Box 723, Huntsville 

Carpenter, Caroline Jane, 2 Winfield 

Carr, Mary Frances, 4 711 Central Ave., Talladega 

Carr, Mary Landal, 2 Cullman 

Carr, Sara Nell, 3 Route 1, Geneva 

Carter, Mary Nell, 3 Florala 

Cash, Marjorie Chrystine, 3 603 42nd Street, Fairfield 

Cash, Sara LeNelle, 2 603 42nd Street, Fairfield 

Cassels, Julius Vernon, 2 1122 N. 30th St., Birmingham 

Castro, Josef ina, 1 Calle 74 No. 14-14, Bogota, Colombia, S. A. 

Castro, Julia, 3 Calle 74 No. 14-14, Bogota, Colombia, S. A. 

Castro, Maria, 3 Calle 74 No. 14-14, Bogota, Colombia, S. A. 

Caton, Mary Louise, 4 417 E. Fifth St., Montgomery 

Causey, Jeanell, 3 Route 5, Fayette 

Chandler, Thelma Jane, 2 Silverhill 

Chandler, Virginia Dare, 2 4749 Second Ave., N., Birmingham 

Chapman, Jo, 1 Grove Hill 

Cheape, Julia Tutwiler, 2 Greensboro 

Chesnut, Ann Elizabeth, 1 Route 1, Silas 

Chevalier, Francine, 4 5 Rue Gay Lussac, Paris, France 

Childers, Judie Newton, S Route 2, Skipperville 

Childress, Vera Marie, 3 Calera 

Chism, Doris Jewel, 3 Montevallo 

Christiansen, Christina, 3 Route 4, Clanton 

Christopher, Edward Acton, 2 1236 S. 10th St., Gadsden 

Clark, Dorothy Beatrice, 1 Route 1, Maylene 

Clark, Mary Joan, 1 613 S. Three Notch, Andalusia 

Claughton, Hugh Dawson, 2 Verbena 



180 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Clayton, Edith Margaret, 1 CoUinsville 

Clements, Mary Joyce, 2. 1615 Woodland Ave., Birmingham 

Clements, Ruth Elizabeth, 3 Talladega 

Clemons, Doris Anne, 2 102 N. Second Ave., E., Cullman 

Clenney, Robbie Katherine, 2 Route 2, Abbeville 

Cleveland, Dorothy Elizabeth, 2 1716 Franklin St., Selma 

Cleveland, Edna Carol, 2 Lawley 

Cline, Mary Lee, 3 Route 1, Helena 

Cobb, Joan, 1 Grove Hill 

Cochran, Anita Persons, 3 Hurtsboro 

Cochran, Betty Jo, 1 CoUinsville 

Cochrane, Elenore Geraldine, 4 5301 Fifth Ave., S., Birmingham 

Cohron, Marilyn Joyce, 2 368 Cohron St., Crichton Sta., Mobile 

Collins, Elizabeth Gene, 2 Thorsby 

Collum, Daisy Clarice, 4 629 Euclid Ave., Mobile 

Connally, Ann Davidson, 4 238 S. 9th St., Gadsden 

Cooley, Annie Montez, 3 410 S. Gates St., Dothan 

Cooley, Dana Vaughn, 2 1628 Holbrook Ave., Bessemer 

Cooley, Jackie, 1 410 S. Gates St., Dothan 

Cooley, Mary Jean, 1 Route 1, Empire 

Cooper, Shelah Bane, 1 Route 1, Thomaston 

Cope, Juliette Elizabeth, 2 Inverness 

Coplin, Doris Elaine, 3 4 Jackson St., Lanett 

Cotton, Barbara, 3 Chatoni 

Cowart, Stephen Daniel, 2 Calera 

Cox, Mamie Sue, 1 Deatsville 

Craft, Martha Rena, 4 Lineville 

Craig, Ola Geraldine, 1 442 Grant St., Decatur 

Crawford, Rebecca Jean, 1 Minter 

Crawford, Sue Ellen, 2 Marion 

Creel, Alice, 2 Box 300, Sylacauga 

Cronin, Evelyn Harriet, 1 114^2 Whitaker St., Savannah, Ga. 

Crow, Martha Elizabeth, 1 1511 Leighton Ave., Anniston 

Crow, Sarah Margaret, 1 859 Fifth Street, W., Birmingham 

Crutcher, Margaret Anne, 4 514 N. Jefferson St., Athens 

Cum, Lura Alma, 2 Ill S. 10th St.. Gadsden 

Curtis, Evelyn Elizabeth, 4 2420 N. 39th Ave., Birmingham 

Curtis, Susan, 3 2420 N. 39th Ave., Birmingham 

Dale, Mary Alice, 3 Oak Hill 

Daniel, Jamie Sue, 3 Centre 

Daniel, Sara Emma, 4 Round Mountain 

Daniels, Sara Alice, 2 2 Capitol Ave., Montgomery 

Daughtry , Mary Lou, 3 Hartford 

Davis, Doris Ann, 1 1328 2nd Court, W., Birmingham 

Davis, Frances Janet, 2 914 E. 4th St., Panama City, Fla. 

Davis, Mary Cathryn, 1 Gorgas 

Dawson, Gloria Anne, 2 14 Dartmouth Circle, Montgomery 

Dean, Dorothy Dianne, 2 25 Groves Ave., Alexandria, Va. 

Deason, Edith Estella, 4 America 

Deason, Mable Esther, 2 321 Moncrief St., Prattville 

Dees, Maesie Carolyn, 1 Route 1, Grand Bay 

Dees, Mary Alice, 2 Repton 

Deliso, Mary Jane, 2 90-47 Pitkin Ave., Long Island, N, Y. 

Denney, Mildred, 2 Route 1, Hanceville 

DeVaughn, Eloise, 3 Route 1, Lineville 

Dickson, Mary Louise, 2 216 W. Holmes St., Huntsville 

Dillard, Laura, 1 50 Owen St., Ozark 

Dinkins, Anne Eulalia, 3 25 Courtland Dr., Montgomery 

Dismukes, Ann Elizabeth, 1 5 N. Ellis St., Prichard 

Dismukes, Gwendolyn Vail, 2 5 N. Ellis St., Prichard 

DiVecchia, Bobbie Irene, 2 9408 Georgia Ave., Silver Springs, Md. 

Dixon, Annie Rebecca, 3 Hatchechubbee 

Dixon, Edith Annette, 3 Dixon's Mills- 
Dixon, Marjorie, 4 Thomaston 

Donald, Lyda Gay, 1 213 Lamar Court, Selma 

Dorroh, Jane Eloise, 1 703 Dusy, Dothart 

Dougherty, Joyce Dolores, 2 Route 7, Box 77, Athens 

Doyle, Sara Jeanne, 1 Thomasville 

Dunn, Delia Elizabeth, 2 Pine Hill 

Dunn, Rina Lou, 3 Haleyville 

Durand, Hilda Mercedes, 1 652 Comercio St., Miramar, Puerto Rico 

Easter, Daren Harrison, 2 906 N. 42nd St., Birmingham 

Easter, Frances Milton, 4 502 W. Gordon Dr., Decatur 

Easter, Jean Mary, 3 906 42nd Street, N., Birmingham 

Echols, True Edith, 2 169 Winston Ave., Mobile 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 181 

Eddins, Betty Joyce, 3 1244 15th St., S. W., Birmingham 

Edgar, Martha Jo, 4 Deatsville 

Edwards, Robert Adam, 1 Calera 

Edwards, Violet Marie, 1 Route 1, Burlington, Ky. 

Elkins, Betty Anne, 1 Route 1, Moulton 

Ellard, Judith Irene, 4 1400 W. North, Dothan 

Ellenburg, Mary Sue, 2 Gantt 

Ellis, Alice, 1 Castleberry 

Ellis, Susie Eugenia, 3 Belleville 

Elmore, Annie Sue, 2 Route 1, Elba 

Embry, Jean, 1 826 4th Street, W., Birmingham 

England, Elizabeth Earline, 3 Marion 

Enghsh, Nina Belle, 3 Elba 

Esslinger, Carolyn Jeanette, 4 Gurley 

Estes, Mary Louise, 1 Route 4, Jasper 

Eurick, Mary Katherine, 1 Route 1, Box 83, Greensboro 

Evans, Betty Sue, 4 907 N. 6th, Florala 

Evans, Doris Rae, 3 608 Olimpo, Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Evans, Margaret Muriel, 1 613 Fifth Street, S. W., Birmingham 

Evans, Mary Anderson, Ir., Montevallo 

Falls, Annie Laura, 1 Gainesville 

Farlow, Kathleen Joyce, 1 Montevallo 

Faucett, Lou Ellen, 4 630 Turrentine Ave., Gadsden 

Fillingim, Winifred, 1 Tuskegee 

Fincher, Laura Meredith, 2. 15 Grant St., Lanett 

Findlay, Margaret Brown, 3 310 Avenue W, Bii-mingham 

Findlay, Mary Janet, 1 310 Avenue W, Birmingham 

Fitch, Dorothy Elizabeth, 1 Grand Bay 

Floyd, Leah Joyce, 2 512 Montgomery St., Andalusia 

Fomby, Helen Margaret, 1 Goodwater 

Force, Beryl Clarice, 2 775 Stuyvesant Ave., Irvington, N. J. 

Ford, Frances, 1 Butler 

Ford, Helen Elizabeth, 3 2902 Avenue N, Birmingham 

Ford, Joanna, 2 206 W. Walnut, Sylacauga 

Forsythe, Amelia Joyce, Ir Montevallo 

Foshee, James King, 2 Clanton 

Foster, Anita Eloise, 1 1860 Brownlee St., Mobile 

Foster, Irene, 4 Route 4, Box 524-A, Huntsville 

Foster, Josephine Fuller, 1 161 W. State Street, Windsor, Vt. 

Franklin, Madge Juanita, 2 Box 176, Troy 

Freeland, Janice Marie, 4 Grand Bay 

Frego, Rena Louise, 1 Fairhope 

French, Dorothy Elizabeth, 2 121 E. 22nd St., Anniston 

Frost, Dora Grace, 2 Route 1, Calera 

Furr, Billie Joyce, 2 32 Allenby Ave., Prichard 

Gaines, Eleanor Ann, 3 515 - 25th St., Birmingham 

Gamble, Clara L., 2 Route 3, Box 626-C, Bessemer 

Gardien, Barbara Lois, 2 1013 Greenwood Ter., Birmingham 

Garner, Ann Blair, 2 113 Pleasant Rd., Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Gaston, Bettye Jo, 2 1950 Clinton Ave., Mobile 

Gates, Martha Byrd, 2 .415 Locust St., Huntsville 

Gawronski, Annette Agnes, 1 36 Kiefer, Buffalo, N. Y, 

Gibson, Enith Grace, 4 Gilbertown 

Gibson, Rebecca E., 1 Jacksboro, Tenn. 

Gibson, Tommie Lou, 3 4617 10th Ave., N., Birmingham 

Giddens, Dorothy Lee, 2 Route 4, Andalusia 

Gilbert, Ivadine, 3 Route 1, Portersville 

Gillespie, Mable Pauline, 4 1624 Graymont Ave., Birmingham 

Gilmer, Yvonne Dahlia, 1 Red Bay 

Girshon, Phyllis Diana, 3 377 Morris Ave., Newark, N, J, 

Gissendanner, Sarah Virginia, 2 Pinckard 

Glass, Jeannine Ann, 1 Alexander City 

Goldstein, Yetta Bart, 3 Lincoln 

Golightly, Audrey Ann, 3 1809 Quintard Ave., Anniston 

Golson, Mary Frances, 3 Prattville 

Goode, Gloria, 3 430 S. 10th St., Gadsden 

Gore, Betty Jean, 2 Route 1, Clanton 

Graham, Nellie Marie, 3 Coden 

Gramling, Anne Marie, 1 709 Randall St., Gadsden 

Grant, Dorothea Louise, 3 Route 2, Verbena 

Grant, Grace Marie, 4 Route 2, Verbena 

Grantham, Mary Elizabeth, 4 Uniontown 

Green, Margaret Alice, 3 4642 Avenue R, Birmingham 

Green, Sylvia Carlisle, 2 409 Sherman St., Decatur 

Greene, Flossie Elizabeth, 2 200 Morgan St., Dothan 



182 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Greer, Bettye Joyce, 2 810 Montgomery Ave., Sheffield 

Gregory, Josephine Glenmoore, 1 630 Brown Marx Bldg., Birmingham 

Griffin, Bettye Lane, 1 Newville 

Griffin, Mildred Aniece, 2 Marion 

Griffin, Sybil, 2 218 3rd St., Gadsden 

Griffith, Mary Valentine, 4 922 E. Cervantes, Pensacola, Fla. 

Grindle, Ruth Evelyn, 2 Route 1, Sardis 

Guilford, Martha Chapman, 4 918 Forrest Ave., Gadsden 

Hale, Betty Burson, 1 Pine Apple 

Hale, Katharine Ann, 3 Pine Apple 

Haley, Betty, 1 Haleyville 

Haley, Betty Jean, 1 1033 N. 52nd PI., Birmingham 

Hamer, Grace Jeanette, 2 Demopolis 

Hamilton, Beulah Jo, 4 515 E. Walnut, Decatur 

Hamilton, Helen Marion, 2 Route 4, Hamilton 

Hamilton, Marietta, 2 Route 4, Clanton 

Hamner, Vera Nell, 4 Arley 

Hancock, June, 2 Grady 

Harbison, Roy S., 2 Route 1, Box 164, Fairhope 

Hardee, Era Earleen, 3 107 Barton St., Andalusia 

Hardwick, Ruth, 3 Route 1, Hartselle 

Hardy, Rosemary, 2 221 N. 51st St., Birmingham 

Hare, Theressa Ann, 1 Box 723, Sylacauga 

Harless, Mary Jane, 3 405 Newman Ave., Huntsville 

Harper, Doris Jean, 2 620 S. 49th St., Birmingham 

Harrell, Margaret Edith, 4 1616 29th Avenue, N, Birmingham 

Harris, Leona Lizette, 1 Marbury 

Harris, Mary Chiles, 2 Elmore 

Harris, Mary Jo, 2 16 S. 32nd Street, Birmingham 

Hassler, Nina Carolyn, 1 2501 Avenue Q, Birmingham 

Hasson, Miriam, 1 Camden 

Hasty, Betty Jo, 1 Linden 

Hatfield, Joyce Otero, 4 Euf aula 

Hathaway, Phyllis Evelyn, 2 102 N. Hopper St., Montgomery 

Havens, Virginia, 4 Alexander City 

Hawkins, Dixie Ruth. 3 1701 W. Third Ave., Gastonia, N. C. 

Hawkins, Eva Lucille, 4 Collinsville 

Hawkins, Harriette Beatrice, 1 Sulligent 

Hayes, Margaret Esther, 2 4728 Terrace S, Birmingham 

Haynes, Lenda Ann, 3 Woodland 

Hearon, Agnes Maria, 3 Thomasville 

Hef lin, Mary Elizabeth, 4 Danville 

Henderson, Virginia, 4 Carthage, Miss. 

Heptinstall, Betty Ann, 1 1624 Gurnee Ave., Anniston 

Hicks, Mary Dane, 1 Marvel 

Hilbun, Ethel Marie, 3 874 6th St., W., Birmingham 

Hill, Frances Blackwood, 4 Cleveland 

Hines, Ann Carter, 1 719 E. Holmes St., Huntsville 

Hixson, Helen Darwin, P. G 700 Alabama Avenue, Selma 

Hodges, Elizabeth Jeannette, 1 Ashville 

Hodges, Margaret, 4 Ashville 

Holcomb, Edith Marion, 2 1572 Kellogg St., Mobile 

Holcombe, Zemma Pitts, 2 Calera 

Holesapple, Martha Elizabeth, 4 312 5th Avenue, W., Decatur 

Holliday, Anita Jo, 3 Childersburg 

Hollomon, Martha Jean, 1 209 7th Avenue, W, Decatur 

Holmquist, Mary Louise, 2 1809 Oxmoor Rd., Birmingham 

Holsombeck, Murray Franklin, 1 Johns 

Hooper, Doris Anne, 2 201 Alabama Ave., Selma 

Horn, Elizabeth Anne, 1 , 1207 Elmira St., Mobile 

Home, Mary Lou, 1 866 W. Holmes St., Huntsville 

Horsley, Faye Annette, 4 416 Bay St., Gadsden 

Housen, Bebe Zainab, 2 Star Route, Hatchechubbee 

Houston, Betty Marie, 1 Fayette 

Howell, Doris Nell, 4 309 W. Jefferson, Aberdeen, Miss. 

Huger, Eliza Alwera, 2 1901 Wilmer Ave., Anniston 

Hulme, Edna George, 1 Box 32, Alexander City 

Hunter, Sarah Elizabeth, 1 Danville Rd., Decatur 

Hurst, Mozelle Maude, 2 612 Belle Ave., East Gadsden 

Hurston, Martha Louise, 2 115 S. Norton, Sylacauga 

Hutson, Verna May, 1 Route 1, McCalla 

Hyatt, Alice Aldora, 3 Grady 

Hyde, Jack Winlam, 1 Maylene 

Hyde, Delia Willene, 4 Fayette 

Ikerman, Dorothy Celeste, 1 516 Pettus St., Selma 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 183 

Ingram, Barbara Jeanne, 3 Box 98, Tarrant 

Ingram, Howard David, 2 Route 6, Box 570, Birmingham 

Ingram, Jane, 1 Route 1, Box 11, Castleberry 

Ingram, Margaret Ethel, 4 1705 Pinson St., Tarrant 

Israel, Ella Wayne, 1 Haleyville 

Ivey, Opal Pauline, 2 Range 

Jacks, Catherine Annette, 1 804 E. Clinton St., Huntsville 

Jackson, Miriam Jean, 1 1415 46th Street, B. H., Birmingham 

Jackson, Peggy Jean, 4 56 Curry Court. Talladega 

James. Edith Ann, 2 1021 Chestnut St., Gadsden 

Jemison, Mary Lea, 1 Route 2. Talladega 

Jenkins. Betty Lynn. 3 719 Lookout St., Gadsden 

Jerkins, Peggy Lois, 1 Geneva 

Jernegan, Lenora Annette, 3 Ozark 

Jetton, Mildred Obera, 2 Cullman 

Johnson, Alene. 2 730 Second Avenue, N., Clanton 

Johnson, Berniece Christine, 2 337 39th Street. Fairfield 

Johnson, Betty Nell, 2 Red Bay 

Johnson, Connie Ruth, 1 602 S. Norton, Sylacauga 

Johnson, Eila Mae, 2 Route 5, Clanton 

Johnson, Jean Cathrine, 3 Montevallo 

Johnson, Margaret Jeane, 1 Route 1, Box 38, Florala 

Johnson, Mary Cecil, 2 Hartselle 

Johnson, Mary Helen, 2 Calera 

Johnson, Peggy Jean, 1 3835 43rd Avenue, N., Birmingham 

Jones, Dorothy Frances, 2 Route 4, Clanton 

Jones, Edna Ruth, 3 Route 2, Georgiana 

Jones, Hannah Ruth, 1 1806 Carter Hill Rd., Montgomery 

Jones, Harriet Elizabeth, 3 6 Felder Ave., Montgomery 

Jones, Matred, 4 701 Dillingham St., Phenix City 

Jones, Nina Frances, 4 Route 2. Verbena 

Jones, Peggy Elizabeth, 4 Aliceville 

Jones, Sara Loyd, 1 336 8th St., Gadsden 

Jones, Willie Lou. 4 Route 1, East Tallassee 

Jordan, Daisy Mae, 2 Millry 

Jordan. Jean Claire, 3 Thomasville 

Josey, Martha Elizabeth, 2 Route 1, Castleberry 

Joyal, Roland Joseph, 2 Barre, Vt. 

Kaegi, Elisabeth Odeli, 3 600 Quintard Ave., Anniston 

Kelley, Doris Evelyn, 2 Montevallo 

Kelley, Eleanor Ann. 1 4170 51st Avenue, N, Birmingham 

Kelley, Mildred Anne, 4 Box 215, Tallassee 

Kellum, Marian, 1 Box 533, Jasper 

Kelly, Frances Blake, 3 230 Franklin St., Selma 

Kelso, Lois V., 1 201 41st Street, Fairfield 

Kendrick, Edith Mae, 1 Maylene 

Keneipp, Mary Joanne, 2 _ Route 2, Mt. Carmel, 111. 

Kennedy, Irving Palmer, jr., 2 Clanton 

Kennedy, Martha Helen, 1 Lower Peach Tree 

Kennedy, Mildred Marie. 3 Oak Hill 

Kennerly, Margaret Dwight, 2 Montevallo 

Killingsworth, Hazel Virginia, 3 Fiomaton 

Kimbrough, Susie Smith, 1 Chatom 

King, Alice Johnston, 4 Route 7, Box 937, Bessemer 

King, Dorothy Mae, 3 Dahlonega, Ga. 

King, Sarah Delilah, 2 Route 2, Box 6, Columbiana 

Kirk, Hazel, 2 Greensboro 

Kirkley, Bernice Cliff ortine, 3 Underwood 

Knight, Margaret Bernice, 3 223 Village Court, Birmingham 

Knotts, Lucille, 3 Route 2, Box 11, Georgiana 

Knotts, Vermey Lee, 4 Route 2, Box 11, Georgiana 

Knowles, Elwyn Joy, 1 Newville 

Knowles, Inez, 4 Route 1, Headland 

Knox, Betty Jean, 2 Luverne 

Kohen, Ann Evelyn, 3 223 Lambert Ave., Mobile 

Kohen, Barbara Lula, 1 223 Lambert Ave., Mobile 

Kornegay, Henriella, 3 Route 2, Box 306, Birmingham 

Kynerd, Bettie Ruth, 2 228 Water Ave., Selma 

Kynerd, Virginia Pauline, 4 228 Water Ave., Selma 

Lacey, Agnes, 2 Maylene 

Lakeman, Grace Hinton, 2 Haleyville 

Landers, Grady Hilton. 1 Route 1, Fayetteville 

Lane, Betty Jean. 3 Box 105, Decatur 

Lane. Frances Lurlene. 1 Deatsville 

Lanier, Gwendolyn Joyce, 1 Wetumpka 



184 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Lanier, Helen, 2 2030 Ninth Ave., S., Birmingham 

Larson, Florence Birgitta, 1 Route 2, Box 247, Shelton, Conn. 

Lawrence, Peggy Ruth, 1 Vance 

Lay, Laurie Virginia, 1 307 Woodland Ave., Birmingham 

LeCroy, Nell Elizabeth, 4 Castleberry 

Lee, Georgie Ruth, 1 213 N. Barcelona St., Pensacola, Fla. 

Lee, Sara Catherine, 1 Headland 

Lemmon, Marie Carolyn, 2 2413 Glendale, Tuscaloosa 

Lewis, Alpha Young, 1 Linden 

Lightsey, Laura Frances, 1 2101 Agate Ave., Mobile 

Lightsey, Margaret Vance, 1 Centreville 

Lightsey, Sara Nell, 2 Route 2, Centreville 

Lindley , Floy Marie, 2 905-D Bullock, Chickasaw 

Littlejohn, Tommie Sue, 1 Route 4, Clanton 

Loiry, Ruth Eleanor, 1 207 E. Ft. Williams, Sylacauga 

Long, Janet Marie, 1 711 W. Lakeview, Pensacola, Fla. 

Lovelady, Edith Grady, 4 Montevallo 

Lucas, Edith Merle, 1 Route 1, Montevallo 

Lucas, James Howard, 2 Montevallo 

Lucas, Zenoba McCuUey, 3 Montevallo 

Lukes, Anna George, 1 1003 S. Cedar St., Mobile 

Lyda, Mary Lula, 3 Frisco City 

Lynch, Bertha Eileen, 2 58 Undercliff Rd., Millburn, N. J- 

Lynch, Betty Mae, 2 1911 Madison Ave., Montgomery 

McAbee, Frances Margaret, 4 Piedmont 

McCall, Alice Carolyn, 3 608 N. 8th Street, Opelika 

McCartha, Irma Joyce, 1 Bay Minette 

McCary, Beth Ann, 2 1400 Fourth Avenue, W., Birmingham 

McClain, Helen Grant, 1 Acmar 

McCollough, Jacquelyn Susy, 2 35 Oak St., Alexander City 

McConnell, Anne Marie, 3 Traf f ord 

McDaniel, Roland, 1 Route 1, Box 112, Montevallo 

McDonald, Bettie, 1 85 Village 1, Sheffield 

McKibben, Jessie Agnes, 2 Ragland 

McLain, William Glenn, 2 Calera 

McLean, Carrie Will, 1 Box 746, Huntsville 

McLeod, Vivian Louise, 1 .- 512 West St., Montgomery 

McNeil, Dorothy Elizabeth, 1 St. Stephens 

McPherson, Margaret Evelyn, 2 Whistler 

McRae, Jo. Anne, 1 104 Edgemont Ave., Montgomery 

McSween, Maxine, 2 702 Cherokee St., Mobile 

McWhorter, Martha Mae, 2 Fort Payne 

Mabry, Joyce Baker, 4 Montevallo 

Mackie, Cecelia Jean, 4 319 - 38th Street, Fairfield 

Mackie, Helen Marie, 2 319 - 38th Street, Fairfield 

Maddox, Sue Ann, 1 Route 2, Hartselle 

Maddux, Betty Dee, 2 1038 Jupiter St., Gadsden 

Magazu, Frances Willard, 1 19 Pearl St., South Braintree, Mass. 

Magus, Harriet Dalphine, 2 .90-34 Pitkin Ave., Ozone Park, N. Y. 

Majors, Alma Jean, 4 1423 Alabama Ave., Gadsden 

Majors, Nelda Joyce, 2 McKenzie 

Manasco, Lorene, 4 Brookside 

Manning, Catherine Elizabeth, 3 Route 4, Box 1010, Huntsville 

Martin, Martha Ann, 4 212 S. 67th St., Birmingham 

Mathison, Annie Belle, 4 Red Level 

Matson, Kathryn Voncile, 1 Childersburg 

May, Annie Merle, 4 Salitpa 

May, Macie Elizabeth, 3 508 S. Westland, Tampa, Fla. 

Mayes, Mary Elizabeth, 1 1524 Quintard Ave., Anniston 

Mayton, Mary Nell, 1 Orrville 

Mendenhall, Dorothy, 3 Magnolia 

Merriken, Betty Jane, 2 Pikesville Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

Merrill, Claire Jeanette, 4 Dozier 

Metcalf, Willie Dell, 2 Slocomb 

Middlebrook, Ola Mae, 1 .Route 1, Marion 

Miller, Charlotte Louise, 2 1315 E. Broad St., Gadsden 

Miller, Farley. 4 1315 E. Broad St., Gadsden 

Mills, Grace Alice, 1 R. F. D., Salem 

Milton, Elizabeth, 2 1515 S. 13th Place, Birmingham 

Mims, Annie Ruth, 2 Headland 

Mims, Dorothy Delphine, 4 Vida 

Mims, Mary Clyde, 1 724 7th Street, S., Clanton 

Mims, Melba, 2 Route 1, Clanton 

Mims, Sara Nell, 2 Route 4, Clanton 

Minor, Lois Elaine, 1 2714 Alabama Ave, Selma 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 185 

Minshew, Ruenette, 4 Box 287, Gadsden 

Mitchell. Dorothy Mae, 1 Talladega Springs 

Mitchell, Mary Ruth, 3 Cullman 

Mitchell, William Henry, 1 Montevallo 

Moncrief , Joyce Lamar, 1 Letohatchie 

Montz, Eloise, 2 Akron 

Moody, Tommie Linda, 2 308 S. Broadway, Sylacauga 

Moore, Margaret Jane, 1 4636 Terrace S., Birmingham 

Moore, Ruby deJernett, 3 Route 1, Centre 

Morgan, Erline Mabel, 1 Georgiana 

Morgan, Evelyn Ausula, 1 Route 1, Maplesville 

Morgan, Marilla Anne, 3 5032 8th Court, S., Birmingham 

Morris, Carvel Lee, 1 67 Minor Terrace, Childersburg 

Morrison, Elizabeth Bruce, 1 41 W. North Mall, Trussville 

Moseley, Robbie Lee, 1 Ill E. First St., Sylacauga 

Motes, Floy Wren, 1 210 E. Fourth St., Sylacauga 

Murphy, Jean Carolyn, 2 Thomaston 

Murphy, Lenora Ruth, 3 Route 1, Centreville 

Nail, Emmie Alice, 1 304 Dusy St., Dothan 

Nazaretian, Angeline, 2 510 39th Street, Fairfield 

Nelson, Anna Gayle, 4 Box 535, Athens 

Nelson, Doris Nell, 2 917 Overton Ave., Tarrant 

Nettles, Elizabeth Snow, 1 Tunnel Springs 

Newton, Eileen Pittman, 3 2121 14th Avenue, S., Birmingham 

Newton, Jimmilyn, 4 Route 5, Dothan 

Nicholas, Betty Jean, 2 Route 10, Box 817-A, Birmingham 

Nicholas, Charlotte Bernice, 4 Route 10, Box 817-A, Birmingham 

Noel, Micheline, 4 1 Villa St. Georges, Antony, Seine, France 

Nolen, Ann Catherine, 3 1712 Quintard Ave., Anniston 

Norred, Juliet, 2 Pine Apple 

Norton, Jacquelyn Arrena, 3 Silas 

Ogletree, Effie Doris, 1 9 S. Norton Ave., Sylacauga 

O'Gwin, Lucy Ellen, 2 Nauvoo 

O'Gwynn, Margaret McNiel, 3 Route 2, Evergreen 

Old, Mary Todd, 1 210 Lawrence St., Lawrenceburg, Tenn. 

Oliver, Lois Geneva, 1 1929 Highland Ave., Montgomery 

Owen, Bessie Laurel, 4 Route 1, Toxey 

Owen, Mary Anna, 1 Route 3, Clanton 

Paduano, Anita Dolores, 2 619 Fenn St,, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Page, Corrie Margaret, 1 12 Plum' St., Montgomery 

Palmer, Mary Alice, 3 1118 Government St., Mobile 

Palmer, Sara Ellen, 4 1118 Government St., Mobile 

Parker, Betty Lee, 1 1010 E. Lloyd St., Pensacola, Fla. 

Parker, Roy V., 2 Calera 

Parnell, Gloria Ann, 1 1314 Avenue I, Bessemer 

Parris, Ruby Nell, 1 Route 2, Box 4-C, Oxford 

Parsons, Elizabeth Lorene, 3 Box 1206, Talladega 

Parsons, Marianna, 4 Box 1206, Talladega 

Parsons, Marie Vivian, 4 Box 278, Selma 

Parsons, Sarah Mirian, 4 Box 278, Selma 

Pasche, Betty Jean, 4 707 Teetshorn, Houston, Texas 

Pate, Louise, 4 Castleberry 

Patterson, Charles Harold, 3 Route 2, Clanton 

Patterson, Margaret, 3 Pinson 

Patton, Avaline, 3 Route 5, Box 275, Bessemer 

Patton, Clara Janis, 3 Tutwiler Hotel, Birmingham 

Patton, Mary Evelyn, 1 5023 18th Avenue, N., Birmingham 

Paulk, Jane Pitts, 4 Route 2, Union Springs 

Pauly, Herbert Eugene, 2 Route 1, Montevallo 

Peacock, Dorothy Mae, 2 110 Edgeview Ave., Birmingham 

Pearson, Doris Mildred, 1 Route 1, Mountain Creek 

Pendergrass, Ida Price, 4 Fort Payne 

Pendleton, Betty Jean, 2 Montevallo 

Phelps, Martha, 3 406 Church Street, Selma 

Phillips, Betty Lou, 3 McKenzie 

Phillips, Joanne, 3 Elm St., Troy 

Phillips, Margaret Louise, 2 Esom Hill, Ga. 

Pickett, Jacqueline Jean, 2 Monroeville 

Pierson, Peggy Anne, 2 Hayesboro, Nashville, Tenn. 

Pinnell, Marion, 2 Camp Hill 

Pitts, Dora Ellen, 2 1427 33rd Avenue N, Birmingham 

Plaster, James Jordan, 2 Autaugaville 

Plott, Deanne Kilgore, 4 Cordova 

Plott, Lela Mae. 2 Verbena 

Poole, Mary Grace, 4. 3100 First Avenue, S., Leeds 



186 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Poole, Robert Eugene, 1 Route 1, Randolph 

Popwell, Audrey, 1 , Clanton 

Post, JoAnn, 2 309 N. Second St., Hamilton, Ohio 

Potts, Lucy Elizabeth, 1 Route 1, Box 78, Brierfield 

Powell, Alma Virginia, 4 Prattville 

Powell, Kathryn Heard, 3 617 Denson St., Fairfax 

Powell, Marileta, 1 , Snow Hill 

Powell, Mavis Loraine, 4 Route 5, Clanton 

Powell, Peggy Joyce, 1 Carson 

Prentice, Julia Deane, 4 418 Brookfield, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Presley, Opal, 1 McKenzie 

Price, Annie Dilla, 2 Route 1, Esom Hill, Ga. 

Price, Jane Irene, 1 Route 1, Esom Hill, Ga. 

Priester, Martha Mae, 4 Opelika 

Propst, Lenora Sue, 1 Fayette 

Quarles, Nell Elaine, 4 Box 503, Mobile 

Rainer, Martha, 2 Kiba 

Rains, Barbara Lou, 2 Fort Payne 

Rankin, Gladys Ivor, 2 1702 Rocky Hollow, Anniston 

Rasberry, Alice, 4 Clanton 

Rattray, Dora Gene, 3 1203 S. 10th St., Gadsden 

Rawls, Fann Lynelle, 1 Route 6, Andalusia 

Reach, Carol Bazemore, 1 Montevallo 

Reeder, Mary Elizabeth, 1 Sayre 

Reeve, Joy Eugenia, 2 6012 Wooten Dr., Falls Church, Va. 

Register, Virginia, 3 910 N. 41st St., Birmingham 

Reid, Drexel Elizabeth, 4 810 N. 83rd St., Birmingham 

Rentz, Mary, 3 Gilbertown 

Rhodes, Barbara Frances, 2 461 Wisconsin Ave., Mobile 

Rhodes, Mary Helen, 4 Rutledge 

Rhodes, William Wilton, 1 Clanton 

Richardson, Jessie Helen, 1 Cortelyou 

Richardson, Nina Frances, 3 Notasulga 

Richburg, Gloria Jewel, 4 Route 2, Luverne 

Riethmaier, Alice Eloise, 2 813 W. Vine St., Decatur 

Roberts, Dorothy Sue, 4 Route 1, Winfield 

Robertson, Frances Joy, 2 Comer 

Robertson, Phyllis Mae, 1 Bayou La Batre 

Robinson, Chestine, 3 Range 

Robinson, Kathryn Gillespie, 1 Boothton 

Robinson, Mary Louise, 2 Route 5, Clanton 

Rodgers, Betty Jean, 1 206 42nd Street, Fairfield 

Rodgers, Mary Bernice, 2 223 Water Ave., Selma 

Rodgers, Rebecca Ann, 2 Foley 

Rogan, Julia, P. G Montevallo 

Rogers, Frances, 4 504 Church St., Mobile 

Rogers, Martha Eloise, 2 Winfield 

Rowe, Bobby Louise, 3 505 Federal Dr., Montgomery 

Rowell, Gloria, 1 25 Satterfield St., Selma 

Royston, Mary Evelyn, 1 Route 1, Five Points 

Ruiz, Mabel, 3 Box 1571, Aquadilla, Puerto Rico 

Russell, Lillian Nan, 3 Happy Valley Farms, Rossville, Ga. 

Sanford, Lois Virginia, 4 3905 N. 39th Ave., Birmingham 

Savage, Joyce Minnette, 3 4627 Terrace S, Birmingham 

Saxon, Bettye George, 1 4932 7th Avenue, S., Birmingham 

Schmidt, Evelyn Marie, 2 1761 Steiner Ave., Birmingham 

Schreiner, Charlene Lula, 1 1108 Gimon Circle, Mobile 

Schuessler, Frances, 1 LaFayette 

Scott, Carolyn, 1 Butler 

Screws, Betty Louise, 2 Box 426, Opelika 

Scribner, Wilda Mae, 1 206 Second St., Chickasaw 

Seabury, Betty Virginia, 2 115»^ Florence PL, Mobile 

Seibert, Frances Holman, 4 Wewahitchka, Fla. 

Seibert, Lillian Claudine, 2 751 Wilson Ave., Prichard 

Self, Gloria Ellen, 1 Altoona 

Sellers, Tommye Jean, 2 Route 1, Letohatchie 

Sessoms, Margaret Hannah, 4 221 Church St., Andalusia 

Shackleford, Georgia Aileen, 3 Hogansville, Ga. 

Shamblin, Betty Ann, 1 1108 8th Avenue, Tuscaloosa 

Sharp, Jean, 2 1457 18th Avenue, S., Birmingham 

Sheffield, Elsie, 3 Coy 

Shelbrack, Joyce Barbara, 2 504 W. Phillio St., Rhinelander, Wis 

Shelbrack, Mary Anne, 1 504 W. Phillip St., Rhinelander, Wis! 

Shelley, Allyson, 3 Headland 

Shelton, Sheila June, 2 Route 12, Box 890, Birmingham 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 187 

Shofner, Vivian Elizabeth, 1 Route 1, Grand Bay 

Shotts, Edral Jean, 2 Route 1, Bexar 

Simmons, Foye, S Route 2, Clayton 

Simms, Myra Helen, 1 1010 Ward Ave., Huntsville 

Simpson, Joseph Woodly, Jr., S Route 1, Box 179, Calera 

Sims, Allie Ruth, 2 Excel 

Sims, Martha Ingram, 4 Ashland 

Sims, Rachel, 1 Renfroe 

Singley , Mary Elizabeth, 1 Jackson 

Slack, Jaclyn. 1 655 Chin St., Prichard 

Slade, Ernestine Bonner, 1 Camden 

Slate. Dixie Lee, 1 915 S. 16th St., Birmingham 

Smith, Anna Bee, 1 Route 1, Box 145, Aliceville 

Smith, Etta Marie, 1 814 Mt. Meigs Rd., Montgomery 

Smith, Frances Carolyn. 2 Box 168, Alexander City 

Smith, Hilda Jeanette, 1 Box 493. Sylacauga 

Smith, Howard Nell, 3 Maplesville 

Smith, Ida Catherine, 2 Route 1, Box 145, Aliceville 

Smith, Margaret Hamilton, 4 Prattville 

Smith, Margaret Louise, 1 Owens Cross Roads 

Smith, Martha Griggs. 1 Stroud 

Smith, Mazie Jean. 2 407 S. Main St., Atmore 

Smith, Milton Cuyler, Jr., 3 Montevallo 

Smith, Odis Rudolph, 2 Route 2, Clanton 

Smith. Sara McQueen, 4 Montevallo 

Smith, Virginia Louise, 1 Black Diamond 

Smitherman, Dorothy Janice, 1 Plantersville 

Snowden, Frances Louise, 1 Monroeville 

Snuggs. Mary Nell, 1 Haley ville 

Somerall, Mary Sue, 1 Route 2, Box 330, Evergreen 

Speer, Charles Edward, 2 Clanton 

Speller, Sara Jane, 2 114 Perry St., Andalusia 

Spence. Charlotte. 4 Box 142, Athens 

Spindler, Lillian Wilma, 3 31 Landvale Rd., Spotswood, N. J. 

Spinks, Madge, 3 Thomasville 

Stabler, Grace Cornelia, 1 Fairhope 

Stallworth. Helen Burke, 1 Thomaston 

Stallworth, Lee, 2 Evergreen 

Standifer, Ann, 1 312 Sanford St., Eufaula 

Stanf ield, Peggy Sue, 4 Walnut Grove 

Stanford. Irene Lillian. 2 Pine Apple 

Steiner. Jane Crawford. 1 1007 S. 28th St., Birmingham 

Stephens, Betsy Bain, 3 315 N. 15th St., Bessemer 

Stephens, Kathleen, 4 1125 Seventh Ave., Gadsden 

Stephens. Sally. 3 Prattville 

Stewart. Carolyn Isabel. 2 Wilsonville 

Stewart. Frances Louise, 1 Berry 

Stewart, Laura Mae, 2 Tanner 

Stillman, Elizabeth Jane. 1 Route 2, Box 94. Homestead, Fla. 

Stilwell. Helen Malloy. 1 2721 20th Place, W.. Birmingham 

Stinson, Nelle Orene, 2 Route 1, Pine Apple 

Stone. Ruby Roberts. 2 Route 1, Lexington 

Stovall. Bettie Florence, 4 1017 Lockwood Court, Anniston 

Strock, Mary Evelyn. 2 708 N. 4th St., Attalla 

Strong, Lois Carol. 1 Cary. 111. 

Strozier. Jerry. 2 Route 2, Box 303. Birmingham 

Sugg. Nell Lenora, 1 Goodwater 

Sumrall. Mary Louise, 2 364 Tuttle Ave.. Mobile 

Tabolin. Anna, 2 437 Barbey St.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Taylor. Betty Wright. 2 1814 Toulmin Ave.. Mobile 

Taylor. Carolyn Marie, 4 894 W. Holmes, Huntsville 

Templeton, Elsie Ruth, 1 231 Fifth Way, Alexander City 

Terry, Beauford, 3 130 Minor Terrace, Childersburg 

Tew, Cornelia Ann, 1 Wallace 

Thomas, Betty Ellen. 2 Route 2. Section 

Thomas, Marguerite Zoe. 1 409 Pine Hill Dr., Mobile 

Thomas, Mary Alma, 3 Pope 

Thomason, Nancy Anne, 1 610 Oak St., Decatur 

Thompson. Clare. 3 2019 Stevens St.. S. Jacksonville, Fla. 

Thompson. Emogene, 4 Route 4. Opelika 

Thompson. Martha Lu. 1 1826 Slade Drive. Columbus, Ga. 

ThomDSon, Mary Elizabeth, 1 Route 3, Huntsville 

Thompson, Sally. 1 500 E. Madison St.. Troy 

Thompson. Willabeth, 1 418 Haralson Ave., Gadsden 

Todd, Louise Jane, 3 Courtland 



188 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Trione, Rachel Julia, 2 Daphne 

Trotter, Frances Merle, 3 321 Foster St., Opp 

Trotter, Mary Pearl, 1 321 Foster St., Opp 

True, Lida Louise, 3 504 Marlborough, Detroit, Mich. 

True, Sarah Margaret, 1 504 Marlborough, Detroit, Mich. 

Tucker, Barbara Helen, 1 1540 52nd Street, W. Birmingham 

Tunstall, Ursula Ina, 1 70 Crenshaw St., Mobile 

Turner, Katherine Jean, 2 903 N. Broad, Rome, Ga. 

Turner, Sara Jean, 3 221 Baisden St., Andalusia 

Tyson, Joyce Owen, 4 Toxey 

Vann, Kate Helen, 1 Headland 

Vines, Doris Fay, 2 1613 33rd Avenue N, Birmingham 

Vineyard, Grace M., 1 2900 W. Jackson, Pensacola, Fla. 

Virciglio, Peggy Jo, 1 1332 41st Street, B. H., Birmingham 

Wadeson, Anne Huntington, 1 205 Princeton Ave., Birmingham 

Waldheim, Martha Ruth, 3 Zacapa, Guatemala 

Waldrop, U. V., 1 Route 1, Randolph 

Wallace, Dorothy Ray, 1 501 Henry St., Bemiston, Talladega 

Wallace, Elizabeth Nell, 4 Trinity Rd., Decatur 

Ward, Emerie Jean, 2 Uriah 

Ward, Martha Leneta, 1 1410 45th St., Birmingham 

Ware, Mary Ann, 2 Roanoke 

Warren, Eloise, 1 Route 2, Castleberry 

Warren, Juanita, 2 Castleberry 

Waters, Lucy Lee, 2 Atmore 

Watson, Martha Evelyn, 1 Luverne 

Watson, Shirley Ann, 1 Box 463, Sylacauga 

Weitzner, Doris Rose, 2 3317 Wilson Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Welch, Eunice Carolyn, 1 164 Second Way, Alexander City 

Wells, Dorothy Virginia, 1 201 E, 28th St., Anniston 

Wentworth, Helen, 4 Route 3, Shelby ville, Ky. 

Wesley, Dorothy Deane, 2 1924 Rocky Hollow Rd., Anniston 

Wesson, Mary Ruth, 4 303 S. Franklin St., Alexander City 

Whaley, Sarah Ann, 2 715 N. 3 Notch St., Troy 

White, Harry Clayton, 1 Siluria 

Whitehead, Cecil Collier, Jr.. 2 431 S. 5th St., Gadsden 

Whitworth, Rayceil, 4 229 8th Avenue W, Decatur 

Wiant, Doris Marie, 1 Route 1, Marion 

Wigington, Jean Antoinette, 1 2422 10th Avenue S, Birmingham 

Wiginton, Betty Jane, 2 Gordo 

Wilder, Sara Elizabeth, 3 300 Sixth Ave., Andalusia 

Wilder, Willie Mae, 4 1101 4th Avenue N, Clanton 

Wilhelm, Marie Beatrice, 3 Box 499, Chickasaw 

Williams, Robert Edwin, 3 Calera 

Williams, Shirley Ellen, 3 11 Franklin St., Oneonta, N, Y. 

Williamson, Doris Anne, 2 Route 1, Sterrett 

Williford, Marjory Ernestine, 2 719 Clayton St., Montgomery 

Wilson, Ann Keith, 2 329 39th Street, Fairfield 

Wilson, Betty Lou, 3 Camden 

Wilson, Elizabeth Ann, 1 701 E. 7th St., Anniston 

Wilson, Sarah Frances, 1 Route 1, Box 374, Birmingham 

Windle, Ella Jane, 1 Route 2, Aliceville 

Winslett, Catherine Jones, 4 1806 Carter Hill Rd., Montgomery 

Wood, Arrie Mae, 1 Route 2, Wilsonville 

Wood, Helen Home, 3 Box 766, Andalusia 

Wood, Jimmie, 2 Route 1, Columbia 

Woodham, Margaret Lenora, 1 Route 2, Hartford 

Woods, Frances Marion, 4 Montevallo 

Wooten, Mildred, 2 Montevallo 

Worrell, Martha Jo, 2 Route 2, Selma 

Worthington, Laura Jean, 1 1616 Granville Ave., Bessemer 

Wright, Betty Lee, 2 202 W. Oak St., Weatherford, Texas 

Wright, Edna Ray, 1 Leeds 

Wynn, Katharine Elizabeth, 2 Box 304, Gadsden 

Wynn, Mary Frances, 3 1010 E. Savannah St., Dothan 

Yackee, Burt H., Jr., 1 621 Slack St., Gadsden 

Yackee, Marjorie Ann, 4 621 Slack St., Gadsden 

Yancey, Rebecca Joe, 3 Red Bay 

Yates, Polly Frances, 3 Route 2, Woodland 

Yates, Willene, 2 4428 Montevallo Rd„ Birmingham 

Yeates, Louise Musgrove, 2 Route 6, Box 491-C, Bessemer 

Young, Betty Jane, 2 Route 1, Box 35, Morris 

Young, Margaret Lee, 3 Moulton 

Youngblood, Doris Mae, 1 Route 1, Montevallo 

Zeigler, Donald Edwin, 2 Fayetteville 

Zelvelder, Eve Aafje, 4 17 Avenue de Clichy, Paris, France 



189 
SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 

1947-1948 ... ^u:: 

Bachelor of Arts 

Fourth Year Students 71 

Third Year Students 74 

Second Year Students 102 

First Year Students ;..,. 121 

Total 368 

Bachelor of Science 

Fourth Year Students 58 

Third Year Students.. 69 

Second Year Students 131 

First Year Students 133 

Total 391 

Bachelor of Music 

Fourth Year Students. 3 

Third Year Students 12 

Second Year Students 11 

First Year Students 26 

Total 52 

Post-Graduate Students 2 

Irregular Students 3 

Special Students 3 

Total in Regular Session 819 

Enrollment by Classes 

Fourth Year Class 132 

Third Year Class 155 

Second Year Class 244 

First Year Class 280 

Post-Graduate Students 2 

Irregular Students 3 

Special Students 3 

Total 819 

Summer School (1947) 490 

Total in Regular Session and Summer School 1309 

Extension Groups 278 

Correspondence Study 115 

Laboratory Schools 741 

GRAND TOTAL 2443 



190 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



SUMMARY BY COUNTIES OF STUDENTS IN 
REGULAR SESSION 



Autauga 9 

Baldwin 9 

Barbour 6 

Bibb 8 

Blount 1 

Bullock 2 

Butler 8 

Calhoun 21 

Chambers 6 

Cherokee 7 

Chilton 33 

Choctaw 9 

Clarke 10 

Clay 3 

Cleburne 1 

Coffee 4 

Colbert 2 

Conecuh 18 

Coosa 2 

Covington 21 

Crenshaw 5 

Cullman 6 

Dale 4 

Dallas 24 

DeKalb 7 

Elmore 8 

Escambia 7 

Etowah 30 

Fayette 7 

Franklin 3 

Geneva .: 6 

Hale :: 4 

Henry 9 

Houston 9 

Jackson 1 



Jefferson 115 

Lamar 3 

Lauderdale 1 

Lawrence 3 

Lee 6 

Limestone 5 

Lowndes 2 

Macon 2 

Madison 19 

Marengo 11 

Marion 3 

Mobile 48 

Monroe 8 

Montgomery 21 

Morgan 20 

Perry 7 

Pickens 6 

Pike 4 

Randolph 3 

Russell 4 

Shelby 56 

St. Clair 4 

Sumter 1 

Talladega 32 

Tallapoosa 10 

Tuscaloosa 4 

Walker 7 

Washington 8 

Wilcox 13 

Winston 6 

Out-of-State 65 

Foreign Countries 12 



Total. 



.819 



191 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1947 
January 24, 1947 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 



Zelna Scott 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Martha Daniel McCracken Margaret Elizabeth Yarbrough 

June 2, 1947 



Alice Anderson 

Anna Caroline Barfield 
** Virginia Wildman Barnes 

Daun Colette Benson 

Evelyn Evangeline Blue 
**Anne Maxwell Cain 

Kathleen Hambrough Cheape 

Helen Louise Clayton 

Jane Carole Cogle 

Sara Elizabeth Crane 

Evie Heaton Crook 

Betty Jo Davis 

Muriel Swanson Dees 

Marion Crawford Dillon 
**Edith Runelle Dixon 
**Chantal H. Dumont 

Ella Ruth Gauntt 
*Franklee Gilbert 
**Lennie Sue Goree 
** Virginia Harris 
**Mary Catherine Hatley 
*Mary Erin Hubbert 

Hylda Sue Jones 



* Grace Louise Korth 
Glenna Faye LeCompte 
Elizabeth deYampert LeVert 
Augusta Sims Lovelady 
*Mary Frances Martin 
Jeanette Mason 

** Betty Lowery Mitchell 
Emilia Morales Afanador 

**Addie Lou Parris 
Sara Elizabeth Reid 
Loris Layne Reynolds 

** Virginia Lynn Rice 

**Marjorie Elizabeth Richmond 
Sara Nell Robison 
Nancy Adele Simmons 
Winifred Smith 
Ethel Southard 
Martha Aloise Sowell 
Hannah Holiday Stewart 
Merle Lunsford Taylor 

**Nell Rose Thompson 
Evelyn Walker 
Charlotte Ann Wilder 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE 



Mayo Ernestyne Baker 

*Stacie Virginia Beavers 

** Hilda Nell Gibson 

Mildred Claire Howe 

Virginia Inez Kershaw 



**Rosalie Pickens Marshall 
*June Ellen Middleton 
Sadie Margaret Thompson 
Marie Price Tipper 
Henry Evelyn Wilson 



*Graduated with highest honors. 
**Graduated with honors. 



192 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 



Martha Jeanette Andrews 

** Julia Anne Ballard 

** Sarah Barr 
Nell Elizabeth Blackburn 
Marion Louise Brantley 
Elizabeth Gorman Brotherton 
Mary Elizabeth Collins 
Charlotte Kathryn Cook 
Elvalyn Fahan Crawford 
Mildred Jeane Davis 
Dolores Earnest 
Mary Elizabeth Ellis 
Anita Parish 
Denise Virginia Faucett 
Bettye Margaret Franke 
Nanqr Lee Gordon 
Willie Faye Grider 
Mary Lou Hardee 
Helen Virginia Hassler 

**Mary Elizabeth Havens 
Doris Lee Herrod 
Marion Virginia Hodges 
Lillie Louise Holcombe 
Lucy Jean Hutchison 
Elizabeth Leon Jeffrey 
Zadie Frances Jernigan 



** Bonnie Lou Jones 

Phoebe Jones 

Sarah Elizabeth Leeman 
**Winna Faye Maxwell 
** Annie Katherine May 

Margaret Murphy 

Jane Augusta Neff 
** Martha Estelle Nettles 

Virginia Louise Paulk 

Helen Peterson 

Eunice Adeline Prater ' 

Jeanne Priester 

Mary Frances Radney 

Hazelee Ruth Reid 

Billie Roberts 

L. Faye Robinson 

Wanda Roy 

Wilma Nell Sanford 

Sharon Shelley 

Margaret Elizabeth Sims 

Margaret Ann Stokes 

Mary Griffin Waltz 

Lady Ruth Weed 

Peggy Williams 

Mary Margaret Wimberly 



July 26, 1947 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Bernice Clegg **Elsa Alma Ignacio 

Peggy Mahan Davis Sarah Martha Morris 

Hildreth Hembree Ferem **Mae Young Summerlin 

, BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE 

Mary Brown Earnhardt 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Alice Ray demons Ellen Louise McLain 

Bettye Joyce Crowell Alice Mary Marik 

Mabel Davis Kathryn Elizabeth Sims 
Imaell Causey Kornegay 



♦Graduated with highest honors. 
♦♦Graduated with honors. 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1947 193 

August 29, 1947 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
Edith Elaine Devaughan Martha Jean Plant 

** Maude Stall ings Gross 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

Miriam Strock Gaines ** Betty Eastwood Robertson 

Joyce Glasscock Fay Shamburger 

Mary Evelyn Pate * Sarah Thompson 
Margaret Cottingham Raley 



*Graduated with highest honors. 
♦♦Graduated with honors. 



INDEX 



Absences, 61 

Academic Regulations, 58 
Acceleration, 64 
Accounting, 166 
Accreditation of College, 19 
Administration, 7 
Admission, 55 

Advanced Standing, 55 

Blanks, 57 

Prescribed subjects, 55-56 

Special students, 55 

Subjects accepted, 56 
Alumnae Association, 32-35 
Anatomy, 91 
Announcements, Departmental, 

87-176 
Applications for Admission, 57 

For aid, 44 

For degrees, 62 
Art, Announcements, 87-90 

Curriculum. 67 
Astronomy, 160 
Bachelor of Arts Degree, 63, 66- 

72, 97-99 
Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree, 79-80 
Bachelor of Science Degree, 63-64, 

73-78, 132-134 
Bacteriology, 92 
Biology, Announcements, 91-94 

Curriculum, 73-74 
Board of Trustees, 6 
Board. Cost of, 52 
Botany, 91 

Buildings and Grounds, 19-26 
Calendar, 4-5 

Certificates, Teachers', 107, 130, 149 
Changes in Charges, 54 
Changes in Courses, 61 
Chemistry, 159-160 

Curriculum, 75 
Classification, 61 
Club Service, 30 
Clubs. 38-43 
College Night, 28 
Commencement, 5 
Concert and Lecture Course, 29 
Condition Examinations, 58 
Condition, Grade of, 58-59 
Conduct, 27 

Correspondence Courses, 30, 158 
Cost of Attendance, 52-54 
Course numbers, 59 
Curricula, 65-78, 97-99. 132-134, 

151-153 
Dancy Lectures, 29 
Degrees, 63-64 

Conferred in 1947, 191-193 

Requirements for, 63-64 
Directed Teaching, 95, 103, 105, 140, 

157 
Directory, Student-Faculty, 43 



Drama Service. 31 

Dramatics, Course in, 172-176 

Economics, 170-171 

Education, Announcements, 95-108 

Early Childhood Curriculum, 98 

Elementary Curriculum, 97 

Secondary Curriculum, 99 
Eligibility to represent College, 60 
Employment of Students, 44 
English, Announcements, 109-112 
Enrollment, 178-190 
Entrance, Requirements for, 55-56 
Examination, Admission by, 55 

Condition, 5, 58 

Music, 143 
Executive Committee, Board of 

Trustees, 6 
Expenses, 52-54 
Extension Service, 30 
Faculty and Officers, 7-16 

Committees, 17 
Fees, General, 52 

Local students, 52 

Music, 53 

Out-of-state students, 52 

Refund of, 54 

Speech, 53 
Fire Protection, 24 
Foreign Language, announcements, 

113-116 
French, 113-114 
Geography, 129 
German, 114 

Government, Student, 27 
Grades, 58, 60 
Graduates, 191-193 
Graduation, Requirements for, 62- 

64, 143 
Greek, 114 

Health of students, 27 
Health and Physical Education, an- 
nouncements, 117-125 

Curriculum, 11 
Historical statement, 18 
History, announcements, 126-129 
Home Economics, School of, 

130-140 

Courses, announcements, 135-140 

Curricula, 70, 132-134 
Home Study Service, 30, 58 
Honorary Fraternities, 35-38 
Honors, 60 
Hour, Unit of Credit, 58 

Basis of classification, 61 

Requirements for graduation, 62 
Laboratory School Faculty, 16 
Laboratory Schools, 106 
Late Registration, 5, 57 
Latin, 114-115 
Latin American Civilization, 85-86 



INDEX 



Liberal Arts Curriculum, 66 

Loan Funds, 47-51 

Local Students, 52 

Location of College, 19 

Major, Requirements for, 63-64 

Mathematics, announcements, 

141-H2 

Curriculum, 16 
Medical attention, 27 
Medical Stenographers, 83 
Medical technicians course, 74 
Minor, Requirements for, 85-86 
Music, School of, 143-158 

Admission, 143 

Bachelor of Arts Degree, 68 

Bachelor of Music Degree, 
151-153 

Certification, 149 

Curricula, 68, 151-153 

Examinations, 148 

Fees, 53 

Recitals, 149 

Requirements for degrees, 143 
Numbering System, 59 
Organ, 20, 151, 153 
Organizations, 32-43 
Orientation, Freshman, 57 
Out-of-state Students. 52, 190 
Payments, 52-54 
Philosophy, 163 
Physical Education, See Health 

and Physical Education, 117-125 
Physical Science, announcements, 

159-160 

Curriculum, 75 
Physics, 159, 160 
Physician, College, 27 
Physiology, 92 
Piano, 153 

Placement Bureau, 30 
Play Workshop, 176 
Political Science, 128 
Probation and Dismissal, 60 
Psychology and Philosophy, an- 
nouncements, 161-163 

Curriculum, 69 
Publications, 43 
Public Administration, 81-82 
Public Health, 74, 94 
Radio Station, WAPI, 23 
Records and Grades, 58 
Recreation Minor, 83-84 



Refund, 54 

Register of Students, 178-188 
Registration, 5, 57 
Religious Education, announce- 
ments. 164-165 
Religious Life, 28 
Reports, 58 
Room reservation, 57 
Schedule of work, 58 
Scholarships and Employment, 

44-51 
Scholarship requirements, 60 
School Music, 153 
Secretarial Science, announce- 
ments, 166-167 

Curricula, 78, 82 
Semester System, 58 
Shorthand, 166 
Social Work, 71, 169-170 
Sociology, announcements, 168-171 

Curriculum, 71 
Spanish, 116 
Special Services, 29-31 
Special Students, 55 
Speech, announcements, 172-176 

"Clinic, 176 

College Theatre, 25, 39 

Curriculum, 72 

Fees, 53 

Radio. 175-176 

Recitals, 176 _ 
Retail Economics, 70, 134 
Student Aid, 44 

Student Government Association, 42 
Student Handbook, 43 
Students, Government of, 27-28 

Local, 52 

Organizations, 32-43 

Out-of-state, 52, 190 

Register of, 178-188 

Special, 55, 189 

Summary of, by classes, 189 

Summary of, by counties, 190 
Summer School, 177 
Table of Contents, 3 
Transfer of credits, 62-63 
Transcripts of records, 59 
Trustees, Board of, 6 
Typewriting, 166 
Vocational Advisorv Service, 31 
Withdrawals, 54, 60 
Zoolog>% 92 



The Times Printing Co., Montevallo, Ala.